Foundations for success guideline for extending and enriching learning for aboriginal and torres strait islander children in the kindergarten year



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APPENDICES
Appendix 1
Relationship between the principles of the Early Years Learning Framework and the guiding principles of Foundations for Success
EYLF principle – Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships

Foundations for Success Guiding principle 1 – ‘Knowing who you are’ and having a positive sense of cultural identity is central to children’s social, emotional, intellectual, physical and spiritual wellbeing.

Guiding principle 2 – Children learn best through responsive and reciprocal relationships that connect with their world.
EYLF principle – Partnerships

Guiding principle 3 – Strong family and community engagement enables children’s health, learning and wellbeing.

Guiding principle 4 – First languages define every child — their knowledge, identity and relationships.
EYLF principle – High expectations and equity

Guiding principle 5 – Children are competent and capable and have been learning since birth.

Guiding principle 6 – Children’s positive attitudes to learning are essential for success.
EYLF principle – Respect for diversity

Guiding principle 7: Children are entitled to a voice of their own and to having their rights valued.


EYLF principle – Ongoing learning and reflective practice

Guiding principle 8: Ongoing learning and reflective practice underpin a quality kindergarten program.



Appendix 2

Relationship between the sub-elements of the Early Years Learning Framework outcomes and the sub-elements of the Foundations for Success learning statements


EYLF outcome – Children have a strong sense of identity
EYLF sub-element

Children feel safe, secure and supported.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become strong in their emotional wellbeing. They feel safe, secure and supported.


EYLF sub-element

Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become increasingly independent and interdependent. They interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect.


EYLF sub-element

Children develop their emerging autonomy, interdependence, resilience and sense of agency.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children build a sense of belief and confidence in themselves. They delight in making decisions and choices, and demonstrate courage and resilience to persevere and manage change and challenge.


EYLF sub-element

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children build knowledgeable and confident identities. They develop pride and strength in personal and cultural identity, and share a sense of belonging and connectedness.


EYLF outcome – Children are connected with and contribute to their world
EYLF sub-element

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children broaden their sense of belonging to groups and communities. They become aware of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation. They explore their own and others’ cultures and the similarities and differences among people.


EYLF sub-element

Children respond to diversity with respect.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children broaden their sense of belonging to groups and communities. They become aware of bias and stereotyping and respond to diversity with respect.


EYLF sub-element

Children become aware of fairness.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children broaden their sense of belonging to groups and communities. They become aware of fairness.


EYLF sub-element

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children are increasingly independent and interdependent. They become socially responsible and show respect for environments, and explore interactions between people and environments.


EYLF outcome – Children have a strong sense of wellbeing
EYLF sub-element

Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become strong in their emotional wellbeing. They feel safe, secure and supported, and take increasing responsibility for their own health and safety.


EYLF sub-element

Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become strong in their physical wellbeing. They gain control and strength for manipulating objects, tools and equipment with increasing complexity. They develop confidence, coordination and strength in large movement skills and challenges.


EYLF outcome – Children are confident and involved learners
EYLF sub-element

Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become confident and involved knowers and learners. They build dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity.


EYLF sub-element

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem-solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children become confident and involved knowers and learners. They apply a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating.


EYLF sub-element

Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children explore, investigate and connect with people, land, place, time and technology. They transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another and from one time to another.


EYLF sub-element

Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies, and natural and processed materials.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children explore, investigate and connect with people, land, place, time and technology. They resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials.


EYLF outcome – Children are effective communicators
EYLF sub-element

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children explore and expand their first languages. They interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.


EYLF sub-element

Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children engage with multiple forms of literacy that build bridges between family and community contexts and new learning. They engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts. They explore symbols and patterns in language, and build confidence and interest in exploring reading and writing behaviours.


EYLF sub-element

Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children engage with multiple forms of literacy that build bridges between family and community contexts and new learning. They express ideas and make meaning using a range of media.


EYLF sub-element

Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children engage with numeracy concepts that build bridges between family and community contexts and new learning. They begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work, build confidence and interest in counting, and explore mathematical thinking, concepts and language.


EYLF sub-element

Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking.


Foundations for Success learning statement sub-element

Children explore, investigate and connect with people, land, place, time and technology. They use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking.



Appendix 3
Strategies for extending and enriching children’s learning — the following definitions have been adapted for use in the Queensland Kindergarten Learning Guideline from Interpreting the Early Years Learning Framework: A guide for educators: Draft for trial (Commonwealth of Australia 2009b, pp. 35–36).
Challenging — offering children opportunities to extend their skills and ideas within the context of secure relationships. Educators gauge when to offer challenges and experiences that will expand children’s thinking through provocation and reflection.
Collaborating — enabling children to take the lead in an investigation or an idea while working alongside them to contribute to, rather than dominate, the direction of the experience. This can also include involving others, such as family members and members of the community, who may have particular expertise or knowledge that can inform the learning.
Encouraging — supporting, particularly when children are making an effort, through making comments that motivate and encourage them to persist.
Explaining — making ideas and requests clear for children. This is useful at times when children want or need to understand a concept or idea, often about their own and others’ safety or rights.
Identifying — drawing children’s attention to new ideas and topics. Pointing out things of interest may generate areas for exploration and investigation.
Imagining — creating an environment where children are encouraged to use imagination and creativity to investigate, hypothesise and express themselves. Educators plan for children to have opportunities where there is freedom to engage in experiences with no set expectations for outcomes, and where children can explore their own possibilities.
Instructing — using techniques that engage children and are respectful of children’s ideas. Teachers use direct instruction when other strategies might not be appropriate. For example, teaching children about road safety on an outing requires teachers to be clear about their expectations for children, and to identify the safe practices needed in these types of situations.
Listening — encouraging children to lead conversations through listening deeply and thoughtfully to what they are saying. Through actively responding to children’s contributions, teachers create opportunities for authentic and sustained conversational exchanges.
Making connections — assisting children to see relationships and incongruities. Teachers contribute to children’s thinking by comparing and contrasting experiences and ideas.
Modelling — demonstrating a skill or how a task is done. Modelling should always be supported with opportunities for children to have a go at practising the skill themselves.
Negotiating — enabling children to have a go at solving problems and addressing complex issues. Teachers provide ‘scaffolding’ to allow children to see multiple sides to an argument or issue, and encourage children to find reasonable solutions that can address their own and others’ perspectives. See Scaffolding.
Providing for choice — offering opportunities for children to make choices involves recognising children’s capacities to make safe choices and experience the consequences of their actions. Provisions for choice need to be well considered in the context of the relationships, and should not place children at risk or in danger. Supporting children to make choices is valuable when autonomy and independence are encouraged.

Appendix 4
Sample 1 Transition to school statement
Transition to school statement (insert photo)
My name is:
My date of birth is:
My kindergarten is:
When I come to school I would like you to know (his may include views about starting school, what the child would like the teacher to know about them, what the child is looking forward to at school, what concerns them):

My family would like you to know (this may include special interests, allergies, other children or friends at the school, language spoken at home, important family events, views about your child starting school, or other information that your family thinks will help your child make the transition to school):


My educators would like you to know (this may include the child’s strengths and dispositions towards learning and other information that will support continued learning. Comments from other professionals specific to supporting the child’s transition may also be included):


My learning journey at kindergarten


Being proud and strong — children have a strong sense of identity (for example, the ways I show pride in who I am and where I come from, my resilience and confidence, and my ability to make choices and decisions and cope with change)
Being an active participant — children connect with and contribute to their world (for example, the ways I show awareness of belonging to groups and communities, how I interact in relation to others, respond to diversity with respect, show awareness of fairness and respect for environments)
Being healthy and safe — children have a strong sense of wellbeing (for example, the ways I show that I feel safe, secure and supported, my ability to take responsibility for my own health and physical wellbeing and my active engagement in physical activity)
Being a learner — children are confident and involved learners (for example, the ways I show confidence in myself as a knower and learner through dispositions such as curiosity, creativity and imagination, problem-solving, experimentation and investigation of environments, and engagement with digital technologies)
Being a communicator — children are effective communicators (for example, the ways I interact verbally and non-verbally with others in FL/s or SAE, my engagement with texts and interest in exploring reading and writing behaviours, and my interest in symbols and pattern systems, counting and mathematical thinking and concepts)

Sample 2 Transition to school statement
My family and I have given permission to share this statement with the child’s school.
My name is:
I am a (girl/boy)
I am years old. My birthday is on:
This is a picture of all the people in my family (insert photo).
At kindergarten I enjoy:

Sometimes I need help with:

My family would like to you know:

Information from the educators in kindergarten


My educator’s names and contact details were:
I attended:
My educators would like you to know:

Some suggestions that may support my transition into Prep


Learning journey


Being proud and strong

Children have a strong sense of identity (identity and belonging, and confidence and resilience)

Comment:
Being an active participant

Children connect with and contribute to their world (listening and negotiation, positive relationships)

Comment:
Being healthy and safe

Children have a strong sense of wellbeing (safety and security, and physical activity)

Comment:
Being a learner

Children are confident and involved learners (involvement in learning, and investigating environments)

Comment:
Being a communicator

Children are effective communicators

• Oral language/s

• Literacy

• Numeracy

Comment:


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