Framework curricula for secondary schools


Part I. ISSUE OF APPLICATION PERMIT



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Part I.
ISSUE OF APPLICATION PERMIT
1.


  1. The Examination Centre decides to issue Application Permits considering the proposal of the Curriculum Committee. The Curriculum Committee issues such proposals within ninety days of the receipt of applications.

  2. The National Public Education Council is tasked with

  1. developing the terms of reference for expert opinions and approval;

  2. specifying the general rules regarding the size and composition of the Curriculum Committee.

  1. The members of the Curriculum Committee are invited to participate in the work of the committee by the Minister of Education.

  2. Permit Applications must include the following:

  1. description of educational system, in particular

  • the submitted curriculum programme or the course syllabus;

  • list of qualifications and physical conditions needed for implementation;

  • method of quality assurance used for education based on the curriculum;

  1. the objective, tasks, syllabus, content and requirements of the curriculum programme or course;

  2. the description of the main methods and tools of student performance control and assessment;

  3. a list of required coursebooks and other books.

  1. The following must be attached to the Permit Application:

  1. the position of the concerned national level minority self-government, if the curriculum or course contributes to the education of national / ethnic minorities;

  2. the position of the ministry managed by the minister responsible for the qualification concerned, in case of vocational preparation, vocational introduction or career guidance subjects;

  3. certificate of the payment of fee;

2.
The Curriculum Committee obtains at least two expert opinions before issuing a proposal. In case of minority provision the National Minority Committee must be consulted, and the consent of the concerned national level self-government must also be obtained. A further condition is that one of the experts must be a person with experience in minority provision. The costs of employing experts must be covered from the fee charged for the procedure.


3.


  1. The Curriculum Committee forwards the application for approval by the Curriculum Committee and the issue of the Application Permit together with its proposal in favour or against the application to the Examination Centre.

  2. The Curriculum Committee may decide to approve the curriculum or course and issue the Application Permit on certain stipulations. The call for the fulfilment of such requirements must in all cases be justified, and a reasonable deadline must be specified. The deadline may be extended upon request. This deadline is an extension to the deadline specified in Section 1 (a). If the proposed amendments are undertaken, the Curriculum Committee shall review the amended curriculum when the amendments have been made, without having to file a new application. If an applicant fails to submit a new application in line with the stipulations of the Curriculum Committee by the extended deadline, the Curriculum Committee shall propose the rejection of the application by the Examination Centre.

  3. In case of receiving a proposal in support of the application, the head of the Examination centre reviews the submitted documents to confirm if the proposal of the Curriculum Committee was prepared and made in line with the provisions of the applicable degree in terms of form and content, issues a decision concerning the Application Permit, and makes sure the curriculum is added to the curriculum register. In case of any fault or deficiency, the documentation of the submitted proposal must be returned to the Curriculum Committee for correction or amendment.

  4. If the Curriculum Committee rejects the application in its proposal, the Examination Centre shall inform the applicant thereof within thirty days of the receipt of the proposal. The applicant may have a look at the expert opinions and the proposal of the Curriculum Committee, and a copy thereof must be delivered to applicant upon request. The Applicant may comment on the proposal of the Curriculum Committee and the expert opinions within fifteen days, and such comments must be sent to the Examination Centre. On the basis of this, the head of the Examination Centre may decide to issue or reject the application. The Centre may require the Curriculum Committee to repeat the review of the application by using different experts in the process.

  5. The approval of a curriculum or course which otherwise complies with the provisions of this Decree may not be rejected on grounds that it contains knowledge implying ideological commitment, however it must be stipulated in the permit that application in provision sponsored by the state or a local government is not allowed.

4.
The decision on the issue of the Application permit must include which types of schools may apply the curriculum or course, as well as the operational conditions which must be ensured before application. The document must also specify the possible date of introduction, and, if applicable, the subjects which can be taken into account for the purpose of examination of basic education or secondary school leaving examination on the basis of the curriculum.


Part II.
ISSUE OF INTRODUCTION PERMIT


  1. For the application of a curriculum with an Application Permit, the institution wishing to apply the curriculum must submit an application for an Introduction Permit to the Examination Centre. Applications for Introduction permit must include the following:

  1. the name and head office of the institution and the name of the head of the institution which wishes to apply the curriculum or course;

  2. the serial number of the Application Permit pertaining to the curriculum or course the institution wish to apply, and the educational programme of the school;

  3. a list of the educational background, qualification and degree held by the staff who are to teach the course;

  4. a list of the available physical conditions (rooms, training facilities, equipment, services, etc.)




  1. The following must be attached to the application:

  1. a statement by the sponsor on the approval of the curriculum and commitment to cover possible extra costs;

  2. a statement issued by the notary of the county (capital) on the fact that the application of the curriculum will not jeopardise the performance of tasks related to compulsory schooling in the area concerned;

  3. the consent of the ministry responsible for vocational training, if the applicant is a vocational secondary schools and trade schools;

  4. in case of minority provision in mother tongue or bilingual provision with a regional or national catchment area, a statement issued by the national level minority self-government concerned;

  5. the consent of the local minority self-government, if the applicant is a school participating in national / ethnic minority provision

  6. certificate of the payment of fee charged for the procedure;

  7. the charter of the school;

  8. the consent of the author of the curriculum / course to the introduction of the curriculum in the institution concerned.




  1. The Examination centre checks whether the application complies with the applicable rules, and examines whether the applicant institution is able to ensure the conditions required for the introduction of the curriculum to be applied. Decisions are issued on the basis of this.

Part III.


WITHDRAWAL OF PERMITS


  1. The Examination Centre may withdraw an Application Permit, if a routine procedure or a procedure initiated upon request proves that the permit should have been refused.

  2. The Examination Centre may withdraw an Introduction permit, if the Application Permit has been withdrawn or the conditions of the training programme in question are not given.

  3. The withdrawal of permits is governed by the rules applicable to the procedure of issue.

Part IV.
RULES OF INCOMPATIBILITY IN AUTHORISATION PROCEDURES


No person with an interest in the issue of a permit may be involved in any procedure related to the issue of an Application Permit or an Introduction permit. This applies to the following persons in particular:

  1. the developer of the curriculum, course or a relative of the developer [Civil Code, Section 685.b];

  2. the representative of the school;

  3. public employees who are a party to an effective employment contract signed by the developer of the curriculum / course or the school.

Appendix 3 for Ministry of Education Decree ........./2000. ( )



THE FEE CHARGED FOR THE PROCEDURE
1.
The fee charged for the procedure for the issue of an Application Permit is

  1. twenty-five thousand Hungarian Forints per course;

  2. one hundred and fifty thousand Hungarian Forints if the subject of the submitted application is an entire curriculum.


2.
The fee charged for the procedure for the issue of an Introduction Permit is

  1. a) five thousand Hungarian Forints per course;

  2. twenty thousand Hungarian Forints in case of an entire curriculum.


3.
The fee payable for a legal remedy procedure is the fifty per cent of the amount calculated pursuant to Sections 1 and 2. If the remedy procedure is successful, the fee paid pursuant to this section must be refunded.

FRAMEWORK CURRICULA FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION I. (GRAMMAR SCHOOLS)

- ADDENDUM -

FIRST AND SECOND FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Years 11 and 12 of Education

FIRST FOREIGN LANGUAGE: Years 9 through 12 of Education

Year 11
Number of lessons per year: 111
Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 12)


Concepts

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 12)



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx.200 word text in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of an unknown language component of an approx.200 word text in standard language on the basis of the context.

  • Understand important information included in an approx.200 word text in standard language;

  • Identify specific information in an approx.200 word text in standard language;

  • Understand the essence of everyday conversations or a monologue effortlessly.


Speaking skills

Students can



  • Give structured answers with somewhat complex structures to questions formulated in a subtler way;

  • Make statements, ask questions, relate events and express emotions in somewhat eloquent sentences;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding or expression;

  • Participate in a conversation,

  • Enquire about the partner’s opinion and defend own opinion in a conversation.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Read a text with approximately 250 words written in standard language;

  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx.250 word text written in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in an approx.250 word text relying on familiar components;

  • Find important information in an approx. 250 word text;

  • Identify specific information in an approx. 250 word text written in standard language;

  • Summarise an approx. 250 word text written in standard language in the mother tongue and / or the target language;

  • Understand simple or simplified journalistic or literary texts without difficulty.


Writing skills

Students can



  • Write an approx. 200 word text organised into a few paragraphs to communicate facts;

  • Express thoughts and emotions in a text organised into paragraphs on the basis of logical relations, using a variety of expressions, sentence structures and the appropriate linguistic devices;

  • Create various text types (message, greeting, informal letter);

  • Apply diverse forms of communication.

Year 12
Number of lessons per year: 96


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.

Communicative intentions
Communicative intentions used in social interaction:

  • addressing people;

  • greetings and saying goodbye;

  • introducing self and others;

  • introduction and saying goodbye during a telephone conversation;

  • sending greetings orally;

  • forms of address and goodbyes used in formal and informal letters;

  • ending formal and informal letters;

  • enquiry about how others are, and responses to similar enquiries;

  • asking for and giving permission;

  • expressing thanks and responding to expression of thanks;

  • apologising and responding to apologies;

  • congratulations, greetings and responding to congratulations and greetings;

  • expressing sympathy and responding to expression of sympathy.


Expressing emotions:

  • gratitude;

  • regret;

  • joy;

  • satisfaction, discontent;

  • surprise;

  • hope,

  • fear,

  • sorrow;

  • anger.


Expressing personal attitude and opinion:

  • expressing and asking opinions and responding to that;

  • admitting or not admitting that somebody is right;

  • agreeing, disagreeing,

  • expressing interest and lack of interest;

  • approval and disapproval;

  • praise, criticism, reproach;

  • objection;

  • rejecting objection;

  • will, desire, uncertainty, ability, necessity, obligation and possibility;

  • promise;

  • intention, plan;

  • enquiry about judgement, desire or preference.


Communicative intentions related to the exchange of information:

  • naming and describing objects and persons;

  • describing events;

  • asking for and giving information;

  • affirmative and negative answers;

  • refusing to answer;

  • knowledge and lack of knowledge;

  • certainty, uncertainty;

  • knowing, not knowing;

  • memories, inability to remember.


Influencing the partner’s actions:

  • request;

  • prohibition, warning;

  • asking for help and responding to requests for help,

  • suggestion and responding to suggestions;

  • offering food and accepting or rejecting;

  • invitation and accepting/declining invitations;

  • complaints;

  • asking for advice and giving advice;

  • offering help and responding to offered help;

  • offers and accepting r declining offers.


Typical communicative intentions in interactions:

  • backtracking, asking for repetition;

  • lack of understanding;

  • request for spelling, spelling;

  • request for slower or louder speech;

  • indicating intention to speak, introducing topic, interruption;

  • confirmation;

  • circumscription;

  • giving examples;

  • changing subject, concluding a conversation.


Concepts:

  • Talking about actions, events or existence.

  • Expressing possession.

  • Spatial and chronological relations.

  • Reported speech.

  • Quantitative and qualitative relations.

  • Modality.

  • Case structure.

  • Logical relations.

  • Cohesive devices.


Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx.200 word text;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of an unknown language component on the basis of context in an approx. 200 word text;

  • Understand important information included in an approx. 200 word text;

  • Identify specific information in an approx. 200 word text;

  • Summarise everyday conversations or monologues in the first language and/or the target language.


Speaking skills

Students can



  • Give structured answers with somewhat complex structures to questions formulated in a subtler way;

  • Make statements, ask questions, relate events and express emotions in well-structured sentences;

  • Express thoughts in the appropriate logical order using well-structured sentences;

  • Backtrack in case of problems with understanding or expression;

  • Participate in a discussion,

  • Participate in informal conversations.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Read an approx. 250 word text;

  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx. 250 word text written in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in an approx. 250 word text relying on familiar components;

  • Scan an approx. 250 word text for important information;

  • Identify specific information in an approx. 250 word text written in standard language;

  • Summarise an approx. 250 word text written in standard language in the first language.

  • Summarise a simple or simplified journalistic or literary texts in the first language and/or the target language.


Writing skills

Students can



  • Write a few paragraphs (approx. 200 words) to communicate facts;

  • Express thoughts, emotions and views supported with arguments in a structured text on the basis of logical relations, using a variety of expressions, sentence structures and the appropriate linguistic devices;

  • Create various text types;

  • Apply diverse forms of communication.

SECOND FOREIGN LANGUAGE: Years 9 through 12 of Education


Year 11
Number of lessons per year: 111
Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into seven different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 12)


Concepts

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 12)



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Understand salient information in an approx.100 word text delivered in standard language;

  • Identify specific information in an approx.100 word text delivered in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of an unknown language component of an approx.100 word text delivered in standard language on the basis of the context;

  • Understand the essence of an approx. 150 word text delivered in standard language;

  • Distinguish important and unimportant information in an approx.150 word text delivered in standard language;

  • Understand the gist of a conversation or monologue with familiar linguistic devices.


Speaking skills

Students can



  • Give answers with somewhat complex structures to questions formulated in a subtler way;

  • Make statements, ask questions, relate events and express emotions in simple sentences;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding or expression;

  • Participate in a conversation,

  • Join in a conversation, and express position or view.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Students can



  • Scan an approx. 100 word text delivered in standard language for important information;

  • Identify specific information in an approx. 100 word text written in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in an approx. 100 word text relying on familiar components;

  • Understand the gist of an approx. 150 text delivered in standard language, and read the text out;

  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx. 150 word text written in standard language;

  • Tell a simple story.


Writing skills

Students can



  • Convert thoughts into a text of approx. 100 words on the basis of logical relations using simple expressions and sentence structures;

  • Create various text types (message, greeting, informal letter);

  • Apply diverse forms of communication (narration, description).

Year 12
Number of lessons per year: 111


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions
Communicative intentions used in social interaction:

  • addressing people;

  • greetings and saying goodbye;

  • introducing self and others;

  • introduction and

  • saying goodbye during a telephone conversation;

  • forms of address and goodbyes used in formal and informal letters;

  • enquiry about how others are, and responses to similar enquiries;

  • asking for and giving permission;

  • expressing thanks and responding to expression of thanks;

  • apologies and responding to apologies;

  • congratulations, wishing well and appropriate responses.


Expressing emotions:

  • gratitude

  • joy;

  • satisfaction, discontent;

  • surprise;

  • hope,

  • sorrow;

  • anger.


Expressing personal attitude and opinion:

  • expressing and asking opinions and responding to that;

  • admitting or not admitting that somebody is right;

  • agreeing, disagreeing,

  • expressing interest and lack of interest;

  • approval and disapproval;

  • praise, criticism;

  • objection;

  • will, desire, , ability, obligation, necessity and possibility;

  • promise, intention, plan;

  • enquiry about judgement, desire or preference.


Communicative intentions related to the exchange of information:

  • naming and describing objects and persons;

  • describing events;

  • asking for and giving information;

  • affirmative and negative answers;

  • knowledge and lack of knowledge

  • certainty, uncertainty;

  • knowing and not knowing.


Influencing the partner’s actions:

  • request;

  • prohibition, warning;

  • asking for help and responding to requests for help,

  • suggestion and responding to suggestions;

  • offering food and accepting or rejecting;

  • invitation and accepting/declining invitations;


Typical communicative intentions in interactions:

  • backtracking, asking for repetition;

  • lack of understanding;

  • request for spelling, spelling;

  • request for slower or louder speech;

  • indicating intention to speak, introducing topic, interruption;

  • confirmation;

  • changing subject, concluding a conversation.




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