Foundations for success guideline for extending and enriching learning for aboriginal and torres strait islander children in the kindergarten year


Being proud and strong (EYLF Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity)



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4.1 Being proud and strong (EYLF Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity)
4.1.1 Identity and belonging
A kindergarten child builds a knowledgeable and confident identity. They develop pride and strength in personal and cultural identity, and share a sense of belonging and connectedness.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — pride and confidence in knowing ‘who they are’ and ‘where they come from’; understanding of themselves as significant and respected; a sense of belonging to their family, community and the kindergarten program community; a feeling of acceptance for ‘who they are’ and ‘where they come from’; pride and connection to the language/s, culture and traditions of their family and community; awareness of the traditional and contemporary aspects of their personal and cultural identity; and knowledge of their place within family, community and kinship systems as shared by Elders and community members.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
What does being proud and strong mean in this context?

How do children become competent in their own culture if they are immersed in someone else’s?

How are families viewed in a kindergarten program?

Do I engage in family and community partnerships to facilitate the exchange of ideas?

Do my interactions with children and their families reflect culturally specific knowledge?

Have I consulted with Elders in supporting children to develop strong cultural identities?

Does the environment reflect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identities, beliefs and values?

Are children and families happy to come to this environment?

Am I critically reflecting on my own cultural competence, and am I consulting with the community when assessing the cultural appropriateness of the program?

B. Pedagogy


Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they promote in all children a strong sense of who they are and their connectedness to others, and show genuine respect for all children and their ways of belonging, being and becoming. They also promote this learning when they listen to and learn about children’s understanding of themselves, provide many opportunities for children to interact with the culturally valued skills, languages, stories, music, dance, ritual, food and crafts of their families and community, and furnish the learning environment with resources and artifacts that show and celebrate the culture, values and beliefs of the children’s family and community, e.g. family trees, photographs of community events, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags.
They should involve family and community in gatherings and yarning sessions, morning teas, BBQs, shared lunches and celebrations, and invite Elders to share aspects of children’s traditional heritage and cultural roots, e.g. through storytelling or traditional music and dance.

They further promote this learning when they model language to describe and celebrate the culture of the community in FLs and SAE; provide many opportunities for children to explore different aspects of their identities through their everyday play, conversations and relationships, e.g. knowledge about the sea, bush, hunting, fishing, swimming, horse riding, camping or sport; and organise opportunities for children to participate in community events, e.g. Blessing Ceremonies, NAIDOC Week, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (NAICD), Mabo Day, Corroboree and Nulpa.

C. Documenting and reflecting
Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children show pride in knowing that they are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, and confidently talk about or show they know who they are and who they are related to, and distinguish between family and non-family members. They readily respond to a ‘nickname’ that has special meaning within the community, show understanding of their special place within family and community. They respond to rules about interacting with family and community, Elders, Uncles and Aunties, and show pride as they actively participate in community events and cultural ceremonies. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence is seen when children prefer the assistance or closeness of Indigenous educators, prefer to observe and listen to others share information about family and community, and approach experiences, people and situations with encouragement from familiar adults. They share information about themselves or their family with the support of FL-speaking adults, talk about things of personal interest with some prompting, and experiment with languages, creole and SAE in play with familiar peers, and like-language speaking adults. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children enthusiastically share information about family and community, ask questions about others’ family and friends, and talk about or draw and label siblings, Uncles and Aunties and extended family members, pets and community heroes. They share aspects of their cultural heritage, and name family and community members during play. They share or model their skills in making or contributing to traditional crafts and artifacts, e.g. weaving, spear making, traditional cookery, express ideas about their connection to country/homelands e.g. Dis my ‘ome ere-where Yarrabah, Dis bla my island dis one ‘ere, Nanna and Poppi live oba dere la. (Add points relevant to your context.)

4.1.2 Confidence and resilience
A kindergarten child builds a sense of belief and confidence in themselves. They delight in making decisions and choices, and develop courage and resilience to persevere and manage change and challenge.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — pride and confidence in their competence and capability; confidence in making choices and decisions; confidence to share experiences, feelings and ideas; confidence in approaching tasks, people and situations; courage and resilience to cope with challenge and manage change; confidence to try new and challenging tasks; motivation and readiness to persevere when faced with the new and unfamiliar; and enjoyment in sharing successes and achievements.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
In what ways do I demonstrate high expectations of the learning capabilities of all children within the program?

Do my interactions build each child’s self-belief and validate who they are, what they know, what they can do and what they can be?

In what ways do the children experience success on a daily basis?

How can I involve families and community in supporting children to be confident and resilient?

Do I listen to the ideas of children, families and communities and build on the knowledge that they bring?

B. Pedagogy


Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they engage actively with children in their play, allowing the time and space to complete tasks, and supporting and extending their attempts to make choices. They should acknowledge children’s achievements and make suggestions that build on their ideas, ensure all children experience daily and frequent opportunities for success, and encourage children to persevere at challenging tasks, e.g. ‘Let’s try it this way’, ‘’We can do it together’, ‘Would you like me to help?’, ‘Let’s see if we can find someone to help’. They further promote this learning when they model strategies for success, e.g. how to plan tasks to completion or how to seek assistance from others and make connections with prior, present and future learning, e.g. ‘Can you remember when …?’, ‘We could finish this tomorrow’, ‘I wonder if we could do this in another way?’. They should share the decision-making process with children, e.g. ‘Can you think of another way?’ ‘That’s a great idea’ ‘How would you like me to help?’, and value each child’s attempts at personal decision-making, e.g. ‘Wow, look how hard you tried’. Confidence and resilience are also promoted when educators celebrate and share children’s successes with peers and families, e.g. respectful display of children’s artwork and constructions, respond sensitively to children’s emotional states, e.g. ‘It’s OK we can try again later’, ‘Let’s go slowly’, ‘Would you like me to hold your hand while you try?’, and design an environment that enables children to make choices and decisions about their play and resources.

C. Documenting and reflecting


Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children show self-reliance and the ability to make decisions for themselves. They regulate certain aspects of their own lives — including when to eat, what to wear, and about when and where to sleep. They show that they are naturally observant and practically competent, adapt readily to new circumstances, and seek help from peers as much as from adults. They show caution in tackling new tasks, and confidently explore their environment, take considered risks and accept challenges. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence is seen when children seek close proximity to parent and familiar educators. They spend a long time on activities that relate to prior knowledge, prefer to watch before gradually having a go in own time, and prefer to remain in familiar play areas, to be by themselves or play with familiar equipment and resources. They locate, select and manage resources for play with assistance, appear cautious when the room is rearranged or unfamiliar adults are in the room, and seek reassurance and support from a familiar adult when entering or leaving the kindergarten environment. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children confidently explore the environment and engage with others across a range of learning contexts. They approach tasks with curiosity, confidence and motivation, and carry out tasks, or help others to do so, by planning, gathering resources and persevering. They repeat, revisit and add to projects or experiences they have initiated, persist when faced with a challenge, and manage change and cope with frustrations and the unexpected. They attempt to complete new or challenging experiences before seeking help, and share with others how they completed tasks and respond positively to encouragement from others. (Add points relevant to your context.)

4.2 Being an active participant (EYLF Outcome 2: Children connect with and contribute to their world)
4.2.1 Listening and negotiation
A kindergarten child broadens their sense of belonging to groups and communities. They become aware of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation. They explore their own and others’ cultures and the similarities and differences among people. They become aware of bias and stereotyping and respond to diversity with respect, and become aware of fairness.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — ways to respond positively and show respect for the connections, similarities and differences among people; awareness of their own and other cultures, including their right to belong to many communities; an understanding of the diversity of cultures, heritages, family structures, capabilities, backgrounds and traditions of the world they live in; respect and value for the ideas, feelings, needs and opinions of others; active engagement with a range of people, groups and communities; an ability to recognise fairness and the capacity to show concern for others; and awareness of bias and stereotypes and the ways in which people are included or excluded.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
Have I considered which rules and expectations of the program the children may find unfamiliar?

Have I allowed enough time for the children to familiarise themselves with the program?

In what ways do I allow children to be participants within the program?

Have I involved the children and their families in planning the look and feel of the environment?

How do I build on the contributions of children and families to the learning environment?

What do I know about the responsibilities, roles and obligations that children may have in the home?

Have I considered the relationships of power that are reflected within the program?

How do these complement an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander world view of childhood?

In what ways do I listen to and act on children’s ideas?

B. Pedagogy


Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they use conversation, role play, puppets, music, dance and stories to explore feelings and different perspectives and ideas with children. They should encourage children to listen to others and to respect diverse perspectives, e.g. when engaging children in planning and decision-making about group experiences and their learning environment, and plan for enjoyable small group experiences and supporting children when they work together, e.g ‘Let’s pack this up together’. Listening and negotiation are also promoted when educators model language to support children’s attempts at listening and negotiating, e.g. ‘It’s time to listen now’, provide many opportunities for children to assume different social roles in group activities, e.g. as initiators, facilitators, negotiators, organisers, observers and listeners, and investigate different communities and cultural groups using books, stories, music, special events and technology as stimulation. They should expose children to resources that broaden their appreciation of diversity, e.g. artefacts, dance, music, languages and dialects, stories, art and craft of other cultures. They should also initiate discussions with children about being fair and equitable, model ways to challenge representations of people in stereotypical ways, and draw children’s attention to diverse ways of doing and being, including family structures, roles in communities, religions, practices, capabilities and talents.

C. Documenting and reflecting


Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children spend significant amounts of time with a range of people other than the immediate family, and show they have a strong sense of community and understanding of extended family. They willingly share food, toys and other possessions and demonstrate a strong understanding of togetherness and a sense of fairness. They implement some gender-specific roles and show awareness that there are cultural differences in activities according to sex, and provide assistance to peers and affection and nurturing to those younger than themselves. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence Is seen when children prefer to take on the role of observer and listener. They watch and listen as others share examples of different communities and cultural groups, e.g. music, dance, stories, languages, and as educators use conversation, puppets, music, dance and stories to explore feelings and different perspectives. They seek encouragement to engage with the artefacts, arts and crafts, languages, stories, dance, food of their own and other cultures, and prefer to listen in group discussions about ‘being fair’. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children cooperate and negotiate with others during play and group experiences. They notice and respond positively to similarities and differences among people, e.g. family structures, gender, talents and abilities, and demonstrate a broadening understanding of the diversity of culture, heritage, background and tradition. They listen to others’ ideas and respect different viewpoints, and demonstrate an awareness of inclusiveness by supporting others to participate in play and group experiences. They express their own ideas and opinions about ‘being fair’, and notice and respond to unfairness and bias in positive ways, e.g. ‘We can all play here’. (Add points relevant to your context.)

4.2.2 Positive relationships
A kindergarten child becomes increasingly independent and interdependent. They interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect, are socially responsible and show respect for environments, and explore interactions between people and environments.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — abilities for connecting and interacting with peers and people, things, belongings and the environment; enjoyment and ability to have fun with others; ability to cooperate with others, respond to their feelings and negotiate roles and relationships (including sharing and turn-taking); ability to reflect on their actions and consider consequences for themselves, others and the environment; skills for resolving conflict and contributing to problem-solving in peaceful ways; ability to care for others, to join in, help and be part of the learning community; respect and care for the people, objects and spaces in their home, community and the learning environment; respect and appreciation for environments and the interdependence of living things; and awareness about helping to sustain familiar environments.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
What do I know about the behaviour guidance strategies of the families and community?

Is responsibility for guiding children’s behaviour a shared process?

Have Elders contributed to the development of guidance policies and the introduction of new social skills?

What do I know about the play of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children?

Have I considered the full range of relationships that each child has experienced?

Have I considered ways in which the children demonstrate their independence and interdependence within community contexts?

B. Pedagogy
Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they plan for experiences that encourage group discussions and shared decision-making, and provide culturally sensitive choices and alternatives for children to regulate their behaviour. They should model strategies for children that support them to initiate interactions, seek assistance and join in play and social experiences, e.g. ‘Perhaps we can ask …?’ or ‘I wonder who could help us?’ Positive relationships are further promoted when educators encourage children to think about the feelings of others by labelling emotions in both SAE and FL with photographs or visual symbols, and encourage children’s peer relationships and their attempts at working independently and interdependently, e.g. ‘Wow — look at how fast we can go when we do it together’. They should support children to find peaceful solutions for conflicts and frustrations, e.g. ‘Perhaps you could try it this way …?’, ‘Let’s get another one together’, ‘Would you like to do it by yourself?’
Positive relationships are promoted when educators create environments that facilitate children’s relationships with peers, educators, families, community and the environment, e.g. spaces for yarning and sharing books together in both the indoor and outdoor environment. They should engage children in planning learning experiences and in decision-making about the organisation of the learning environment both inside and outside, model respect, care and appreciation for environments, and find ways for children to share their knowledge about caring for and learning from the land and sea. They should embed sustainable practices in daily routines and practices, involve children in making and maintaining aesthetically pleasing environments, and invite Elders and community members to share aspects of the children’s relationship to the physical world — land, water, air, bush, sky, rocks, weather patterns — through songs, dance and storytelling.

C. Documenting and reflecting


Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children make decisions and take responsibility for their own actions. They play and spend time with groups of children — brothers, sisters, cousins and friends of mixed ages, and sort out conflicts and problems in play with little adult intervention. They show generosity, unselfishness and compassion as modelled by family, Elders and community members. They show they know they have a particular association with and responsibility toward a certain animal or plant, and demonstrate an integrated understanding of the environment — people, animals, land and family. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence is seen when children remain at activities they are confident with or with friends they are secure with, and enjoy helping adults pack up, put away, clean and care for the environment. They seek support to play with and work alongside others, e.g. wait for a turn, join in, help others, and to respond to expectations and rules. They require visual prompts to communicate emotions, seek assistance, and manage unexpected situations. They join in small group experiences with the support of an adult or peer, and resolve conflicts and frustrations with support from like-language speaking adults. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children act independently of others and express an understanding of independence, e.g. ‘I do it’, ‘I help’ or interdependence ‘We do it’. They demonstrate self-confidence when managing and negotiating relationships, resources and spaces within the program. They take turns, wait, listen, offer ideas and join in with others to complete tasks, and help others to complete tasks, e.g. work together on projects, clean up and pack away. They develop friendships and express what it means to be a friend. They independently initiate care for the environment, and contribute to the program’s shared rules, rituals and boundaries and to the look and feel of the environment. (Add points relevant to your context.)

4.3 Being healthy and safe (EYLF Outcome 3: Children have a strong sense of wellbeing)
4.3.1 Safety and security
A kindergarten child becomes strong in their social and emotional wellbeing. They feel safe, secure and supported, and take increasing responsibility for their own health and safety.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — sense of emotional safety in familiar environments; enjoyment and satisfaction in exploring the indoor and outdoor play environments, healthy risk-taking and engaging in play and learning; confidence to communicate their needs for comfort and assistance; confidence that familiar people will provide support in times of need or change; strategies for understanding, expressing and self-regulating feelings and emotions; ability to keep themselves and others healthy and safe; capacity and competence in personal care and safety for themselves and others; and enjoyment of solitude, quietness, reflection and relaxation.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
Have I created an environment that is responsive to children’s understanding of time within family and community contexts? How can I accommodate children’s need for routines at the ‘right time’?

In what ways do the children demonstrate awareness of healthy and safe practices within family and community contexts? How can I build on this knowledge?

Do I allow the children to be self-sufficient in routines?

How do I involve families and community in sharing information about the children’s shared rituals and routines within the program?

Where can I access expert advice on specific health issues? How can I connect families with these services?

Are there times for reflection, relaxation and silence?

How do I show respect for children’s particular rituals or ways of doing things?

B. Pedagogy


Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they create an environment where children can be self-sufficient in eating, drinking, sleeping and toileting, e.g. a small table or island mat under a tree set with morning tea available for children to access when hungry, cosy spaces available for rest and sleep, using photo sequences of the children to prompt safety and good nutrition practices. They should take time to engage in enjoyable and trusting conversations with children and their families, and notice and respond sensitively to children’s emotional signals and cues. Safety and security are promoted when educators allow children to complete routines at their own pace, and seek their permission before assisting with personal health routines. They should discuss and reinforce safe and unsafe situations both in the kindergarten and in the community, and involve children in developing rules to keep the environment safe for all, and provide verbal and non-verbal direction in situations where children require support to remain safe. They should model and reinforce personal practices with children, e.g. eating healthy foods, blowing their nose, covering sneezes, washing hands, brushing teeth.
Safety and security are further promoted when educators invite Elders and community to share stories with health and safety messages, and incorporate songs, games, rhymes, stories, puppets, music and dance, or use a range of texts, songs, games and ICTs, in SAE and FLs, that support safe and healthy lifestyles and good nutrition. They should involve children in investigating or visiting services and individuals within the community that promote health and safety, and in preparing and sharing healthy foods with peers, family and community members. They should implement specific health and safety programs for children in collaboration with families and communities, e.g. The Breathing, Blowing, Coughing routine for Otitis media.

C. Documenting and reflecting


Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children demonstrate emotional closeness to multiple caregivers and to the community at large. They prefer to make their own decisions about the right time for familiar routines. They care for younger siblings and cousins, and seek emotional support and companionship from their peer group. They demonstrate well established self-help skills and choose when to eat, sleep and play, and show awareness of safety and healthy risk-taking, e.g. through swimming, fishing, hunting, community sport and recreation. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence is seen when children prefer closeness with familiar adults and peers when sharing a story, yarning together, listening to music or resting. They explore the indoor and outdoor environments with the support of familiar adults. They rely on support and visual prompts to become self-sufficient in eating, drinking, sleeping and toileting, and follow health and safety routines with support and modelling e.g. blowing noses, covering sneezes, washing hands, brushing teeth. They prefer to watch and listen to songs, games and stories that reinforce healthy and safe practices. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children participate happily and confidently within the environment. They contribute to shared rules about safe practices in the learning environment, and encourage others to be aware of healthy and safe practices. They show interest in familiar community members or services that promote health and safety, and imitate health and safety practices through songs, games, books, stories and role play. They indicate an awareness of changes in their bodies, e.g. growing taller, and identifying differences in their peers, e.g. eye colour, hair colour. They show enjoyment in moments of quietness, reflection and relaxation. (Add points relevant to your context.)

4.3.2 Physical activity
A kindergarten child is strong in their physical wellbeing. They gain control and strength for manipulating objects, tools and equipment with increasing complexity, and develop confidence, coordination and strength in large movement skills and challenges.

A. Planned learning


Educators focus on the following aspects of children’s learning — enthusiasm and enjoyment for physical play and activity; skills for visual tracking and coordinating hands, eyes and feet to achieve physical movements and actions; fundamental movement skills, including balancing, running, jumping, catching, hopping, skipping and kicking; skills for demonstrating spatial awareness and orienting themselves and moving around and through their environments safely; capabilities for exploring and responding to the environment with increasing integration and refinement; and delight in experimenting with space, balance, direction, form, rhythm and energy using music, dance and movement.

B. Pedagogy


Educators intentionally promote this learning, for example, when they build on the physical skills children have developed within the context of family and community, e.g. expertise in community sport, traditional games, hunting, fishing, swimming, dance and crafts. They should provide many opportunities for children to safely run, jump, climb, throw, kick, catch, bounce, dig, balance, swing, push, bend, stretch, roll, change direction, and free access to a large range of manipulative tools, mediums and materials (man-made and natural), on a daily basis, to cut, construct, sculpt, build, weave, hammer, carve, sew, thread, staple, fold, tear, draw, paint, and approximate symbols.
Physical activity is promoted when educators model and demonstrate techniques for using tools, materials and equipment, e.g. scissors, brushes, staplers. They should label children’s movements, in SAE and FLs, e.g. ‘That was a deadly kick’, ‘Look how far you can run’, ‘What a big stretch’, ‘How can we move this block?’, and create challenge in children’s physical activity, e.g. ‘How can you get up there?’, ‘I wonder how high you can go?’, ‘That’s a small space, I wonder if you can fit?’. They should encourage children to explore, share and model alternative ways to manipulate objects and move their body in space.
Physical activity is also promoted when educators invite community experts and Elders to share culturally specific knowledge and skills that integrate and extend children’s physical capabilities. They should design an environment that incorporates both quiet, private spaces and open, active spaces to develop children’s diverse physical competencies, and consult with families and communities to ensure that experiences incorporate local knowledge and skills, both contemporary and traditional, e.g. traditional cookery, weaving, spear making. They should provide many opportunities for children to use their hands to create and manipulate, e.g. natural materials, blocks, puzzles, construction sets, and incorporate contemporary and traditional action rhymes, songs, finger plays and games, in SAE and FLs, that develop fine motor control and hand-eye coordination.
Educators should provide games or adapted sports, e.g. soccer, rugby league, that develop whole body coordination, integrate planned and spontaneous movement, dance and physical activity across all areas of the program both inside and outside, and provide props to support movement and creative expression — feathers, ribbons, bells, masks, materials, face paint, and contemporary and traditional musical instruments.
As you reflect on your practices, ask yourself:
What do I know about the physical competencies that the children bring with them to a kindergarten program? How can I build on these to introduce new skills?

Do the children bring skills that are new to me? Can I learn from them?

How could I incorporate opportunities for fishing, hunting, swimming, sport, gathering food, craft making and taking part in community events into the program?

Is the kindergarten program physically based?

Do I integrate spontaneous opportunities for music, dance, physical activity and movement across the whole program?

Do I balance physical activity with quiet activity?

C. Documenting and reflecting
Educators look for evidence of children’s learning, such as the following.
In the familiar contexts of family and community, evidence is seen when children climb adeptly, skilfully run, throw, and swim, and feel entirely at home in their environment. They demonstrate keen visual and spatial skills. They enthusiastically participate in community sport and recreation, e.g. soccer, football, fishing, hunting, gathering, riding bareback, games, diving and swimming, and take considered risks and make their own decisions about safe physical play. They wait silently. They enjoy active involvement in the physical actions of songs, dances and games of the local community, enthusiastically experiment using their bodies in space, and willingly try out new climbing, movement and balancing challenges. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In new and unfamiliar contexts of kindergarten, evidence is seen when children manage outdoor play spaces and equipment with prompts and visual cues. They manipulate cutting and drawing tools with encouragement, modelling and support, e.g. use scissors, cut dough, use paint brushes. They participate and engage in sensory experiences with adult support and encouragement, e.g. water and sand play, and experiment with construction and manipulation materials to put together and take apart. They respond to familiar language related to movements with the support of like-language speaking adults. (Add points relevant to your context.)
In the familiar contexts of a culturally secure kindergarten, evidence is seen when children show agility, strength, flexibility, control, balance and coordination of their body in space. They safely run, jump, climb, throw, kick, catch, bounce, dig, balance, swing, push, bend, stretch, roll. They implement increased control of the fine movements of their hands, e.g. while drawing, painting, cutting, weaving, sculpting, and begin to demonstrate hand preference and to use a particular grip to manipulate equipment and manage tools. They visually track objects to hit a ball with a bat, or catch a ball or beanbag. They respond to familiar language related to movements, e.g. ‘This foot first’, ‘Can you bend this way?’, ‘Let’s run fast’, ‘Which block will you carry?’ ‘I wonder if it will fit here?’, ‘What happens if we turn it around?’ (Add points relevant to your context.)




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