Government Final Exam Multiple Choice



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Government Final Exam

Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. ANS: A

The Supremacy Clause prevents some conflicts between the states and the national government. It declares that the Constitution, along with the laws and treaties of the United States, are considered to be the supreme law of the land. This means that the Constitution stands above all other laws. Acts of Congress and treaties stand immediately beneath the Constitution.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.083

OBJ: 4.1.4 Examine the Constitution as “the supreme Law of the Land.” TOP: Federalism | Supremacy Clause


2. ANS: C

As committee members, senators and representatives screen proposed bills. They decide which measures will go on to floor consideration, where they can be acted upon by the full House or Senate.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.243

OBJ: 10.4.2 Describe the duties performed by those who serve in Congress. TOP: Congress | Senate Committee


3. ANS: A

Congress determines the President’s salary; currently, the President’s salary is $400,000 per year.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.368

OBJ: 13.1.4 Describe the President’s pay and benefits. TOP: The Presidency | Presidential Pay


4. ANS: D

If the office of Vice President becomes vacant, the 25th Amendment says that the President must nominate a Vice President. Both houses of Congress must confirm this nomination.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.321

OBJ: 13.2.3 Describe the role of the Vice President. TOP: The Presidency | The Vice Presidency


5. ANS: A

An amicus curiae brief allows someone who is not a party to a case, but who has a stake in the case, to present written arguments in support of one side in the dispute.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.257

OBJ: 9.3.2 Describe how lobbyists influence the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government.

TOP: Interest Groups | Amicus Curiae Brief
6. ANS: C

Neither corporations nor labor unions can contribute directly to any candidate running for a federal office. Their political action committees (PACs), however, can and do. Contributions from foreign sources are also banned.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.204-A.205

OBJ: 7.3.4 Outline the role of the Federal Election Commission in enforcing campaign finance laws.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Political Action Committee
7. ANS: C

According to the Framers’ plan, the President and Vice President are to be chosen by the electoral college, a special body of presidential electors chosen in each state.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.322-B.323

OBJ: 13.3.1 Explain the Framers’ original provisions for choosing the President.

TOP: The Presidency | The Electoral College
8. ANS: A

The Constitution requires that a senator must (1) be at least 30 years of age, (2) have been a citizen of the United States for at least nine years, and (3) be a resident of the state from which he or she is elected.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.241

OBJ: 10.3.4 Describe the qualifications for election to the Senate. TOP: Congress | Qualifications


9. ANS: A

The Constitution’s Privileges and Immunities Clause stipulates that no State can make unreasonable distinctions between its own and another State’s residents. However, the Clause does allow States to make reasonable distinctions between its residents and those of other States, as in the case of election residency requirements.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.114

OBJ: 4.3.4 Explain the purpose of the Privileges and Immunities Clause.

TOP: Federalism | Privileges and Immunities Clause
10. ANS: C

The presidential candidate’s acceptance speech caps the convention and launches the party’s general election campaign.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.384

OBJ: 13.4.4 Outline the events that take place during a national convention.

TOP: The Presidency | National Convention
11. ANS: A

The House has 435 members, while the Senate has only 100 members.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.281

OBJ: 10.3.1 Compare the size of the Senate to the size of the House of Representatives.

TOP: Congress | Senate
12. ANS: D

The Articles of Confederation established “a firm league of friendship” among the States. Each State kept its “sovereignty, freedom, and independence.” In effect, the Articles created a structure that more closely resembled an alliance of independent states than a government of the people.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.048

OBJ: 2.3.1 Describe the structure of the government set up under the Articles of Confederation.

TOP: Foundations of American Government | Articles of Confederation
13. ANS: D

Neither house of Congress may adjourn without the other’s consent. If the two houses cannot agree on a date for adjournment, Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution gives the President the power to prorogue, or end, the session, but no President has ever had to use that power.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.271

OBJ: 10.1.3 Describe a situation in which the President may convene or end a session of Congress.

TOP: President | Prorogue
14. ANS: C

As chief legislator, the President shapes public policy. In this role, the President may suggest that Congress enact laws he believes are needed.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.315 OBJ: 13.1.1 Describe the President’s many roles.

TOP: The Presidency | Chief Legislator


15. ANS: A

One part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 gave federal officers the power to oversee the conduct of elections in certain states.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.129

OBJ: 6.1.2 Identify and explain constitutional restrictions on the States’ power to set voting qualifications.

TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | Voting Rights Act of 1965
16. ANS: C

The Constitution states that the National Government must protect each State against invasion. The federal system may also send troops into a State at the governor’s request and can aid areas stricken by nature. However, the National Government must recognize the physical boundaries of each State.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.104

OBJ: 4.2.1 Summarize the obligations that the Constitution places on the National Government with regard to the States.

TOP: Federalism | The Constitution
17. ANS: A

Historical events can have a major impact on the views of large numbers of Americans. The social turmoil of the 1960s and 1970s, combined with events such as the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal, eroded many Americans’ confidence in the trustworthiness of the U.S. government.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.219

OBJ: 8.1.3 Describe four other factors that shape public opinion.

TOP: Mass Media and Public Opinion | Historical Events
18. ANS: C

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is an independent agency that is part of the executive branch. Congress set it up in 1974 to administer all federal laws concerning campaign finance. These laws are not well enforced because the FEC does not have a large enough staff or enough funding.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.171

OBJ: 7.3.4 Outline the role of the Federal Election Commission in enforcing campaign finance laws.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Federal Election Commission
19. ANS: D

Although Franklin admitted that the Constitution might have faults, he said that he doubted “whether any other Convention we can obtain, may be able to make a better Constitution. For when you assemble a number of men to have the advantage of their joint wisdom, you inevitably assemble with those men, all their prejudices, their passions, their errors of opinion, their local interests, and their selfish views.”

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.058

OBJ: 2.4.4 Describe the delegates’ reactions to the Constitution. TOP: The Constitution | Benjamin Franklin


20. ANS: A

The Articles of Confederation did not give the Congress the power to tax or to regulate trade between the States. The Congress also did not have the power to make the States obey the Articles or the laws it made. These weaknesses led to disunity among the States.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.049-A.050

OBJ: 2.3.2 Explain why the weaknesses of the Articles led to a critical period for the government in the 1780s.

TOP: Foundations of American Government | Articles of Confederation
21. ANS: B

A dictatorship is usually a one-party system because the ruling party does not allow opposing parties to exist.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.106

OBJ: 5.1.4 Understand multiparty and one-party systems and how they affect the functioning of a political system.

TOP: Political Parties | One-Party System
22. ANS: D

Election results show what the people are thinking and may also show approval for a political party. After a successful election, the winning party may claim to have a mandate. That means that the party believes the public has given it the approval to carry out its campaign promises.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.186

OBJ: 8.2.1 Describe the challenges involved in measuring public opinion. TOP: Mass Media and Public Opinion | Mandate


23. ANS: A

The direct primary—an election held within a party to pick that party’s candidates for the general election—is the principal nominating method in American politics today.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.187-A.188

OBJ: 7.1.3 Discuss the direct primary as the principal nominating method used in the United States today.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Direct Primary
24. ANS: D

Congress does not have the power to regulate the use of money in State and local elections. However, it does regulate the use of money in presidential and congressional campaigns.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.203-A.204

OBJ: 7.3.3 Examine federal laws that regulate campaign finance.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Campaign Finance Laws
25. ANS: D

Federal judges may be removed from office only through the impeachment process, which involves conviction and removal by the Senate.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.525

OBJ: 18.1.3 Outline the process for appointing federal judges, and list their terms of office.

TOP: The Judiciary | Federal Judges
26. ANS: A

Political parties nominate candidates and control the election process.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.070

OBJ: 3.3.3 Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

TOP: The Constitution | Political Parties
27. ANS: A

The 22nd Amendment was written to prevent any individual from being elected to the presidency more than twice. It was passed in the aftermath of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s third and fourth elections to the presidency in the 1940s, which broke the unwritten “no-third-term” custom.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.367

OBJ: 13.1.3 Explain how the President’s term of office has changed over time.

TOP: The Presidency | Presidential Term
28. ANS: D

Millions of Americans do not vote or only vote for some offices. Many of these nonvoters have no interest in politics.

PTS: 5 DIF: L2 REF: B.145

OBJ: 6.4.1 Examine the problem of nonvoting in this country. TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | Nonvoters


29. ANS: C

The election of 1800 introduced three new elements into the electoral process: party nominations for the presidency and vice presidency; the nomination of candidates for presidential electors in the States pledged to vote for their party’s presidential ticket; and the automatic casting of the electoral votes in line with those pledges.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.375-A.376

OBJ: 13.3.2 Understand how the rise of political parties changed the process of choosing a President as set out in the Constitution.

TOP: The Presidency | The Electoral Process
30. ANS: B

With nomination by petition, candidates are nominated by means of petitions signed by a certain number of qualified voters in the election district.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.192

OBJ: 7.1.4 Understand why some candidates use the petition as a nominating device.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Petition
31. ANS: D

The U.S. government is a federal system. That means powers are divided between the national government and the states.

PTS: 5 DIF: L2 REF: B.010

OBJ: 1.2.3 Identify different ways that power can be distributed, geographically, within a state.

TOP: Forms of Government | Federalism
32. ANS: C

The four characteristics of the state are population, territory, sovereignty, and government.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.005

OBJ: 1.1.2 Describe the four defining characteristics of the state. TOP: Forms of Government | State


33. ANS: A

A peer group is made up of people with whom one regularly associates, including friends, classmates, neighbors, and coworkers. A person’s peer group is able to influence the attitudes of group members because of the trust that is shared within the group.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.184

OBJ: 8.1.3 Describe four other factors that shape public opinion.

TOP: Mass Media and Public Opinion | Peer Group
34. ANS: C

Although there were many disagreements between the two plans, the most important one involved the representation of the States in Congress. The Virginia Plan proposed basing State representation on population or financial contributions, while the New Jersey Plan called for equal representation for each State.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.054-A.055

OBJ: 2.4.2 Compare and contrast the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan.

TOP: The Constitution | Virginia and New Jersey Plans
35. ANS: D

The New Jersey Plan called for a single house of Congress, with each of the states equally represented. The smaller states favored this plan because they feared that representation based on population or financial contributions would allow larger states to dominate the new government.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.038

OBJ: 2.4.2 Compare and contrast the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan.

TOP: The Constitution | New Jersey Plan
36. ANS: D

Due to time constraints and the volume of news to be conveyed, television seldom gives the kind of in-depth coverage that a good newspaper can supply.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.236

OBJ: 8.3.3 Understand the factors that limit the influence of the media.

TOP: Mass Media and Public Opinion | Television
37. ANS: A

The Senate is a continuous body, which means that all Senate seats are never up for election at the same time. Only one-third of the Senate membership is up for election every two years.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.283

OBJ: 10.3.3 Explain how and why a senator’s term differs from a representative’s term.

TOP: Congress | Senate
38. ANS: A

In the States where an absolute majority (rather than a plurality) of votes is needed for a candidate to win a primary election, a runoff primary will be held when no one wins a majority in a race. In that runoff, the top vote getters in the first primary face one another for the party’s nomination, with the winner becoming the nominee.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.190

OBJ: 7.1.3 Discuss the direct primary as the principal nominating method used in the United States today.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Runoff Primary
39. ANS: A

Many think the registration requirement should be abolished because it is a bar to voting, especially by the poor and less educated.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.159-A.160

OBJ: 6.2.2 Explain the other requirements that States use or have used as voting qualifications.

TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | Registration
40. ANS: C

The Articles of Confederation established “a firm league of friendship” among the states. Each state kept its “sovereignty, freedom, and independence.” In other words, the states controlled most of their own affairs.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.033-B.034

OBJ: 2.3.1 Describe the structure of the government set up under the Articles of Confederation. | 2.3.2 Explain why the weaknesses of the Articles led to a critical period for the government in the 1780s.

TOP: Foundations of American Government | Articles of Confederation
41. ANS: B

Duties are required of every citizen; responsibilities are only strongly encouraged. Thus, actions such as serving on a jury, attending school, and respecting others’ rights are duties; voting and volunteering are responsibilities.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.023

OBJ: 1.3.1 Understand the foundations of democracy. TOP: Democracy | Citizen


42. ANS: B

Duties are required of every citizen. Responsibilities are only strongly encouraged. Obeying the law is a duty.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.015

OBJ: 1.3.1 Understand the foundations of democracy. TOP: Democracy | Citizenship


43. ANS: B

Senators’ terms are staggered, so that only a third of the seats are up for election every two years. There is no limit on the number of terms a senator may serve, but this is also true of the House.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.241 OBJ: 10.3.2 Describe how senators are elected.

TOP: Congress | Senate


44. ANS: A

The Supreme Court is the only court specifically created by the Constitution, in Article III, Section 1. The Constitution leaves to Congress the creation of the inferior courts, which include both the constitutional courts and the special courts.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.520-A.521

OBJ: 18.1.1 Explain  why the Constitution created a national judiciary, and describe its structure.

TOP: The Judiciary | Supreme Court
45. ANS: D

Each party’s national convention meets to name its presidential candidate, hopes to unify the party behind its candidates, and adopts the party’s platform. Party delegates are not selected at the convention, however, and each party has its own rules governing delegate selection.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.381-A.382

OBJ: 13.4.3 Understand the caucus-convention process. TOP: The Presidency | Convention


46. ANS: B

Voters are required to register mainly to prevent people from voting more than once.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.134

OBJ: 6.2.2 Explain the other requirements that States use or have used as voting qualifications.

TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | Voter Registration
47. ANS: B

Supporters of splinter parties were once part of a major party. Examples include the Progressive Party, States’ Rights (Dixiecrat) Party, and the American Independent Party.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.114

OBJ: 5.3.1 Identify the types of minor parties that have been active in American politics.

TOP: Political Parties | Splinter Parties
48. ANS: C

Propaganda is a technique of persuasion that relies on creating beliefs among the audience.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.259

OBJ: 9.3.4 Identify how interest groups use media, propaganda, and political campaigns to influence public opinion and policy.

TOP: Interest Groups | Propaganda
49. ANS: B

The electoral college system has three major flaws: the winner of the popular vote is not guaranteed the presidency; electors are not required to vote in agreement with the popular vote; and any election might have to be decided in the House of Representatives.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.389

OBJ: 13.5.3 Identify several flaws in the electoral college system. TOP: The Presidency | Electoral College


50. ANS: B

The Constitution prevents states from entering into any treaty, alliance, or confederation. However, the states can enter into interstate compacts with the consent of Congress.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.091

OBJ: 4.3.1 Examine why States form interstate compacts. TOP: Federalism | Interstate Compact


51. ANS: C

The Federalists believed the National Government should be made stronger, while Anti-Federalists wanted to reserve more power for the States.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.130-A.131

OBJ: 5.2.1 Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.

TOP: Political Parties | Federalists and Anti-Federalists
52. ANS: A

The 24th Amendment forbids States from requiring payment of any tax as a condition for taking part in the nomination or election of any federal officeholder.

PTS: 5 DIF: L3/L4 REF: A.155

OBJ: 6.1.2 Identify and explain constitutional restrictions on the States’ power to set voting qualifications.

TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | 24th Amendment
53. ANS: D

Each President may serve a maximum of two full terms—eight years—in office. A President who succeeds to the office after the midpoint in a term could finish out the predecessor’s term and then be elected to two full terms, for a total of 10 years in office.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.367

OBJ: 13.1.3 Explain how the President’s term of office has changed over time.

TOP: The Presidency | Presidential Term
54. ANS: C

Concurrent jurisdiction is the shared power of state and federal courts to hear certain cases.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.446

OBJ: 18.1.2 Identify the criteria that determine whether a case is within the jurisdiction of a federal court, and compare the types of jurisdiction. TOP: The Judiciary | Jurisdiction


55. ANS: B

Property ownership requirements for voting were eliminated in the early 1800s.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.129

OBJ: 6.1.1 Summarize the history of voting rights in the United States. TOP: Voters and Voter Behavior | Suffrage


56. ANS: A

After the Constitution was written, controversy arose surrounding it. Some people believed that a guarantee of individual rights and freedoms was absolutely essential to limit the power of the new national government proposed by the Framers. Many people refused to support the Constitution unless the Bill of Rights was added to it.

PTS: 5 DIF: L2 REF: B.063

OBJ: 3.2.3 Understand that several amendments have been proposed, but not ratified.

TOP: The Constitution | Bill of Rights
57. ANS: A

The Constitution gives the President the power to appoint Supreme court justices. Once the President makes the appointment, the Senate must confirm it.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.446

OBJ: 18.1.3 Outline the process for appointing federal judges, and list their terms of office.

TOP: The Judiciary | Supreme Court
58. ANS: C

A national convention has three main goals: 1) naming the party’s presidential and vice presidential candidates, 2) promoting party unity, and 3) adopting the party’s platform.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.328

OBJ: 13.4.4 Outline the events that take place during a national convention.

TOP: The Presidency | National Conventions
59. ANS: B

A caucus is a nominating device in which a group of like-minded people meet to select the candidates they will support in an upcoming election. In the early history of the United States, caucuses were usually small groups of influential people.

PTS: 3 DIF: L3 REF: A.185

OBJ: 7.1.2 Describe self-announcement, the caucus, and the convention as nominating methods.

TOP: The Electoral Process | Caucus
60. ANS: D

In the United States, a presidential election is held every four years. Wars and other crises have never prevented an election.

PTS: 3 DIF: L2 REF: B.331

OBJ: 13.5.1 Describe the features of the presidential campaign. TOP: The Presidency | The Electoral Process


61. ANS: A

Appellate courts review only issues of law. Their judges cannot ask for new facts to be presented. They may overrule or modify the decision of the lower court or send a case back to a lower court for a new trial.

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