Global Citizenship Sample Graduation Proficiencies & Performance Indicators



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Global Citizenship
Sample Graduation Proficiencies & Performance Indicators



VT content area Graduation Proficiencies & Performance Indicators:


  • Are required by Section 2120.8 of the education quality standards

  • Reflect existing learning standards required by the VT State Board of Education, under the VT Framework of Standards (CCSS, NGSS, and GEs)

  • are designed to be used in conjunction with the VT Transferable Skills Graduation Proficiencies, which outline students’ desired skills and habits across content areas

  • Include three sets of performance indicators differentiated by grade cluster— elementary, middle, and high school

  • serve as benchmarks of learning progression for elementary and middle school


This document is designed to:

  • Assist Vermont schools and Districts/SUs in developing learning requirements and expectations for their students

  • Promote consistency across schools and Districts/SUs for Transfer Students

  • Increase personalization and flexibility for instruction and learning

  • Help build curriculum and steer assessment development

  • Support formative assessment practices, including performance assessment

  • Simultaneously provide data and insight into achievement when aligned with the transferable skills

  • Support student achievement of the expected content standards




Graduation Proficiencies

Performance Indicators—Elementary School

Performance Indicators—Middle School

Performance Indicators—High School

1. INQUIRY

1A. Students make sense of the world around them through questioning.



  1. Ask relevant and focused questions based on what they have seen, what they have read, what they have listened to, and/or what they have researched.

a.Ask focused, probing, and significant questions that encourage inquiry around an issue of personal, community, or global relevance.

  1. Ask focused, probing, and significant questions that encourage inquiry around an issue of personal, community, or global relevance.

1B. Students analyze information to develop reasonable explanations that support inquiry.


  1. Determine the validity and reliability of the document or information.

  2. Revise explanations as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, and/or expert opinion.

  3. Explain the relevance of their findings.

  4. Propose solutions to problems and ask other questions.

  1. Determine the validity and reliability of the document or information.

  2. Revise explanations as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, and/or expert opinion.

  3. Propose solutions to problems based on findings, and ask additional questions.

  1. Determine the validity and reliability of the document or information.

  2. Revise explanations as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, and/or expert opinion.

  3. Predict and/or recommend how conclusions can be applied to other civic, economic or social issues.

  4. Propose solutions to problems based on findings, and ask additional questions.

1C. Students communicate in ways that foster the exchange of ideas in a democratic society.


  1. Give an oral, written, or visual presentation that summarizes findings.

  2. Define their own rights and needs – and the rights and needs of others – in the classroom, school, and community.

  1. Solicit and respond to feedback.

  2. Identify possibilities for continued or further research.

  3. After examining issues from more than one perspective, define and defend the rights and needs of others in the community, nation, and world.

  1. Solicit and respond to feedback.

  2. Identify possibilities for continued or further research.

  3. After examining issues from more than one perspective, define and defend the rights and needs of others in the community, nation, and world.

2. HISTORY

Students use historical inquiry, including the use of primary and secondary sources, to gather information about the past that will help them make sense of the present and decisions about the future.




  1. Explain differences between historic and present day objects and identify how the use of the object may have changed over time.

  2. Identify and use various sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and others.

  3. Differentiate among fact, opinion, and interpretation.

  4. Make predictions and/or decisions based on an understanding of the past and the present.

  5. Identify an important event in the local community and/or Vermont, and describe a cause and an effect of that event.

  6. Examine how communities throughout time have promoted human rights and explain the importance to present-day life.

  1. Describe how life in the United States and/or the world has both changed and stayed the same over time; explain why these changes have occurred.

  2. Identify different types of primary and secondary sources.

  3. Evaluate the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s).

  4. Identify how technology can lead to a different interpretation of history.

  5. Make predictions and/or decisions based on an understanding of the past and the present.

  6. Identify important events in the United States and/or world, and describe multiple causes and effects of those events.

  7. Analyze a current or historic issue related to human rights, and explain how the values of the time or place influenced the issue.

  1. Explain historical origins of key ideas and concepts and how they are reinterpreted over time.

  2. Locate appropriate primary and secondary sources to support a historical inquiry.

  3. Evaluate the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s), both past and present.

  4. Use technology to support a historical inquiry.

  5. Make predictions, decisions, or take a public stand based on an understanding of the past and present.

  6. Identify why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time.

  7. Analyze the impact of a current or historic issue related to human rights, and explain how the values of the time or place influenced the issue.

3. GEOGRAPHY

Students propose solutions to local and world issues by using geographic tools to analyze data and examine cultural information.



  1. Observe, compare, and analyze patterns of national and global land use to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities.


  2. Interpret a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs.

  3. Evaluate different viewpoints regarding resource use in the U.S. & world.

  4. Describe the contributions of various cultural groups to Vermont and the U.S.


  5. Identify ways in which culture in Vermont has changed.




  1. Observe, compare, and analyze patterns of national and global land use over time to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities; speculate as to which areas might be used in the future and the impact of that usage.


  2. Interpret a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs.


  3. Investigate a community or state environmental issue.


  4. Describe the contributions of various cultural groups to the world, both past and present.

  5. Analyze how location and spatial patterns influence the spread of culture.

  1. Observe, compare, and analyze patterns of national and global land use over time to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities; speculate as to which areas might be used in the future and the impact of that usage.

  2. Interpret and analyze a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs.

  3. Gather information and analyze different viewpoints regarding resources use in the U.S. and world in order to draw conclusions and recommend actions.

  4. Analyze the contributions of various cultural groups to the world, both past and present, including immigrants and native peoples.

  5. Analyze how location, spatial patterns, and technology influence the spread of cultural traits and hypothesize about the impact of the globalization of culture.

4. CIVICS, GOVERNMENT & SOCIETY

Students act as citizens by understanding how governments function and by exercising their rights and responsibilities within their current societal structure(s).




  1. Identify the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a school and local community.


  2. Explain what makes a just rule or law.

  3. Know the basic rules and laws for school and community.

  4. Describe how characteristics of good leadership and fair decision-making affect others.

  5. Explain their own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society.

  6. Identify problems; plan and implement solutions in the classroom, school or community.

  7. Identify examples of interdependence among individuals and groups.

  1. Explain conflicts and ways in which they can be resolved peacefully.

  1. Describe the basic principles of American democracy.

  2. Describe how rules and laws are created.

  3. Identify key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them.

  4. Describe how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.

  5. Explain and defend their own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society; use information gained from reputable sources.

  6. Illustrate how individuals and groups have brought about change locally, nationally, or internationally.

  7. Identify examples of interdependence among states and nations.

  8. Explain conflicts and ways in which they can be resolved peacefully.




  1. Identify and debate issues surrounding the basic principles of American democracy.

  2. Evaluate how and why rules and laws are created, interpreted, and changed; establish rules and/or policies for a group, school, or community.

  3. Analyze the principles in key U.S. and international documents and how they apply to their own lives.

  4. Describe how government decisions directly impact citizens locally, nationally, and internationally.

  5. Explain and defend their own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society; use information gained from reputable sources; explain, critically evaluate, and defend views that are not one’s own.

  6. Illustrate how individuals and groups have brought about change locally, nationally, or internationally.

  7. Analyze the impact of interdependence among states and nations.

  8. Explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict within and among individuals, communities, and nations; propose and defend ways to ease tensions and/or peacefully resolve conflicts.

5. ECONOMICS

Students make economic decisions through their understanding of the interaction between humans, the environment, government, and the economy.



  1. Trace the production, distribution, and consumption of goods in Vermont.

  2. Describe how producers in Vermont have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services.

  3. Describe the cause and effect relationship between economic activities and the environment in Vermont.

  4. Examine factors that influence supply and demand.

  5. Explain ways people meet their basic needs and wants.

  6. Compare prices of goods and services.

  7. Explain how people save.




  1. Explain how goods and services around the world create economic interdependence between people in different places.



  1. Examine how producers in the U.S. and/or world have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services and compare and contrast the findings.

  2. Draw conclusions about how choices within an economic system affect the environment in the state, nation, and/or world.

  3. Define and apply basic economic concepts such as supply and demand, price, market and/or opportunity cost in an investigation of a regional, national, or international economic question or problem.

  4. Examine the causes and long-term effects of people’s needs and/or wants exceeding their available resources, and propose possible solutions.

  5. Compare price, quality, and features of goods and services.

  6. Analyze influences on buying and saving.

  1. Explain patterns and networks of economic interdependence that exist nationally and globally.


  2. Examine how producers in the U.S. and/or world have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services, and predict the long-term effects of these uses.



  1. Draw conclusions about how choices within various economic systems affect the environment in the state, nation, and/or world; evaluate and debate the ideological underpinnings of government and economic programs.


  2. Analyze and interpret global economic issues and problems through an economic lens.


  3. Examine the causes and long term effects of people’s needs and/or wants exceeding their available resources, and propose possible solutions.


  4. Develop and utilize a budget.


  5. Analyze the impact of media on buying, spending, and saving.

6. WORLD LANGUAGES
6A. Students show skill development in various forms of non-native language communication.


  1. Express oneself in the present with simple sentences, memorized connectors, and descriptive vocabulary.


  2. Perform short skits, plays, etc. using familiar or memorized vocabulary.


  3. Respond to increasingly complex prompts by labeling, matching, dramatization, drawing, and/or retelling.


  4. Recognize more sound/symbol/meaning relationships.


  5. Respond with details to personal and content questions.





  1. Express oneself in the present using basic sentence structures, more descriptive details and short paragraphs including adjectives, connecting words, and adverbs.


  2. Create short oral and written texts, using familiar vocabulary.


  3. Perform short skits, plays, recitations, etc.


  4. Narrate a simple story.


  5. Use a greater number of characters.


  6. Respond to increasingly complex prompts by labeling, dramatization, drawing, retelling,
    graphing, mapping, and ranking.


  7. Recognize more sound/symbol/meaning relationships.


  8. Respond to questions about personal and presented material in detail (who, what, when, where, how and why).


  9. Apply reading strategies (e.g., guessing words from context, using prior knowledge, format, and illustrations).




  1. Participate fully in conversations, improvised dialogue, interviews, etc. by asking a variety of questions and making extended statements.


  2. Express different types of thinking ideas on various topics using writing strategies.


  3. Create a variety of oral and written texts; report, narrate, and describe using connected sentences and longer forms of discourse..


  4. Perform plays, recitations, etc.


  5. Use a greater number of characters.


  6. Recognize more sound/symbol/meaning relationships.


  7. Apply reading strategies to extract the main idea and separate fact from opinion.


  8. Analyze presented material on various topics by ranking, giving personal response, categorizing; compare and contrast, show cause and effect and defend a hypothesis.

6B. Students demonstrate understanding of customs, beliefs, cultural differences, and traditions worldwide.

  1. Without value judgment, identify and describe characteristics of diverse expressions of target cultures; locate these cultures on a map or globe.


  2. Dramatize or present a cultural practice using authentic words.


  3. Demonstrate use of authentic cultural objects and practices in specific contexts and purposes.

  1. Describe, compare and contrast cultural expressions in target culture and own culture.


  2. Dramatize or present various products and practices using authentic words.


  3. Demonstrate use of authentic cultural objects and practices related to presented materials and activities.

  1. Make inferences and ask questions about a culture based on cultural practices and symbols; explain how some cultural expressions can be charged with embedded meaning.


  2. Use acronyms and abbreviations.


  3. Create representations (e.g., dramatizations, collage, performances that show importance of products and practices).


  4. Use words and gestures in cultural games, role plays and skits, including folktales and proverbs.


  5. Identify cultural issues in presented material.




6C. Students access new information through using a non-native language and experiencing its culture.


  1. Participating in interdisciplinary activities (e.g., singing, dancing, painting, counting, creating visual art, using musical instruments).




  1. Using target language for learning another academic discipline, (e.g., identifying currency and making change).




  1. Identifying cultural context of children’s books, movies, magazines, and TV programs, etc


  2. Using authentic material from the culture for discovery.





  1. Participating in interdisciplinary activities (e.g., singing, dancing, painting, computing, creating visual art, playing musical instruments).




  1. Using target language for learning another academic discipline (e.g., converting weights and measures; researching famous people).




  1. Using technology and reference materials in the target language to research information needed in other disciplines.




  1. Discussing possible relationship between cultural perspectives and expressive products (e.g., music, visual arts, and appropriate forms of literature, etc.).




  1. Greeting, introducing, asking questions of, and corresponding with native speakers.




  1. Experiencing and discussing literature

  1. Participating in interdisciplinary activities (e.g., singing, dancing, painting, counting, creating visual art, playing musical instruments, participating in a play).



  2. Using target language for learning another academic discipline by identifying and discussing national social, health, and cultural issues (e.g., immigration and decolonization in target country).



  3. Acquiring new cultural and political viewpoints through technology, resource materials and original sources in the language.



  4. Engaging in sustained verbal or written conversation on an assigned topic with a native or fluent speaker.




  1. Interpreting literature and art works from a variety of viewpoints (e.g., historical, aesthetic, cultural, technical, political).




6D. Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own.


  1. Recognizing word order differences.




  1. Identifying grammatical notions of gender.




  1. Using formal and informal language in predictable, teacher directed situations.




  1. Identifying and translating cognates.




  1. Identifying non-verbal behavior patterns (e.g., shrugs, eye contact, use of personal space).




  1. Comparing syntax and sentence structure.




  1. Identifying grammatical notions of agreement (gender, number, subject, verb).




  1. Using formal and informal language in appropriate contexts.




  1. Identifying words borrowed from the target language and their meaning.




  1. Identifying and using root words (e.g., venir/ bien venue).




  1. Demonstrating verbal and non-verbal behavior patterns.



  1. Comparing different ranges of meaning in the two languages (e.g., verb tenses, subjunctive mood, idioms).




  1. Using correctly grammatical notions of agreement (gender, number, subject, verb).




  1. Identifying different forms of language (dialect, slang, informal expressions).




  1. Identifying characteristics of cognates and root words (e.g., - ity words in English are -ite, in French or -idad, in Spanish, -ität in German.




  1. Demonstrating appropriate verbal and non-verbal behavior patterns

6E. Students show understanding of how language and cultural knowledge influences their lives.


  1. Participating in authentic games, sports, and activities (music, crafts) attending or viewing a cultural event to foster enjoyment of learning the language.




  1. Applying problem solving skills to non-native language learning situations (e.g., using words that are familiar, accessing prior knowledge, using authentic re- sources; communicating directly in target language).




  1. Using peers and advanced or native speakers to practice and validate language use.



  1. Participating in authentic games, sports and activities (music, crafts) planning a trip , attending or viewing a cultural event, exploring international websites , to foster enjoyment of learning the language.




  1. Applying problem solving skills to non-native language learning situations (e.g., using words that are familiar, accessing prior knowledge, consulting authentic resources; communicating directly in target language).



  2. Using peers and advanced or native speakers to practice and validate language use.

  1. Identifying opportunities for lifelong involvement with the target language, camps, work experiences, travel, media, community conversation groups, internet, study abroad opportunities to foster enjoyment of learning the language).




  1. Applying problem solving skills to non-native language learning situations (e.g., using words that are familiar, accessing prior knowledge, consulting authentic resources; communicating directly in target language).




  1. Using peers and advanced or native speakers to practice and validate language use.







Based on Vermont Grade Expectations in History & Social Sciences and Non-Native Language





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