Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola



Download 112.13 Kb.
Date conversion04.05.2016
Size112.13 Kb.
Grade 2

Author Study: Tomie dePaola

Written collaboratively by Second Grade teachers, Chets Creek Elementary School

 

Books that you will need for these lessons:

Stega Nona

Big Anthony

Nana Upstairs & Nana Downstairs

Now One Foot, Now the Other

Oliver Button Is a Sissy

The Legend of the Bluebonnet

Tom

Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka



Stagestruck -part of collection but not used.

 

Books that are great read alouds during this unit of study:

 

 

Resources:



Official Website:  http://www.tomie.com/
Tomie's blog:  http://tomiesblog.blogspot.com

Wiki:  http://gdrsd.pbwiki.com/+Grade+2+Author+Study+Ideas  (Follow Big Anthony to Italy on Google Earth) (Tomie's Video Interview)

Tomie Powerpoint to Introduce Him to Students http://www.emints.org/ethemes/resources/S00001182.shtml

Meet the Author Interview (kid friendly) http://www.bookpage.com/0003bp/tomie_depaola.html

Comprehensive List of Books and Biography http://www.answers.com/topic/thomas-anthony-depaola

Literature Book Activities http://www.emints.org/ethemes/resources/S00000496.shtml

Lesson Ideas for Now One Foot, Now the Other: http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/score/now/nowtg.htm

Vocabulary Hangman Game: Legend of the Indian Paintbrush http://www.quia.com/hm/69404.html

Multicultral Literacy Activity for The Legend of the Bluebonnet: An Old Tale of Texas  http://www.school-library.org/multicultural/SNOEK-BROWN%20-%201.htm

Making Inferences http://eduscapes.com/sessions/pilot/pilotinference.htm

Character Trading Cards: http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/trading_cards/

Lessons ideas http://www.indiana.edu/~reading/ieo/bibs/depaola.html

Online book Nana Upstairs & Nana Downstairs

Cause and Effect-Jamie o Rourke http://primary-school-lesson-plans.suite101.com/article.cfm/use_an_irish_folk_tale_to_teach_cause_and_effect

Clarify ideas and words student bookmarks http://forpd.ucf.edu/strategies/Bookmarks.pdf

 

Online Book: http://books.google.com/books?id=SRTcYosXIHYC&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=tomie+depaola+readers+theatre&source=bl&ots=NcJNOVdZX1&sig=a7YKqMYrPh3G-pbjTB0luJ3BNt0&hl=en&ei=857DSfO4DuKrtgev3ojICg&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=5 &ct=result#PPP1,M1



 

 

Reader's Theatre Script:

The Art Lesson: http://www.u-46.org/roadmap/files/Primary%20Roadmap/ReadersTheatretArtGrd2.pdf

 

Blog Posts:

 

http://kidlitfromwendy.blogspot.com/2007/05/here-we-all-are-by-tomie-depaola.html 

 

Glogster:



http://morganl2.glogster.com/Tomie-dePaola/

 

 



Attribute Chart Suggestions (possible categories) * must haves --Attribute Chart at the End of this Google doc

*Title


Characters

Setting


*Theme

Noticings

Wonderings

*Movement Through Time

Vocabulary

Plot


Problem

Solution

*Genre

*Author's Craft



 

 

 



 

 

************************************************************************************************************* 



 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Readers' Workshop

 

Lesson 1:  Kick-off, Getting to Know Tomie dePaola

Materials: computer with internet access, copies of Tommie dePaola books

 


 

Connection:  We have read books by a variety of authors this year.  For the next few weeks, we will be reading several books by the same author.  We are beginning our author study of Tomie dePaola. 

 


 

Teach:  Tomie dePaola is the author of several popular books.  (show students copies of books) Let me introduce you to Tomie dePaola.  (show picture of Tomie)  Here is some footage of Tomie during an interview.  (show footage of Tomie)  (use PowerPoint to share more info about Tomie)

 

 



Active Involvement:  Turn and Talk to the person next to you about the things we have learned about Tomie dePaola so far. What are some things you would like to learn during the author study?

 


 

Link:  As we continue studying this author, use your independent reading time to notice similarities and differences to Tomie's style for writing. 

 

 



Share:  Have students share noticings from independent reading. 

 

 



 


*********************************************************************************************

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

Writers' Workshop 



Lesson 1:  Chart: What We Know About Tomie dePaola 

Materials: chart paper, markers, books on display

 


 

Connection:  In Readers' Workshop today, we learned about our exciting new author study of Tomie dePaola.  We looked at some footage of an interview by Tomie and viewed a PowerPoint presentation to learn more about him.

 


 

Teach: An important part of any author study is to learn about the life, inspirations, and techniques used by an author.  Today we are making a chart that we will be adding to throughout the author's study.  Our chart will be titled, What We Know About Tomie dePaola.   

 

 



Active Involvement: Let's think back to what we learned during Readers' Workshop earlier today.  What can we add to our chart at this point in the study?  (let students add to the chart)

 


 

Link:  As we continue to learn more about Tomie dePaola, we will be adding to this chart. Keep in mind that we will not only be learning about Tomie dePaola, we will be learning from him. We will be studying his crafts and implementing them in our own writing. Today your goal is to finish up whatever you have been working on because tomorrow we are starting our unit on Response to Literature.

 

 



 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Readers' Workshop

 

Lesson 2: Genre Review/Movement Through Time 

Materials: books from a variety of genres, Oliver Button is a Sissy

 

Connection: Yesterday we learned about a new author.  His name is Tomie dePaola.  One of the cool things that we learned yesterday is that Tomie writes in a variety of genres.  Today we are going to talk about the different genres.  This way we can review and make sure that we all understand what the differences between books.  I also want us to talk about Movement through time as part of all the genre features.

 

Teach: For this you can decide how to review with your class since we have probably all taught them differently.  I inserted a chart that looks close to the chart that I will use to remind us of the genres as we go through the Author Study.


Genre

Definition

Characteristics

Fantasy

A fiction story where there is a struggle between good and evil.  Often times, there is magic.  The characters or objects do things that couldn't happen in real life.  Creatures may be in the story that don't exist in life.

movement through time

Folk Tale

any belief or story passed on traditionally, esp. one considered to be false or based on superstition.

movement through time

Memoir

An account of the personal experiences of an author

movement through time

Realistic Fiction

The characters behave in realistic ways.  There is usually a problem or conflict to be solved.  The setting is in modern times.

movement through time

Legend

a nonhistorical or unverifiable story handed down by tradition from earlier times and popularly accepted as historical

movement through time

 

 As we read books during this author study we will find that even though the books are from different genres they all have one thing in common.  They are all moving through time.



Active Involvement: Read "Oliver Button is a Sissy."  Have the class identify which genre the book fits in best.  Then have them turn and talk about why they think it fits into that genre.  If any more characteristics are identified add them to the chart.   
Link:  So today while you are reading I want you to think about the books you have.  See if you can identify which genre they fit in and why.  Remember that good readers always explain why.  

 

 



Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 2: Intro to response to literature

Materials:  Chart on Tomie from lesson 1, Tomie books

 

Connection: Yesterday we looked at everything we learned about Tomie dePaola.  Today we are going to take that a step farther and start talking about how to respond to his books.

 

Teach:  We already know part of what it means to respond to a book.  We know that we can do a retelling or a summary of the book to respond to book.  But there is so much more that we can do that we haven't even begun to talk about.  There are so many cool ways that we can respond to books and I am so excited to tell you about them.  As we read more Tomie books we are going to talk really deeply about theme.  When we talk about theme we are going to write a claim.  A claim is when we state what we think about the book.  But as almost 3rd graders we don't just say "we think..."  we say "we think...because..." and we create a believable reason of why we think that.  We also will write letters to Tomie with questions about his books.  And last we will write variations of his books, which means that we will write the story and change something when we do.

Active Involvement: 

 


 

Link:   

 

 



 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 3: Attribute Chart  

Materials: Attribute Chart

 

Connection: We have talked about Tomie dePaola for a couple of days now and even read many of his books.  Today we are going to begin an attribute chart for his books.  This will be one way that we compare all the books that we read by Tomie.

 

Teach:  An attribute chart is a great way to learn about the books we are reading.  In an attribute chart we have many different columns to fill out for each book.  If you look up here at the chart you will see that I have already put in some of the books that we will be reading.  Now we need to learn about each column so we can fill in the information on the books we have already read.  The first column is for the genre.  What genre do you think "Oliver Button is a Sissy" would fit into? (Use this book to fill in the characters, setting, and movement through time columns.  save the theme, noticings, and wonderings for later.)  We also need to fill in the column titled author's craft.  Author's craft is something the author does that is unique to that author.  Here are some examples.  As we look at these examples see if you think this book has any of these.  Remember that good readers always give reasons for what they think.  (Use the Author's Craft website to give examples to the kids)

Active Involvement: Have the students turn and talk about what they think the author's craft is.  After a few minutes of talking add to the chart the craft that they have the best evidence for.

 

Link: When you are reading today think about each column.  See if you can fill in the chart in your head with the book that you are reading.  This will help you to have a better understanding of each column.

 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Writers' Workshop

 

Lesson 3: What is a Plausible Claim

Materials:  Chart paper, Oliver Button is a Sissy

 

Connection: Earlier today we talked about the attribute chart.  I told you that good readers always give reasons to why they think a certain way.  Well that is also true when we are writers and that is called  a plausible claim.

 

Teach: When we make a plausible claim we are stating what we think and supporting it with evidence either from the book or from what we can infer from the book.  (Give some non-examples that are silly and some examples for the kids to understand the difference.  Use "Oliver Button is a Sissy.")
examples: 


  • Oliver really liked to dance.  I know this because even though other people didn't believe in him at first he decided it was what he wanted to do anyway.

  • Oliver decided that it was ok to be different.  I know he was different because he didn't like sports like the other boys...he liked to dance.

non-examples:



  • Oliver really liked to dance.  I know because I like to dance and everyone is like me.

  • Oliver has mean friends.

Active Involvement: Now I want you to think about another Tomie book that we have read and write in your journal a plausible claim. (Let some students share if they are deep and well supported.)

 

Link: As you begin today I want you to think about the Tomie books we have read together and the ones you have read during independent reading.  See if you can make a plausible claim for each book you have read.  You can even try this with other books that you have read in your reading nook over the last couple of days.

 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 4: Theme with Evidence

Materials: attribute chart, Strega Nona

 

Connection: Yesterday we talked about making a plausible claim.  Today we are going to take that to the next step and talk about making a plausible claim about the theme, or message, of the Tomie books we have read.

 

Teach: The theme in a book is the main message the author wants us to understand.  It usually is a message that is not stated by the author.  The author wants us to figure it out by looking for the clues that they write in their book.  Read "Strega Nona."  

Active Involvement: Lets think about what the author might want us to understand from this book.  What message is he trying to tell us.  Talk through some of the responses the kids give you and be on the lookout for the quarter themes.  After the kids have shared tell them that the second step is using evidence from the book to confirm the theme.  Give them time to do this and chart it on the attribute chart.

 

Link:  Today you are going to find the theme of your independent books.  I will give you a sticky note and I want you to think about the theme of the book and use evidence from the book to support it.  

 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 4: Turning our Thoughts into Writing

Materials:  sticky notes from readers, attribute chart, Strega Nona

 

Connection: In readers we talked about theme and how to support it with evidence.  One way that we are going to respond to these books is by writing about the theme of the books we read and use evidence to support our thinking.

 

Teach: Model writing about the theme using evidence from Strega Nona.  Think aloud as you choose the evidence to use to support the theme.

Active Involvement: Turn and talk to your neighbor about the theme of the book you read during readers today.  Make sure that you include the evidence from the book when you tell it to your neighbor.

 

Link: When you go back to your seats you are going to put your thoughts, what you just explained to your neighbor, into writing.  You are going to write about the theme using your sticky note to remind you of the evidence that you chose to use.  Make sure that you give good evidence!

 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Readers' Workshop

 

Lesson 5:  Theme with Evidence

Materials: notecards or sticky notes, Big Anthony

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday we talked about the theme of books and learned how to support our interpretation with evidence.  During Independent Reading, you determined the theme of an idependent book and searched for evidence to support that theme.  Today we will do the same thing, but with the work of Tomie dePaola. 

 

 



Teach:  We know that the theme of the book is the underlying message the author is trying to share with the reader.  As second grade readers, we know that we must support our interpretation of the theme with evidence from the story.  We have already read the book, Big Anthony by Tomie dePaola and today we will be working to determine the theme and support our interpretation with evidence from the text. 

 

 



Active Involvement: Have students turn and talk with a partner about possible themes for Big Anthony and write them on sticky notes.  After students have had a chance to talk, call on students to share responses.  Chart student responses Theme/Evidence, to be used later in Writers' Workshop.

 

 



Link:  Today and everyday as you read, consider the theme, or message, the author is trying to share with the reader.  Make sure to consider the evidence that supports the theme.   

 

 



 

Share: 

 

**************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Writers' Workshop

 

Lesson 5: Turning Our Thoughts into Writing (Tomie book)  

Materials:  chart with notecards or sticky notes on theme, Big Anthony 

 

Connection: Yesterday in Writers' Workshop, we turned our thoughts about an independent book's theme into writing.  Today, we will be doing that with a Tomie dePaola book.  We will be using our charted interpretations on Big Anthony's theme to help us.    

 

 

Teach:  We know that the theme is the underlying message of a book, and that we must find evidence to support our interpretation of the theme. Thinking about the theme is the first step, now we are going to turn those thoughts into writing.  Model possible sentence starters for writing out interpretations (these might include:  In the book Big Anthony, the theme is ___________.  A common theme of Tommie dePaola's books is _____________.  This is seen in ____________, when___________) (Look at student notes on theme of Big Anthony.  Take one interpretation and begin to model transferring those thoughts into a more formal writing sample.) 



Active Involvement: Have the students volunteer other possible sentence starters for their writing of the theme.  Fill out a chart of sentence starters for the class to reference as they return to their seats for independent work.

 
Link:  When making a plausible claim about any book, it is important that we support our interpretation with evidence.  Keep that in mind today as we turn our thoughts about Tomie's books into writing.  

 

 

 



Share: 

 

**************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 6:  Accountable Talk 

Materials: Chart with Rules for Negotiating Text, variety of Tomie books the students have read

 


 

Connection:  We have been talking about Tomie dePaola and his books.  Today we are going to begin discussing his books in groups.

  


Teach: 

Tell students that good readers look at the characters of stories that are written by the same author and decide how they are different and how they are alike because this help them understand other characters that the author might write about. (Talking about characters is just a possibility.  You may discuss anything you choose with your class.)

Seat children in a circle and review rules for Negotiating Text.

Rules for Negotiating Text

 


  • Wait for silence to talk.

  • Look at the person who is talking.

  • Talk loud enough so people can hear.

  • Take a turn to talk. Only one person speaks at a time.

  • Use examples from the story. 

  • Always say "why" and explain yourself

  • If you disagree, do it politely and with a calm voice.

  • Ask the speaker to please use details and give reasons for their thoughts

  • Thank each other for sharing.

  • Ask questions.

 

  


     How are Tomie dePaola's characters, Strega Nona and Big Anthony the same and how are they different?  Start with something like: When I read the books I noticed that Strega Nona is far more reliable than Big Anthony. The people in the town rely on Strega Nona to find them love and cure their illnesses, they trust her to solve their problems.  Anothony, on the other hand, can't even take care of Strega Nona's house while she is away.  Strega Nona is there to fix Anthony's mistakes, she is more dependable and trusting than Anthony.
Active Involvement: Have the students follow the Rules for Negotiating Text and begin their own discussion about Tomie's characters (again, characters is just a suggestion).   Facilitate the discussion in the direction of talking about other ways these two characters are alike and how they are different.

 

How are these two characters alike? 



What in particular is the same? 

How are they different? 

How do you think the characters felt at the beginning of the story?   Did they change?  How? 

Would you rather be a friend of Strega Nona or Anthony?  Why?   What makes you think  that? 

Who do you know that acts like Strenga Nona? Anthony? How?

Who are you more like, Big Anthony or Strenga Nona?

Would you make the same choices as the characters?

What will the characters do next?

Who do you want to be more like?  Big Anthony or Strenga Nona?

 

 -Possibly have the groups add what they share how they are similar/different on a chart and present to class.



 

Nudge the students to use events in the story to defend their claim and provide details from the story to prove what they think.

  

 
Link:   As students are dismissed to individual reading, remind them that good readers often think about the characters and how they are the same and different from other characters that they might know.



As they are reading today, ask students to find a character in one of their independent reading books that reminds them of a Tomie dePaola character. 

 

Share: 

 

*******************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

  Writers' Workshop

 

Lesson 6: Using Questions for Evidence of Plausible Claim  

Materials:  variety of Tomie books, seed journal or sticky notes for student writing

 


 

Connection: We have been practicing making plausible claims and identifying the theme of Tomie dePaola's books for the past few days.  Today we are going to be continuing our study of plausible claims, and we will be asking ourselves questions to be sure we have supported our claims with evidence.

 


 

Teach:   A plausible claim is any reasonable statement we make about a book.  Plausible claims can be made throughout the book, as well as at the end.  Watch as I read portions of this Tomie book we've already read and make plausible claims.  (Read through a portion of a  book of your choosing, stopping on every page or so to make a claim.)  Making the claim is the first step, supporting that claim is the second step.  Here's how we are going to make sure we have thoroughly supported our claim.  --> Show the students the following t-chart:
              

Plausible Claim

Evidence

Big Anthony's family has had enough of his shenanigans.

  • In the illustration, Anthony's papa looks very angry with his furrowed brow and scowl.

  • Anthony's papa and nonna send him away from their home.

 

Model how for each plausible claim, they will need to pieces of evidence to support it.  They should ask themselves, "How do I know my claim is true?"  "Do I have enough evidence to support my claim?"  



Active Involvement:  Have the students help find evidence to support a second claim, asking themselves the questions mentioned earlier.  

 


 

Link:   Today as you head to your desks for independent work time, stop and think about your plausible claims...do you have two pieces of evidence to support your claim?

 

 



 

Share: 

 

********************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

Readers' Workshop 



Lesson 7:  Accountable Talk

Materials: Chart with Rules for Negotiating Text from yesterday, variety of Tomie books the students have read

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday we talked about the Rulels for Negotiating Text. We talked about Strega Nona and Anthony and how they are alike and different. We also started to discuss who we liked more and why. Today, we are going to be doing more of the same, but thinking deeper.

 


 

Teach: Dicuss one of the dePaola books with your students that you think they will have a lot of questions about (Nana Upstairs or Now One Foot).  Explain to students the difference between "thin" questions and "thick" questions.  (Thin Questions are ones that I call "Right There" questions. They can be easily answered in the text and often begin with Who, Where, When, How many, etc.  Thick Questions are ones that I call "Think and Search" questions. They are questions that lead to discussion and often begin with Why do you think...?,  What if?,   How would you feel if..?,   What might....?) Model some thin and thick questions for one of the dePaola books.

Active Involvement:  Have the students sit and think about some thick questions they may have.  Now have the students turn and talk, asking eachother thick questions about a specific Tomie book. Tell them that asking these questions is the way to start off a good discussion about a book.  Remind them of the Rules for Negotiating Text.

 


 

Link:    Before the students go off for independent reading. Have them sit and discuss the dePaola book with their reading partner; asking each other thick questions first which lead into the discussion. After about 15 minutes, have the students read independently for the remainder of the work period. Remind the students to be thinking of thick questions for their individual books as well.

 

 



 

Share:  Have students share their thick questions that they have for their independent book. If another student has read that book, have them answer the question.

 

**********************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 7:  Variations....What is it?

Materials: books by Tomie dePaola

   


Connection:  We have just finished writing our responses to some of Tomie dePaola's books. Now what I want to introduce to you is writing your own variation to a dePaola book. This is so much fun because it is taking some character(s) from his books and putting them on your own adventure! You could change the ending to a book or change some part of the story through out the book.

   


Teach: Model for students brainstorming ideas about a variation you could use. (ie. Strega Nona and Anthony on a new adventure.)

  


Active Involvement:  After you have brainstormed the variation out loud, have the students turn and talk about how they could change the story into something different and something all their own!

   


Link:    So just like response to literature, this is a new way to respond to the book. As you walk back to your seats I want you to be thinking about a dePaola book that you could write a variation of. Remember not to use the book that we just used as our model! Brainstorm; change an ending to a book, or a part in the story. You could even put some of the characters in a story all your own!

  


 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 8:  Cause/Effect (Inferring)

Materials: variety of Tomie books the students have read

 


 

Connection:  In many of the books that we are reading by Tomie dePaola (and in many books that you read everyday) the character is going through a journey in life. The character goes through the book and changes as different things happen to him/her. Today we are going to be talking about the characters and how they change and why they change.

 


 

Teach:  Discuss the book Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka with the children. Show them how the Pooka went through changes from being lazy to hard working. Talk to them about what made him go through thoes changes and why. Tell them that this is kind of like cause and effect. (Because the servant was lazy, he was turned into a Pooka. Once he was a Pooka he realized that he could not be lazy anymore.)

 

 



Active Involvement:  Have the students turn and talk about the book Tom and the characters in it. How did they change throughout the story and why?

 


 

Link:    During independent reading time have the students read their books and think about the characters in their own book. Did they change throughout the story? How? What caused them to change?

 

 



 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 8:  Model beginnging writing with variations

Materials: paper & pen (or computer using word), elmo

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday we learned about what a variation of a book was. We talked to eachother about different variations that we could use with a book by Tomie dePaola. Well, today we are going to take those stories that we were thinking of, pick the one that we want to use and start writing it!

 


 

Teach: Remember, a variation is taking a story and changing something in it, like the ending or another part of the story. You could also take any character from the story and put him/her in a new story that is all your own! (Here is where you would talk to them about the difference between a fractured fairy tale and a variation if they were having trouble with that yesterday:

 


  • A fractured fairy tale is taking the fairy tale and fracturing elements of the story but not the story line (most of the time)  

  • A variation could be a new adventure for Strega Nona, a new ending to a story, a major change in the storyline.  I would model brainstorming and writing one of my own from one of the stories and then have them pick from one of the others to write theirs.)

 

Begin writing your variation in front of the class.

 

Active Involvement:  As you are writing your variation, have the students turn and talk about something that you could add in the variation. Add in any suggestions that they may have.

 


 

Link:    Now today during independent writing, you are going to be writing your own variation on another book by Tomie dePaola. Yesterday you got to talk about and brainstorm many different variations about many of his books. Today I want you to pick one of those variations that you like the most and start writing it!

 

 



 

Share: 
************************************************************************************************************** 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 9:  Penny/Quarter Questions and Thoughts

Materials: Rules of Negotiating Text chart, variety of Tomie books the students have read

 


 

Connection:  We have talked a lot about discussing books and being accoutable for our talk about books. We have also talked about thick and thin questions. Well, today we are not only talking about thick questions, but also thick thoughts. I like to call them "Penny and Quarter Questions and Thoughts".

 


 

Teach: Which coin would you rather have? Which is worth more? Well, it is the same when it comes to questions and thoughts about books. No one wants a penny thought like "I think Anthony make lots of mistakes." We want quarter thoughts like, "I think Anthony just wants to do well so that Strega and the rest of the town is proud of him." See the difference between the two? A penny thought is something that you know because the text told you so. A quater thought is something that you think of beacuse of what you have read, but it does not say so in the story. (Putting yourself in the situation will help you to think about how you think the character is feeling at any given time.)

 

 



Active Involvement:  Have each student stop and think about the dePaola books that have been read so far. Have them think of a penny thought or question and a quarter thought or question. Have them turn and talk about their penny and quarter thoughts and the difference between the two.

 


 

Link:    We are almost in the third grade, so we don't want any more penny thoughts! Today as you read independently, as you have thoughts and questions about the book you are reading, make sure that you are thinking deeply and it is a quarter thought!

 

 



 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 9:  Variations, fix-up strategy

Materials: your first draft variation, red pen

 

 



Connection:  Now that we have written a first draft (or at least the beginning of it). Now it is time to look over it to see if there is anyway to fix it up!

 


 

Teach: What would be the best way to do that? Should I just skim over it? NO! I need to read this to a friend so that I know what I am missing. Let me read my first draft variation out loud to you so we can see if there is anything that I need to fix up.

 

 



Active Involvement:  (Read your variation; make sure it has mistakes in it!) Notice that I had it up on the elmo so that you all could look on with me? Make sure that your partner is able to look on and read over it as you are reading it out loud. This way they can help you with punctuation and spelling. 

 


 

Link:    Today in writing as you finish up your first draft of your variation, find a friend that you work well with to help you fix up your variation.

 

 



 

Share: 

************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 10:  Penny and Quarter Themes

Materials: Tom by Tomie DePaola  the Penny Quarter Chart from the day before.  Attribute Chart

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday  we discussed penny and quarter  questions.  Today we are going to discuss penny and 25 quarter themes and big ideas. 

 


 

Teach:   In the book Tom,  an example of a penny theme would be The two Tom's have things in common because they have the same name.  An example of a quarter  theme would be you could have something in common with someone that does not seem to be much like you.  For example Tom and his grandfather are very different in age and yet they found a great deal of common ground. 

 

 



Active Involvement:  Fill in the attribute chart for the book Tom about theme.  Refer to a previously read Tomie book and have the students name an example of a 1 cent and a 25 cent theme. 

 


 

Link:    Today and everyday when you read independently  try to think of 25 cent themes for the books you are reading.

 

 



 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 10:  Fix it Up,  Finish Variation

Materials:   Need the piece of writing that you have been modeling.

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday we were working on writing our ...  Today we are going to talk about how to fix up what we have already written and finish it up.

 


Teach:   Take out the model piece of writing that you have been using throughout,  use that piece of writing to model as a think aloud how to fix up their writing based on the needs of your own class.  

*  Be sure to look at your students writing prior to this to ensure that the corrections you make are the ones your class needs to see most. 

 

 

Active Involvement:  Have students make suggestions about parts  of your writing that need fixing up,  and how they suggest you make changes.



 

 

Link:    Today as you continue to work on the pieces that you have been trying to complete,  take the time to read over your work, and make the corrections that will take your work to

  the next level.  You may also have a partner read your writing to offer suggestions for improvement.  Pl ease make the appropriate changes to your writing and finish up this piece.

 

Share: 


*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 11:  Compare and Contrast Books from the same genre

Materials: Large  premade Venn Diagram to be filled out as a class.  Two Tomie books that have been read previosly to the class that are from the same genre.

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday the focus was on 25 cent themes.  Today we are going to use that deeper thinking as we compare two Tomie books from the same genre. 

                      *  use the attribute chart to choose two texts from the same genre. 


 

 

Teach: Using a large class Venn diagram,  model a few details comparing the similarities and differences between the two texts that you have chosen. 

 

 

Active Involvement:  Invite the students to help you fill in the rest of the Venn Diagram. 



                                *  This may turn into an opportunity to fill in some of the noticings on your attribute chart.  Be sure to fill them in as you go along. 

 


 

Link:    Today and everyday  pay attention to the fact that books from the same genre will have many things in common, which is why they are from the same genre,  however there are many things that will make each book unique. 

 

 



 

 

Share: 

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 11:  How to write Compare/Contrast

Materials: Venn Diagram from Readers' Workshop, 

 


 

Connection:    Today in Readers' Workshop we used a Venn Diagram to compare two Tomie De Paola books that were from the same genre.  Today in Writers' Workshop we are going to use that new knowledge to help us make comparisons and contrasts in our writing.

 

Teach:  Model, writing a compare/contrast piece using the Venn Diagram as a reference for your writing.             


Active Involvement:    The students make suggestions as the teacher models which information to include and which to exclude. 

 

Link:      Today as you write, please write a comparison/contrast  using the Venn Diagram as a guide.  Be sure to engage your reader with an interesting beginning, as well as keep your reader satisfied with a quality ending.

     

Share:  Students share what they have completed that day

***************************************************************************************************************

 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 12:  Compare and Contrast books from a different genre

Materials: Variety of Tomie Books placed at the tables.  A class set of Venn Diagrams at the tables.

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday we used a Venn Diagram to compare two books from the same author that were from the same genre.  We discovered that there were many similarities due to the similar genre and author,  but we also discovered many differences.  Today we are going to focus on making comparisons between two books from different genres. 

    * as you did yesterday take a look at the Attributes chart to choose two books from two different genres.

 

 

Teach:      It is easy to find things in common between two texts from the same genre,  they will usually be organized similarly.   Comparing texts from different genres,  you will find that

  finding differences may seem to be simpler.  It is important that you pay attention to many factors when making comparisons,  pay attention to how it is organized.  Look for similar themes, characters and plots. 

 

Active Involvement:  Have students turn and talk about at least one similaritiy and one difference between the two books that you have chosen as an example. 

 

 

Link:    Today as you go back to your seats,  you will find a blank Venn Diagram and two books from different genres (two books that have already been shared as read alouds).  You may work with  a partner at your table to fill in the Venn Diagram about the two books at your table.

 

 

Share:  Invite pairs to share the Venn Diagrams that they were working on. 



 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 12:  Writing a comparison contrast on indepedent reading

Materials:

 


 

Connection:  Yesterday and today we have spent a good bit of times comparing books written by Tomie Depaola.  We are going to continue using the skills that we have learned and apply it to any book that you have the opportunity to read. 

 


 

Teach:   You can write a comparison/contrast piece of writing based on the books that you have read independently.  Choose two books from the same author that you have read,  or maybe you will want to choose two books from the same genre but that have different authors.  You will apply the same ideas into your writing as you did yesterday,  but to books that you have read independently.  You may even to choose to make a Venn diagram to help you along.

 

 



Active Involvement:  Ask students to Turn and Talk,  about two two books that they would like to use to write about that they have already read.  Ask them to explain to their partner why those two books make sense to use for this piece of writing. 

 


 

Link:    Today please choose two books that you have already read to write a compare/contrast writing about.  Be sure to include the name and author of the books as well as the genre of each book. 

 

 



Share: 
*************************************************************************************************************

 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 13:  Fix it up strategy-Clarify Confusion

Materials:

  Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka



Fix it up Bookmarks 

Fix it up Bookmarks 2
 

Connection:  Have you ever met someone who talked way too fast and it was hard to figure out what they were saying? What did you do to figure it out? Ask them to repeat, slow down, ask questions...Well readers do the same thing. They stop to clarify or figure out confusing parts of a story. Today we will practice stopping and trying several strategies when we get to a confusing part of the story.

 

Teach:   When we get to a page when we are confused you have to STOP and search for clarification clues to help you. What are some things you already know to do when you are lost?

 

Introduce these fix up strategies to help students who don’t understand ideas: Use bookmarks

Stop and think about what you have already read.

Reread.

Adjust your reading rate: slow down or speed up.

Try and connect the text to something you read in another book, what you know about the world, or to something you have experienced.

Visualize.

Reflect on what you have read.

Look at key words, bold print, italicized words, and punctuation.

Notice patterns in the text structure.

 

Begin reading Jamie O' Rourke. Stop and pause after the Pooka comes for the first time and model using various strategies. (rereading, thinking outloud about what just happened, making a connection, reflecting) Talk out how you read before/after, thought about what you know…Mainly that you use some strategy and don’t just KEEP READING.



 

Write vocab. words students don't know on a poster as you will revisit them tomorrow.



Active Involvement: 

  Keep reading and pause again after the Pooka comes again. Put bookmark and strategies on the ELMO and have them turn and talk about which to use to figure out what just happened again. (Focus on stopping and thinking about what they already read to understand why the Pooka is back.) 


 

Link:   

 

Pass out bookmarks and have students use bookmarks to help them figure out what strategy to use to figure out confusing parts of a story.



 

Share: 

  Have students discuss which strategies they use the most when they are confused.

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 13:  Letter to Tommy asking  25 cent ?s and sharing thoughts

 
 



Connection: 

  In Writers Workshop we have been writing changes and filling out a comparing and contrasting chart. As we are almost done with our Author study you have learned all about how Tomie writers stories. Today you are going to have a chance to write him a letter and share your thoughts and questions about his books. 


 

Teach:

   When you write to an author you first have to brainstorm good, deep thoughts or questions. We want 25 cent thoughts, not penny thoughts/questions. For example, lets say I wrote to Eric Carle. Penny questions are ones that have quick easy answer for the author such as, "Why did you make the caterpillar eat chocolate cake?" This type of question only has one main. We want to ask deeper questions and share our thoughts about the theme or similarities or differences in all his books. Such as, "I think it is a good idea to show how the animals go through change in your books. For example, the caterpillar eats all the food to grow into a butterfly and the tadpole changes into a frog.

 

Jot down several questions and thoughts. Do some penny thoughts and point those out and change into quarter thoughts. Possible books:Grouchy Ladybug-Penny, Why is the ladybug mean? Quarter-What happened to the ladybug to make him so mad?



 

Just as when we wrote persuasive letters, we are going to make sure we use details and evidence from his books when we ask or state our thoughts.

 

Model starting to write. Dear Eric Carle, We have been reading....state thought and questions.



Active Involvement: 

 

So how will you start your letter. State the heading to your partner. What kind of punctuation goes after his name? Share a thought or ? you may have about one of Tomie dePaola's books.  Ask if it is a penny or quarter question.


 

Link:   

 

  Now you will return to your seat and begin your letter sharing your thoughts and questions for Tomie about all of his books. You may need to brainstorm some questions and thoughts first before you start drafting. Use your journal to list ?s and then start when you have  3-4 good quarter thoughts.



 

Share:  Have several quarter thoughts share their thoughts and questions. Also,  call a penny thought and model how to change it into a quarter.

********************************************************************************************************************

 

Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Readers' Workshop



Lesson 14:  Fix it up-Vocabulary Words

Materials:

  Jamie O' Rourke and the Pooka



Clarify words bookmarks

 

Connection: 

 

Yesterday we used our bookmarks to help us when we come to confusing parts in a story. It is important that we try different strategies to figure out just what is happening. THE MOST IMPORTANT strategy is to read around the words and think about what is going on in that sentence: This is also called using the context clues. Today we will use this strategies and others when we come to hard words that we don't know the meaning.



 

Teach: Yesterday we read Jamie O'Rourke and wrote several words we didn't know the meaning for. Let's look back and several parts of the text and look for words we don't know the meaning for.  Model rereading parts of the story and writing unknown words.

 

Good words to use are: larder, commotion, cronies, obliged, ungrateful.



 

Stop and introduce strategies:

 

 I checked the parts of the word that I knew.



 

 I tried blending the sounds of the word together.

 

 I identified the prefix, suffix, and root words.



 

 I thought of other words I know and thought about what is going on

 

 I read on to look for clues.



 

 I tried another word that made sense.

 

 I reread the sentence to see if the word



 

Model on 2 of the words.


 

Active Involvement: 

  Now let's try this, invite students to use strategies for the words cronies and obliged.

 

Link:   

  Today as you read I want you to use the bookmark to help you as you come to words you that are unknown. Pass out bookmarks and have students use bookmarks to help them.

 

Share:  Have students share a difficult word and strategy they used to help them.

 

*************************************************************************************************************



Grade 2 Author Study: Tomie dePaola

 

  Writers' Workshop



Lesson 14:  Continued Letter, Fix up and check 25 cent questions with claims

Materials:

 

Teacher letter written from the previous WW.


 

Connection: 

  Yesterday you were brainstorming questions and thoughts to ask Tomie. We learned that good writers always reread and edit as they write. Today we will continue to draft and check to make sure we support and give clear details to explain our thoughts and questions.


 

Teach:

  Show your letter and point out your questions to Eric Carle. "I wondered why you made so many of your characters lonely?" Model how there is not support or claim to that question.

 

Add into the letter, In Fredrick and the Wind up Mouse, Fredrick was all alone in the house and everyone wanted to get him away even though he just wanted a crumb. Also, in the Very Lonely Firefly, the firefly didn't have anyone to glow with.  



 

Did you see how I asked a question and then explained why I wondered this?  

 

Finally, I added a closing to end my letter. Sincerely, Miss Evanko.



Active Involvement: 

  How would I add a claim or support to this thought I had in my letter? "I thought it was a good idea books that show how hard work pays off." What book titles or details can I add to make this a good thought with a claim? Very Hungry Caterpillar works hard to build cocoon, Very Busy Spider works on her web to catch food, Pancakes, Pancakes gathers and cooks it all.


 

Link:   

Today as you write and finish your letter make sure you gave a claim or support to explain WHY or what made you think or wonder. Then, reread your letter to make sure you have a opening, thoughts/questions with a support, and a closing.

 

 



Share: Have several students share the claims or support to their questions/thoughts.

*****************************************************************************************************************

 

DAY 15  Celebration





Readers' Workshop

Writers' Workshop

Lesson 1

All About Tomie

Chart what we know about Tomie dePaola

Lesson 2

Genre Review / Movement through Time

Intro to Response to Literature standards

letters, pausible claim, variation



Lesson 3

Attribute Chart

What is a plausible claim

Lesson 4

Theme with Evidence

Turning thoughts into writing (independent book)

Lesson 5

Theme with Evidence

On Tomie book Turn thoughts into writing sentence starters, transition words, examples

Lesson 6

Accountable Talk

Using questions for evidence of plausible claim

Lesson 7

Accountable Talk

Variations... What is it?, Examples, Discussion Group

Lesson 8

Cause / Effect (Inferring)

Variations, Model beginning writing with variation

Lesson 9

Penny / Quarter Questions, Chart items for discussions

Variation, Fix Up strategy

Lesson 10

Penny / Quarter Theme/Big Idea

Fix it up finish variation

Lesson 11

Compare/Contrast Text in same genre

Model how to write compare/constrast

Lesson 12

Compare /Contrast Text in different genre

write compare/contrast on independent reading

Lesson 13

Fix it up strategy--clarify

Letter to the author...deeper questions and thoughts

Lesson 14

Fix it up strategy --Vocabulary

Letter to the author Fix Up Strategy

 

  (In your attribute chart, the book titles should be covers of the book.)

 

Title

Genre

Characters

Setting

Theme

Noticings

Wonderings

Movement Through Time

Author's Craft

Strega Nona

folktale

People make mistakes, give them second chances.

Big Anthony

folktale

Believe in yourself when no one else does.

Nana Upstairs, Nana Downstairs

memoir

The cycle of life.

Now One Foot, Now the Other

realistic fiction

Anyone can be a teacher and a learner.

Oliver Button is a Sissy

realistic fiction

Accept everyone for who they are.

The Legend of the Bluebonnet

legend

Courage and sacrafice for the greater good.

Tom

memoir

Bonds between the old and young.

Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka

folktale

Take responsibility for you own actions.

 

 






The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page