General education: common core course descriptions summer 2016



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GENERAL EDUCATION: COMMON CORE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - SUMMER 2016

Comprehensive List - Updated 03/09/2016



Additional courses will be posted as they become available.
All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.

Please Note: Courses, times, and topics are subject to change.

Check the Schedule of Classes at iusb.edu for the most current information.

ART, AESTHETICS, AND CREATIVITY A 190

ENG-A 190 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

MY DAILY LIFE EXTRAORDINAIRE!

Description: This course explores artistic interventions within the fabric of everyday life. We will first start by rediscovering and reclaiming objects of our daily lives to give them a renewed sense of purpose and meaning. Literary texts, the study of graphic design, and art works will help spark our artistic launch. The second half of the semester is dedicated to the study and production of slide shows. Originally, slide shows – the old-fashioned kind using a carousel – were both a high-tech form of family entertainment and an artistic medium used by experimental artists from the 1960s onward. You may be asked to produce your own slide show using Power Point and to screen it for public viewing at IUSB.

14290 SS1 1:00-4:15P TR


FINA-A 190 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

POINT AND SHOOT: AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

This introductory level course will explore digital technology for capturing, enhancing, and producing still lens-based images. The course will address the visual language of camera-generated images, computer output techniques, the connoisseurship of digital image output as well as basic digital camera operations. The course assumes no prior knowledge or experience with digital imaging technologies or materials. Students must provide a digital camera. TEXT: Stone & London, a short Course in Digital Photography Prentice Hall, 2009.

13268 SS1 ONLINE

13368 SS1 ONLINE

13369 SS1 ONLINE

13252 SS2 1:00-4:15P TR

14261 SS2 ONLINE

THTR-A 190 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

This introductory course examines the theatre, plays and playwriting, the actor, designers and technicians, the director, traditions of the theatre, the modern theatre, musical theatre, the future of theatre, and the critic. This is a participatory class.

12135 SS1 9:00-12:15P TR

13611 SS2 ONLINE

ART, AESTHETICS, AND CREATIVITY A 390/399

ENG-A 399 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

BERLIN & PRAGUE: HISTORY, LITERATURE, CULTURE: EUROPEAN CITIES AS SITES OF COLLAGE

Combined with HIST-T 190)

This study abroad course explores two fascinating European cities: Berlin and Prague. Three weeks of coursework at IU South Bend will focus on the history, literature, culture, and art of Berlin in Prague. Then in 15 days in Europe, students have a chance to visit these cities and experience the history first hand, for example to explore the Prague castle where Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II conducted scientific experiments or walk with the lines on the ground that marked the former Berlin wall. HIST‐T190 will provide an overview of Berlin & Prague from the 1500s to the present, providing context for the tensions between the two cities in the 20th century. In the coordinating class led by Professor Kelcey Parker, ENG‐A399, students study the literature of these two cities and create collages in course journals, in the process gaining a new understanding of Prague and Berlin as sites of collage.

13449 SS1 9:00-12:15 TR

FINA-A 399 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN FLORENCE

In this four-week workshop, students will explore Florence and surroundings by sketching, drawing, and experimenting with sculptural ideas. At SRISA students will have access to painting facilities, classrooms, and gallery space to further develop their creative ideas into projects. Classes will be held four days a week with opportunities to tour the city’s museums and monuments. Part of the time we will work on location, from direct observation in museums, gardens, and piazzas.

13417 PERMSS1 OC

AMERICAN LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY: AHISTORY & PRACTICE

This 300 level course will explore landscape photography. The course will address the visual language of camera-generated images, the history of landscape images and the dialogue of contemporary landscape photography. Course work will include lecture and discussion of historical and contemporary images. Students will produce landscape images and write and talk about their images as well as images made by their peers. Students will develop an understanding of landscape images in relation to history, culture and society. The course assumes no prior knowledge or experience with digital imaging technologies or materials. Students must provide a digital camera.

14262 SS2 ONLINE
THTR-T-A 399 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

16410 TBA ELKHART



13411 TBA ELKHART
HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS B 190

BUS-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS AMINISTRATION

Business organizations play an important role in our lives. We interact with businesses in a variety of ways, including as employees, consumers, and investors. One form of business organization—corporations—wield enormous power. Given the pervasiveness of business in our lives, one intention of this class is to help you make greater sense of the world in which you live and enable you to make better informed decisions. In particular, W100 introduces you to a wide range of management issues. This will help to prepare you for other business classes that you may take and for your career. Or, for nonbusiness students, it will give you a useful overview of key business issues and the context within which businesses operate. Also this class may help you choose your career by making you aware of key features of: business trends, business ownership, business management, management of human resources, marketing, and managing financial resources.

13324 SS1 WB WEB

14642 SS2 1:00-4:15P MW
ANTH-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY

14263 SS2 ONLINE

POLS-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INTRODUCING GLOBALIZATION

This course offers an analysis of globalization that addresses what is happening to us personally as well as

economically amidst the market-led processes of global integration. The focus is on the ways macro-economic

reforms such as free trade agreements and privatization initiatives have come together with much more micro

innovations in how personal behavior is organized by market forces such as rethinking education as a personal

investment practice, for example. Mediating between these macro and micro scales of capitalist transformation are a

wide array of other market-based mechanisms that are examined in the course, ranging from bond risk ratings to the

market metrics shaping FICO scores, to personalized medicine and online mapping. Tracing these developments

with an awareness of their material geographic variation and unevenness, the course offers an alternative to

economistic assumptions about choice-maximizing behavior on a ‘level playing field’. It explores instead the

complex uneven development dynamics of globalization in ways that allow students to see how their own personal

perspectives on these dynamics are at once outcomes and enablers of economic and social change. By doing so, the

course aims at enabling students to be more engaged participants in the ongoing debates over the direction these

dynamics should take.

14344 SS1 1:00-4:15P MW

MEDIA, FRAMING AND POLITICS

In 2013, a public opinion poll found that only twenty-­‐eight percent of over four thousand respondents felt that journalists contributed “a lot” to society. This is reflective of a trend in which mass media, although present in most citizens’ everyday lives, is widely distrusted and even despised. This is particularly true in the case of American national politics, where media has played an influential “fourth branch” role with regard to checks and balances. With the onset of cable news and the rising influence of outlets such as talk radio and internet blogs, the political media has grown increasingly partisan, encouraging what scholars have called “narrowcasting”—a situation where citizens expose themselves to self-­‐selected, and ideologically-­‐pleasing, sources of news. At the same time, largely internet-­‐based new media have reshaped the political landscape. Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, and other social networking sites are ubiquitous in discussions of politics. They have affected political dialogue, election campaigning, reporting, and democracy. Such new technologies bring citizens closer to politics and provide new outlets for engaging the political process. Regardless of the form of media one chooses to engage, all sources are contributing frames, or perspectives on political developments—this may include at times, basic partisan frames, but goes much further than this surface-­‐level analysis. The course will discuss the role of media framing, the power of the media to set the political agenda, and the role of citizens in both evaluating and engaging various forms of media.

14346 SS2 5:30-8:45P MW

PSY-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

DEATH AND LIFE LESSONS

This course focuses on death and end-of-life issues within a variety of perspectives, including historical, biomedical, multicultural, and religious theories. Existential issues related to the human significance of death for individuals and community will be addressed. Students will be introduced to a basic overview of laws and ethics regarding end-of-life issues, and participate in group discussions using critical thinking skills acquired in class. Guest speakers will include professionals working in funeral preparation, hospice, and grief and bereavement programs.

13233 SS2 9:00A-12:15P MW ELKHART

SOC-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

YOUTH IN TODAY'S SOCIETY

This is a course about youth in the contemporary United States. We will spend time examining the lives of older youth (middle schoolers, teenagers, and young adults) rather than younger children, although the questions we raise throughout the semester can apply to children of all ages. Our approach to studying youth focuses on historical and cultural interpretations of youth cultures in the United States, as well as the social institutions that inform individual and group experiences of youth.

14264 SS2 9:00A-12:15P MW

SUST-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

THE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

In this course, students will be introduced to systems thinking and begin to examine the foundations of sustainability. Sustainability is generally characterized as “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” It requires the integration of natural scientific understanding of the foundations of sustainability and the threat of environmental degradation, with social and behavioral scientific understanding of the social, economic, cultural and political factors driving the human contributions to the problem, as well as to its solution. It also draws upon the historical perspective, ethical sensibility, and creative imagination of the arts and humanities to help understand what led us to this point and to map out alternative futures.

14596 SS1 ONLINE

HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS B 399

BUS-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BUSINESS & SOCIETY: STUDY IN GREECE

This course examines business in terms of its stakeholders throughout society. By the end of this course, you should know the major stakeholders of a business and key concepts of business ethics. You should be able to think critically about issues of business and society, appreciate and be able to synthesize opposing points of view, and work successfully in a team.

14179 SS2 OC


NURS-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

DYING, DEATH, & BEREAVEMENT

In this course, we will discuss the universal experience of mortality and loss. Topics will include attitudes toward death and those who are dying; the process of dying; palliative care and Hospice; emotional & physical care for the dying including both Western & complementary & alternative medicine; suicide, homicide, and sudden or traumatic deaths; funeral rituals; grief and bereavement; the unique experiences of children; the roles of the interdisciplinary team; the use of art, literature, and music at the end-of-life and during the grieving process; and, varying cultural experiences at the end-of-life. .

13537 SS2 WB WEB

PSY-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (P: PSY-P 103, ENG-W 131)

WOMEN AND MADNESS: “CRAZY WOMEN” IN PSYCHOLOGY AND POP CULTURE

This class focuses on the iconic mad woman in historical and fictional works, and examines through a psychological and gendered analysis how this portrayal has been constructed. We will look at how centuries of bias against women in Western societies have resulted in the pathologizing of women’s sexual, mental, emotional, and physical experiences and abilities. We will examine old and new gender stereotypes that have led to disparate treatment by the psychological profession. We will read first-person accounts from women who have undergone mental health treatments such as insane asylums, biological therapies, and talk therapies. We will also turn a critical eye toward the portrayal of dangerous, mad, or crazy women in works of fiction and film to explore important themes of sexuality, motherhood, agency, and relationships.

13510 SS2 1:00-4:15P TR


SOC-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES  

What are the elements of balanced, equitable development? Why are these so hard to achieve? Seeking answers to these questions will form the core of this seminar. We will look at what they mean for the various social problems facing the planet. Finally, we will look at efforts to forge alternative paths to development and quality of life. While we’re not likely to find a quick fix to any of the problems, we will also probe possible interventions to make a positive difference while seeking to build a more equitable, peaceful, and sustainable world. To analyze our changing planet we will draw on the social science disciplines of anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, and economics.  We will also consider the insights and background offered by psychology, history, and ecology.

13267 SS1 9:00A-12:15P TR


SPCH-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

DECEPTION & LYING

Traditionally, communication courses explore the hows and whys of human communication. The field of interpersonal communication tends to focus on theories, skills and abilities that would help students improve their working relationships, from romantic relationships to co-workers. But there's more to communication than just the "good side." What about lies? Deception? Manipulation? These are key areas of study that need to be understood, much the same as we discuss effective and productive communication characteristics. With this said, we will be studying the "dark side" of communication. We will depart from the norm and focus on the art of deception, lying, deception, truth telling and acceptable forms of deception (poker anyone?). Likewise, we will cover hoaxers and con artists: those "professional liars" in our communities. In doing this, my goal is to better prepare students to become critical receivers of messages: both the "good" and the "bad" (however we end up defining these monikers).

13450 SS1 1:00-4:15P TR


WGS-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

WOMEN AND MADNESS: ‘CRAZY WOMEN’ IN PSYCHOLOGY AND POP CULTURE

This class focuses on the iconic mad woman in historical and fictional works, and examines through a psychological and gendered analysis how this portrayal has been constructed. We will look at how centuries of bias against women in Western societies have resulted in the pathologizing of women’s sexual, mental, emotional, and physical experiences and abilities. We will examine old and new gender stereotypes that have led to disparate treatment by the psychological profession. We will read first-person accounts from women who have undergone mental health treatments such as insane asylums, biological therapies, and talk therapies. We will also turn a critical eye toward the portrayal of dangerous, mad, or crazy women in works of fiction and film to explore important themes of sexuality, motherhood, agency, and relationships.

13507 SS2 1:00-4:15P TR
THE NATURAL WORLD N 190

ANTH-N 190 THE NATURAL WORLD

BECOMING HUMAN

An introduction to the evolutionary development of humans, viewed in both a biological and cultural context. Major topics include the concept of evolution, biological relationships between humans and other primates, the fossil record of hominid evolution, and the basic methods employed by archaeologists in the study of human biological and social development.

13432 SS1 1:00-4:15P MW

AST-N 190 THE NATURAL WORLD (P: MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

STARS AND GALAXIES

Our universe is a vast place that contains a variety of objects that almost defy the imagination. This course is a journey that starts from our extended local neighborhood of nearby stars, continues to explore our galaxy and its inhabitants, and ends at the far reaches of known space. Along the way we will discover strange objects such as pulsars, black holes, and exploding galaxies, and we will face some of the remaining deep mysteries about the structure of the universe that occupy today's cosmologists.

13206 SS2 6:30-9:45P TR ELKHART
BIOL-N 190 THE NATURAL WORLD

LIFE SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS

This 3-credit course is one of three science content courses for Elementary Education majors and is designed to

equip pre-service teachers with the biology content knowledge they will need to teach elementary students

grades K-6. In addition to basic content knowledge, the course is intended to acquaint students with the

underlying nature of science, scientific knowledge, and scientific inquiry. Material is approached within the

context of bow it would be taught at the elementary school level, and this connection between biology content

and elementary school teaching forms the core theme for the course. Because this course satisfies the

requirements of an N 190 Natural World Common Core Course, it also covers additional interdisciplinary

applications of biological knowledge and study, as well as ethical issues that arise in biology, the teaching of

biology, and the application of biological knowledge to societal questions and concerns.

14313 SS1 1:00-4:15P MTWR

14314 SS1 9:00-11:00A MR Lab

CHEM-N 190 THE NATURAL WORLD

CHEMISTRY AND OUR ENVIRONMENT

The course focuses on topical, interdisciplinary issues such as the environment, energy, and nutrition.  The science is introduced on a need-to-know basis as issues are discussed and developed.  There are no pre-requisites for this course. Instruction will focus on only those aspects of the fundamentals of chemistry that have a direct bearing on the applications of chemistry to society.

14289 SS1 4:00-7:15P MW

GEOL-N 190 THE NATURAL WORLD (MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

GEOLOGY OF THE NATIONAL PARKS

Our national and state parks contain some of the most beautiful scenery found on the planet, and accordingly draw visitors from around the world. Their spectacular landscapes are the result of a wide range of geologic processes that we will discuss in this course. After introducing the basic framework of plate tectonics we will use individual parks as geologic case studies and introduce geological principles as necessary to scientifically understand what gives the parks their unique character. We will also discuss the political and historical framework in which the park system exists: the establishment and management of national and state parks is a massive undertaking including extensive political, philosophical and economic considerations.

13167 RSTR NS1 1:30-3:45P MTWR
THE NATURAL WORLD N 390

LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS T 190/191

ENG-T 190 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

IMAGINING KING ARTHUR: IN HISTORY, CULTURE, LITERATURE AND FILM FROM 1136 TO 2001

From the very beginning, Arthurian legend has always been a fantasy posing as history. Paradoxically, this fantasy both sparkles with social, political, cultural, and religious ideals, and yet is filled with stories of personal betrayal, civil dissension, brutality, and despair. In this course, we will examine the elements of Arthurian historical fantasy as they evolve over time in engagement with their specific historical contexts. Reading literary accounts of Arthur dating from the 1130s to the 1980s, and viewing films dating from the 1930s to 2004, we will explore how the legend has been adapted to specific cultures and uses, even up to the present.

13464 SS2 1:00-4:15P MW
MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA

This class will take place on the IUSB campus and at the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca, Mexico. An examination of Mexican cinema and literature will complement the course of language study and immersion experience students will also embark on. We will study film form, literary traditions, and cultural expressions as found in Mexican films, novels and short stories, and crafts. We will also pay attention to the use of language in the films and novels, and the role of translation.

14292 PERM SS2 OC


HIST-T 190 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

STUDY ABROAD: DICTATORSHIP & RESISTANCE IN BERLIN & PRAGUE

The short twentieth century (1918‐1989) in Central Europe has been a century of war, dictatorship, devastation, and revolution. This course will allow you to develop a new understanding of this period through personal encounters with two cities: Berlin & Prague. You will study the history, read the literature, analyze the culture, and experience living in two of the most important cities in Central Europe. You will see the bullet holes that still exist on Berlin buildings, walk in the streets with the former Berlin wall marked on the ground, visit Prague’s city center, where activists marched in 1968 and 1989, experience Prague’s Wenceslas Square where Prague’s citizens resisted Nazi and Communist tanks, and learn about the Holocaust by studying at Berlin’s Holocaust museum, touring the cemetery and synagogues in Prague’s Jewish Ghetto, and taking a day‐trip from Prague to the concentration camp Theresienstadt. You will view images of dictatorship and resistance in film, photography, and avant‐garde art, and these examples will guide you in the creation of a book of collage that artistically communicates the varieties of your experience abroad.

13418 SS1 9:00-12:15P MW

*This class meets three weeks on campus then in Berlin and Prague for the rest of the summer session.*
MUS-T 190 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL (also titled Exploring Musical Genres: Rock N Roll, and Rock and Roll Music)

This course explores history of rock and roll, from its roots in American jazz and blues in the early twentieth century, to its most contemporary manifestations. The method for studying rock and roll in this course is to examine it as a logical result of American societal trends and cultural mores of the era.  As such, Music T-190; The History of Rock and Roll is as much a look at American society and its values as it is a music course.  The ability to read music is not required.  A term paper and two examinations (mid-term and final) are the course evaluators. Students need not have any formal training in music to benefit from this course.

13484 SS1 ONLINE

13450 SS2 ONLINE


EXPLORING MUSICAL GENRES: MUSIC IN THE BIG APPLE

This course, open to non-music and music majors, will use the city of New York as a focal point to trace the development of three styles of music: classical, jazz, and rock/pop. From an interdisciplinary perspective, the course will begin with an overview of the social history of the city and how this lay the groundwork for an international cultural capital. Composers and reformers will be the central topic, but the course will also touch on NYC architecture, history, and politics.

13353 SS1 ONLINE


EXPLORING MUSICAL GENRES: CLASSICAL MUSIC & BEYOND

This course explores the elements and performing media of music using live music, recorded music, and video. The role of music in society at different times in history in both Western and non-Western culture will be examined. Students will be expected to attend classical music concerts, and to develop the listening skills needed to write critically about their concert experience and other music experienced in the course.

13404 SS1 ONLINE
LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS T 390

ENG-T 390 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA

This class will take place on the IUSB campus and at the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca, Mexico. An examination of Mexican cinema and literature will complement the course of language study and immersion experience students will also embark on. We will study film form, literary traditions, and cultural expressions as found in Mexican films, novels and short stories, and crafts. We will also pay attention to the use of language in the films and novels, and the role of translation.

14293 PERM SS2 OC



Last Update 5/19/2016





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