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1709.11,60

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FOREST SERVICE HANDBOOK

Washington, D.C.


FSH 1709.11 - CIVIL RIGHTS HANDBOOK
Amendment No. 1709.11-2000-7
Effective March 16, 2000
POSTING NOTICE. Amendments are numbered consecutively by Handbook number and calendar year. Post by document name. Remove entire document and replace with this amendment. Retain this transmittal as the first page of this document. The last amendment to this Handbook was Amendment 1709.11-2000-6 to FSH 1709.11,60 Contents.
Superseded New

Document Name (Number of Pages)


60 thru 63.2--3 25 --
1709.11,60 --

Digest:
60.2 - Expands the objective of Forest Service Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) programs.
60.6 - Changes measures of accountability from the performance standards rating process to the performance evaluation process. Removes specific units of measure.
61.01 - Adds Departmental Regulation (DR) 4230-2 as an authority on the establishment and administration of special emphasis programs.
61.04b - Updates the names of Special Emphasis Programs and the Affirmative Employment and Recruitment Plan. Adds responsibilities for the Persons with Disabilities Program Manager and the Asian Pacific American Program Manager.
61.11 - Makes minor editorial and formatting changes throughout exhibit 01, which sets out a sample role statement for collateral duty Special Emphasis Program Managers. Adds persons with disabilities, in addition to minorities and women, as a group to be addressed in increasing workforce representation and in providing equal opportunity in human resources management processes. Includes American Sign Language as an example of a second language desirable or useful in certain positions. Adds the Institute to Forest Service units addressed in the role statement.
Digest--Continued:
61.12 - Recodes exhibit 01 and adds references to the Asian Pacific American Program and Persons with Disabilities Program.
61.21 - In the Planning Approach section, updates the names of Special Emphasis Programs and adds Asian Pacific Americans and persons with disabilities to the categories, in addition to women and minorities, to be addressed in increasing work force representation and in other areas.
61.3 - Adds direction on Special Emphasis Program Managers and removes obsolete direction on Special Emphasis Program Support.
61.3 - 61.36 - Makes minor editorial changes to direction on the roles of various Special Emphasis Program Managers.
62 - Changes the caption to Special Employment Authorities and Programs.
62.11 - Changes the caption for section 62.11 from Employment of the Physically Handicapped to Persons with Disabilities Employment Program and extends the scope of the program.
62.12 - Changes the caption of section 62.12 from Employment of the Mentally Retarded to Employment of Developmentally Disabled.
62.15 - Changes the caption from Student Cooperative Education Program to Student Career Experience Program.
63.1 - Expands the categories of Special Emphasis Program Managers to include the Persons with Disabilities Program Manager and Asian Pacific American Program Manager in the section addressing civil rights awards.
MIKE DOMBECK

Chief


FSH 1709.11 - CIVIL RIGHTS HANDBOOK

WO AMENDMENT 1709.11-2000-7

EFFECTIVE 03/16/2000
CHAPTER 60 - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
This chapter explains both the legal requirements and the basis for establishing specific special emphasis programs throughout the Forest Service (for further direction on legal authorities, see FSM 1701 and sec. 01 of this Handbook.) It provides the detailed direction and procedures for implementing the direction in FSM 1760.
The intended users of this chapter are Forest Service line officers, Civil Rights Directors/Coordinators, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Specialists, and Special Emphasis Program Managers. Direction in this chapter is designed to assist managers/specialists with procedural requirements and general guidelines for implementing successful, results-oriented special emphasis programs.
For direction on the EEO complaint process see FSM 1760 and Departmental Regulation (DR) 4300-7.
60.2 - Objectives. (FSM 1760.2). To establish a workforce that reflects the civilian population-at-large and to eradicate discrimination in the recruitment, selection, development, and advancement of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities.
60.3 - Policy. (FSM 1760.3).
60.4 - Responsibility. (FSM 1760.4).
60.5 - Definitions. (Sec. 05 of this Handbook).
60.6 - Accountability. The successful implementation of special emphasis programs should be measured through the performance evaluation process for employees who have direct responsibilities for these programs (FSM 1760.4, 6140; FSH 6109.13,
ch. 10).
61 - SPECIAL EMPHASIS PROGRAMS.
61.01 - Authority. Departmental Regulation (DR) 4230-2 provides direction on the establishment and administration of special emphasis programs in USDA agencies.
61.04 - Responsibility.
61.04a - Line Officers. Line officers are responsible for the successful implementation of their units' special emphasis programs (FSM 1760.4) by:
1. Providing professional and personal support and commitment;

2. Ensuring that the unit leadership team is aware of and participates in the programs;

3. Ensuring that the Special Emphasis Program Managers provide training to educate applicants, employees, and supervisors about program goals and objectives; and

4. Promoting employees' involvement in these programs.



61.04b - Special Emphasis Program Managers. The Special Emphasis Program Managers have the responsibility to:
1. Serve as advisors to unit line managers and the Civil Rights Director/Coordinator.

2. Periodically brief line managers and the Civil Rights Director/Coordinator on the progress of the Federal Women's Program, Hispanic Employment Program, American Indian and Alaska Native Program, African American Employees Program, Asian Pacific American Program, Persons with Disabilities Program, and other special emphasis programs established on the unit.

3. Participate in the development of the Affirmative Employment and Recruitment Plan for Civil Rights.

4. Review proposed and ongoing policies, procedures, and practices (for example, promotion and selection panels, award nominations, and selections) for impact on the employment and advancement of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. Advise line management and the Civil Rights Director/ Coordinator of potential adverse impacts and recommend alternative solutions.

5. Monitor Forest Service internal and external activities to ensure the involvement and participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities.

6. Work with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication on communications strategies to ensure that women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are informed and involved in programs, benefits, and services the Forest Service provides.

7. Advise and monitor the unit's success and progress as it relates to the Forest Service goals in the socioeconomic programs (FSM 1790) associated with contracting for services; for example, the Minority and Women Business Enterprise Program.

61.1 - Special Emphasis Program Resources and Requirements. Line managers at all levels shall establish the following special emphasis programs within their units and designate program managers: Federal Women's Program (FWP), Hispanic Employment Program (HEP), American Indian and Alaska Native Program (AIP), Asian Pacific American Program (APAP), African American Program (AAP), and Persons with Disabilities Program (PWD).
61.11 - Sample Role Statement for Collateral Duty Special Emphasis Program Manager. Exhibit 01 contains a sample role statement for a Special Emphasis Program Manager (SEPM). Exhibit 01, section 61.12, is a sample memorandum of understanding for a collateral duty SEPM.

61.11 - Exhibit 01
Sample Role Statement for Collateral Duty

Special Emphasis Program Manager (SEPM)
I. ROLE STATEMENT
The role of the (name of special emphasis program) Manager is as follows:
1. Serves as an advisor to the line manager and the Director of Civil Rights on activities and programs related to all employees within the unit.

2. Participates in the formulation of affirmative employment and recruitment plans to ensure that program elements define actions necessary for increasing the representation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in the work force and for providing equal opportunity in all human resource management processes, including recruiting, placement, training, upward mobility, and Forest Service assignments.

3. Maintains communication with other FWP/HEP/AIP/AAP/APAP/PWD managers and other units, the Office of Personnel Management, and other organizations in the public and private sectors to foster an exchange of ideas and to seek the best solution for carrying out an effective program.

4. Participates in recruitment efforts for qualified women, minorities, and persons with disabilities candidates for temporary and permanent positions and other programs that appointing offices use to meet staffing requirements. (Recruitment sources include employee resource groups; minority organizations; women's organizations; colleges, universities, vocational schools, and high schools where minority students are enrolled; and so on).

5. Assists in the identification of positions for which knowledge of a second language (such as Spanish or American Sign Language) is desirable or useful in carrying out the mission of the Forest Service and actively assists in recruitment for these positions.

6. Receives information through various contacts with employees (such as women, persons with disabilities, and minority employees) about their present utilization, career opportunities, and other problems that may give rise to dissatisfaction within the group and provides information to the appropriate SEPM.

7. Makes recommendations to line and staff officers and checks the adequacy of actions taken to correct inequities that are brought to the attention of the SEPM.

8. Serves as an integral part of the compliance review process, whether as a member of the team conducting unit and field evaluations, or by providing input to those reviews conducted by the Washington Office, Regions, Stations, the Area, the Institute, and so forth.



61.11 - Exhibit 01--Continued
9. Provides assistance to field units about appropriate SEPM training, references, and other sources of information at the Washington Office, Region, Station, or Institute level.

10. Assists in the development and presentation of civil rights programs and training for managers, supervisors, and employees (FSM 1740 and ch. 40 of this Handbook).

II. TIME ALLOTMENTS
Special Emphasis Program Managers (SEPM's) may be either full-time or collateral duty employees. Collateral duty assignments should adhere to the following: Official equal employment opportunity duties and responsibilities assigned to employees on a collateral basis must be described in the official position description. It is also acceptable to use an addendum to the position description that covers the position the employee occupies. The addendum should both reflect the formal qualification requirements imposed on the position by the EEO collateral assignment and allow for a determination that there is no grade level effect of the assignment.
III. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
1. Special Emphasis Program Managers (Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)) Collateral Assignments. SEPM/EEO collateral assignments are those official EEO duties and responsibilities assigned to an employee in addition to the primary duties and responsibilities of the primary position that the employee occupies. These EEO collateral assignments have the following characteristics:

a. The employee who receives the assignment must meet qualifications requirements for EEO collateral assignments published in the OPM Qualification Standards Handbook (commonly called the X-118 Handbook) in the EEO series (260).

b. The EEO collateral assignment does not constitute the primary purpose for establishing or continuing the position.

c. For purposes of the EEO collateral assignment, the employee receives technical guidance and review, but not supervision, from an individual other than the regular supervisor (for example, EEO official or line manager with overall EEO responsibility for the agency or field unit).

d. The assignment is not a primary duty of the position (it must constitute less than 50 percent of the employee's work time).

e. The EEO collateral assignment may be ended or reassigned to another employee, at leadership's discretion, without complying with adverse action regulations.



61.11 - Exhibit 01--Continued
2. Required Action. EEO collateral assignments must be described in writing and made a part of the official position description of the position occupied by the employee who receives the assignment. An official personnel action is not required when EEO collateral duties are changed, added to, or deleted from a position, but units must amend a position description to recognize an addition, deletion, or change of an EEO collateral assignment. The position description or addendum must:

a. Specify which official provides technical guidance and reviews the work of the employee, and describe the nature of this guidance and review.

b. Include the percentage or hours per week or month of the employee's work time that is spent on the EEO assignment.

c. Describe the duties and responsibilities of the collateral assignment in detail, including the size of the unit, its geographic coverage, and the number of employees. This gives an indication of the scope of the responsibility.

Persons assigned to Federal Women's Program (FWP), Hispanic Employment Program (HEP), American Indian and Alaska Native Program (AIP), Asian Pacific American Program (APAP), African American Program (AAP), and Persons with Disabilities Program (PWD) Manager positions on a collateral duty basis should be provided specific training, applicable to the role, responsibilities, and functions of the position, within 90 days of the appointment, if it is available through the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), the Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Corporate Training Office, or some other qualified training organization within that time frame. If training cannot be provided within 90 days, provide it at the earliest possible date.
3. Documentation of Conditions of Assignments or Evaluation of Employee Performance. Descriptions of certain conditions involving how and when employees receive work assignments, and how and when such assignments are adjusted, appraised, and supported by resources, must accompany the Civil Rights collateral duty assignment. The EEO official, in consultation with the employee's immediate supervisor, must prepare a memorandum of understanding outlining the following conditions concerning the employee's assignment:

a. How and when the employee is to be assigned SEPM work. The employee, the EEO official for the unit, and the immediate supervisor shall meet to discuss the SEPM assignment, and when adjustments may be necessary in the regular work assignment to permit time for the SEPM assignment. SEPM assignments need not flow through the immediate supervisor, but make every effort to keep the immediate supervisor informed of civil rights assignments. Giving an employee multiple SEPM assignments is not recommended, except where



61.11 - Exhibit 01--Continued
warranted by the size of the work force. If two or more assignments aremade on a collateral basis to one person, one of the assignments may suffer. However, an employee may be assigned as a general EEO specialist full-time with a Federal Women's Program (FWP), Hispanic Employment Program (HEP), American Indian and Alaska Native Program (AIP), Asian Pacific American (APAP), African American Program (AAP), Persons with Disabilities (PWD), or EEO Manager assignment included as a collateral duty and responsibility.

b. How the percentage of hours of the employee's work time devoted to EEO/SEPM work is to be adjusted to meet program goals. A minimum of 20 percent and no more than 50 percent of an employee's work time shall be devoted to the collateral duty SEPM assignment. Periodic reviews (for example, every 90 days) must be conducted by the respective EEO official to determine the adequacy of the time allocated.

For SEPM's, the following suggested percentages of time may serve as a guide:

(1) Up to 500 employees: 20 percent


(2) 501 to 1,000 employees: 25 percent
(3) 1,001 to 1,500 employees: 30-35 percent
(4) 1,501 to 2,000 employees: 35-40 percent
(5) Over 2,000 employees: 100 percent

c. Titles. The Forest Service is no longer using the title "EEO Coordinator." Instead, use the title "EEO Manager" for those persons carrying out the responsibilities formerly delegated to coordinators.

d. How the employee's performance of SEPM work is to be included in the overall rating. For example:

(1) The immediate supervisor and the EEO official may prepare separate written performance evaluations to be combined into one rating;

(2) The immediate supervisor may consult with the EEO official for input to the rating; or

(3) The EEO official and the supervisor may develop performance elements to be included in the performance standards and performance evaluation worksheets.

e. How and when the employee is to receive clerical support and office facilities to perform EEO duties. For example, this could include office space for private counseling sessions. Units are reminded that Executive order 11478 (sec. 01 of this Handbook) and sec. 7a(2) of DR 4230-2 state that it is the responsibility of each line officer to provide sufficient resources to administer the SEP.

61.12 - Sample Memorandum of Understanding for Collateral Duty Special Emphasis Program Manager. Exhibit 01 contains a sample Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for a Special Emphasis Program Manager (SEPM) assigned part-time to the program as an official work assignment collateral to other position responsibilities.
61.12 - Exhibit 01
Sample Memorandum of Understanding for Collateral Duty

Special Emphasis Program Manager (SEPM)
The employee serves as the [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] Manager at the request of the [Forest Service EEO official] with concurrence of the line manager. The [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] Manager advises the [Forest Service EEO official] on matters affecting the employment and advancement of [women, minorities, and persons with disabilities], attends job fairs or other functions at local high schools, colleges, and universities to obtain names of applicants; attends training conferences and conventions; sends recruitment literature to schools and community groups; sponsors workshops and other training programs; keeps the National Special Emphasis Program (SEP) Manager informed of field activities affecting women, minorities, or persons with disabilities and of problem areas (if applicable); counsels employees upon request (but does not act as an EEO counselor); and disseminates the program information received from the Service-wide and Department [SEP] Manager to the unit.
The collateral duty [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] Manager reports to the [EEO official] on EEO matters and is to be allowed the equivalent of [xx] hours a month [or week] [or ___ percent of time] to perform the various duties and responsibilities of [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] Manager. In work responsibilities other than [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] Manager, the employee reports to and is responsible to the employee's day-to-day supervisor.
The supervisor in the regular work assignment shall consult with the supervisor in [FWP, HEP, AIP, APAP, AAP, or PWD] matters and give the collateral duty SEPM or EEO employee a composite rating of both areas of responsibility in conjunction with the employee's performance appraisal.

_____________________________

EEO Official Date


_______________________________

Supervisor Date
________________________________

SEPM Date


61.2 - Special Emphasis Program Planning.
61.21 - Planning Approach. To identify problem areas and ensure results, conduct an in-depth analysis of the unit's work force, considering each factor in terms of the population identified (for example, women, Hispanics, American Indians, or persons with disabilities).
1. Examine such factors as:

a. Unit population by occupation and grade level.

b. Training statistics.

c. Promotions by occupation and grade level.

d. Turnover rate by occupation series.

e. Unit-wide average grade level.

f. Skills available in the unit's work force, and in the Service-wide, Federal Government, and national work force.

g. Award nominees and selections.

2. For the Hispanic Employment Program (HEP), African American (AAP), Asian Pacific American Program (APAP), American Indian and Alaska Native Program (AIP), and Persons with Disabilities Program (PWD), determine the percentage of each group as found in the local, State, or regional civilian labor force versus the percentage in the unit's work force.

3. After reviewing all resource materials and carefully analyzing the work force, address major problem areas that become evident in program objectives, such as lack of a particular group in higher level positions, limited developmental training, or concentration of the target group in certain disciplines, certain occupational areas, or some organizational components.

4. Work to ensure coordination among the officials involved with planning. Units usually have the greatest success when there is coordination among the Special Emphasis Program Manager, the Civil Rights Director or Coordinator, and a mix of employee representatives named as responsible officials in the unit's plan for development and implementation.

5. To accomplish program objectives, use the following recommended techniques:

a. To intensify recruitment of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities with degrees in the professions of forester, geologist, engineer, accountant, landscape architect, soil scientist, and so forth. This effort is carried out as part of the unit's implementation of the Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Plan (FEORP).

b. To expand recruitment to other than normal entry-level positions.

c. To use student career experience agreements and other programs as mechanisms to improve employment through recruitment.

d. To use and improve the Upward Mobility Program (especially important to women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who may have no other way to move out of low-level, dead-end jobs) to provide an opportunity to move into administrative, professional support (Human Resources Specialist, Contracting Specialist, Support Services Specialist, and so forth), and technical jobs (Engineering, Forestry, Archeological Technician, and so forth).

e. To ensure that meaningful training and experiences are available for women, minorities, and persons with disabilities so that they may qualify for higher level jobs.

f. To develop and conduct civil rights training.

g. To develop and conduct ethnic and sexual harassment training.

h. To provide career counseling guidance.



61.3 - Special Emphasis Program Managers. Special emphasis programs cut across all civil rights components, although affirmative employment and recruitment is particularly important to the success of special emphasis programs. Special Emphasis Program Managers are concerned with identifying problems and issues affecting their constituent groups and advising management on actions to help increase the representation and participation of women, minorities, or persons with disabilities in Forest Service employment and programs.
61.31 - Federal Women's Program. The following are recommended operating strategies essential to a successful Federal Women's Program:
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment Plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the Federal Women's Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting women in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect women.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect on women.

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on women.

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the Federal Women's Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to women's groups and to individuals who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the Forest Service.

9. Refer female employees to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of women employees.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on women's concerns from State and national conventions, such as Federally Employed Women.

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage female employees to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with a status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with other officials who have civil rights responsibilities.

61.32 - Hispanic Employment Program. The following are recommended operating strategies essential to a successful Hispanic Employment Program:
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment Plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the Hispanic Employment Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting Hispanics in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect Hispanics.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect upon the various Hispanic communities.

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on Hispanics.

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the Hispanic Employment Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to Hispanic groups and to individuals who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the agency.

9. Refer Hispanic employees to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of Hispanic employees.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on Hispanic concerns from State and national conventions, such as the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), IMAGE, and G.I. Forum.

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage Hispanic employees to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with a status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with other officials who have civil rights responsibilities.

16. Review information booklets and whether any should be printed in Spanish and coordinate with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication to have them printed.



61.33 - American Indian and Alaska Native Program. The following are operating strategies essential to a successful American Indian and Alaska Native Program.
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the American Indian and Alaska Native Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect American Indians and Alaska Natives.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect upon American Indians and Alaska Natives.

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on American Indians and Alaska Natives.

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the American Indian and Alaska Native Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to American Indian and Alaska Native groups and to individuals who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the Forest Service.

9. Refer American Indian and Alaska Native employees to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of American Indian and Alaska Native employees.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on American Indian and Alaska Native concerns from State and national conventions, such as the National Conference on American Indians (NCAI).

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage American Indian and Alaska Native employees to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with a status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with others who have civil rights responsibilities.

16. Review information booklets and determine whether any should be multilingual and coordinate with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication to have them printed.



61.34 - African American Program. The following are operating strategies essential to a successful African American Program.
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment Plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the African American Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting African American employees in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect African American employees.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect upon various African American communities.

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on African Americans.

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the African American Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to African American groups and to individuals who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the Forest Service.

9. Refer African American employees to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of African American employees.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on African American concerns from State and national conventions, such as the National Urban League.

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage African American employees to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with a status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with other civil rights officials who have civil rights responsibilities.

16. Review information booklets and determine whether any should be multilingual and coordinate with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication to have them printed.



61.35 - Asian Pacific American Program. The following are operating strategies essential to a successful Asian Pacific American Program.
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment Plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the Asian Pacific American Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting Asian Pacific American employees in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect Asian Pacific American employees.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect upon various Asian Pacific American communities.

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on Asian Pacific Americans.

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the Asian Pacific American Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to Asian Pacific American groups and to individuals who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the Forest Service.

9. Refer Asian Pacific American employees to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of Asian Pacific American employees.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on Asian Pacific Americans concerns from State and national conventions.

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage Asian Pacific American employees to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with a status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with other civil rights officials who have civil rights responsibilities.

16. Review information booklets and determine whether any should be multilingual and coordinate with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication to have them printed.



61.36 - Persons with Disabilities Program. The following are operating strategies essential to a successful Persons with Disabilities Program.
1. Provide assistance to the Regional Forester, the Station, Area, or Institute Director, the Forest Supervisor, and the District Ranger in the preparation and implementation of civil rights plans (which includes non-EEO areas).

2. Monitor Affirmative Employment Plans to ensure that plans address the objectives of the Persons with Disabilities Program.

3. Identify problems/issues affecting employees with disabilities in the work place.

4. Make recommendations related to problems and special needs that affect employees with disabilities.

5. Participate in policy, planning, or development of programs to ensure the consideration of those factors that have a direct effect upon various disability communities (such as the deaf community).

6. Review unit direction and guidelines to ensure that there are no adverse effects on persons with disabilities

7. Advise the unit head about interpretation and implementation of the Persons with Disabilities Program requirements.

8. Provide assistance or referral to persons with disabilities and related groups who seek assistance with benefits and services offered by the Forest Service.

9. Refer employees with disabilities to equal employment opportunity (EEO) counselor/mediators and, when appropriate, advise EEO counselor/mediators of special concerns of employees with disabilities.

10. Participate in job information fairs conducted by community groups, schools, colleges, or universities and provide current information on concerns of persons with disabilities from State and national conventions, such as the President's Council on Employment of Persons with Disabilities.

11. Participate as a member of, or resource to, the Civil Rights Advisory Committee at the respective unit.

12. Encourage employees with disabilities to develop their skills.

13. Visit community groups, schools, colleges, universities, and so forth, to provide information about employment, programs, and services.

14. Provide the unit head with status report on accomplishments.

15. Work closely with other SEPM's to exchange ideas and to coordinate between the programs and with others who have civil rights responsibilities.

16. Review informational materials in printed format and other media and determine whether any should be in alternative formats (FSM 1630, 1640) for persons with disabilities, and coordinate with the Public Affairs Office/Office of Communication to have them printed or produced.



62 - SPECIAL EMPLOYMENT AUTHORITIES AND PROGRAMS. The continued use and advocacy of the following special programs in sections 62.1 and 62.2 help increase both entry and upward movement of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities within the Forest Service's work force.
Additional special programs capable of enhancing affirmative employment and recruitment selections include: The Worker Trainee Program; Peace Corps and Vista Programs authority; and Volunteers Program.
62.1 - Employment-Related Programs.
62.11 - Persons With Disabilities Employment Program. (FSM 6133). At the national level the program for persons with disabilities has representation in both the Human Resources Management Staff and the Civil Rights Staff. The National program manager is located in the Civil Rights Staff in the Washington Office. At Regions and Stations, the Area, and the Institute, the program may be found in either the Civil Rights Staff or the Human Resources Management Staff. This program addresses the recruitment, employment, and advancement of persons with disabilities. Accessibility and accommodation are strong focus areas in this program. Many units have established Accessibility Coordinators to ensure Forest Service sites and facilities meet all guidelines for persons with disabilities.
62.12 - Employment of Developmentally Disabled. This program provides meaningful employment opportunities for developmentally disabled individuals. Consult with the State vocational rehabilitation agency for possible placements (FSM 6133).
62.13 - Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Appointments. This program provides meaningful employment for veterans from the Vietnam era (Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Assistance (VRA) Act of 1974; Pub.L. 93-508;
29 U.S.C. 1721).
62.14 - Student Temporary Employment Program. The Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP) provides students with opportunities and consideration for temporary employment. This program includes, but is not limited to, students majoring in disciplines that could lead to Forest Service careers
(FSM 6130; FSH 6109.12, ch. 50).
62.15 - Student Career Experience Program. The Student Career Experience Program (SCEP) provides graduate, baccalaureate, and nonbaccalaureate students with the opportunity to combine periods of study with periods of study-related employment in the public or private sector. Under this program, units must adequately plan for the noncompetitive conversion of career experience students who have demonstrated an acceptable level of performance and have exhibited the potential for being highly productive career employees (FSM 6130).
62.16 - Federal Junior Fellowship Program. This program provides graduating high school seniors with an opportunity for vacation period employment, coupled with meaningful training while the student/employee attends college.
62.2 - Upward Mobility Program. (FSM 6134). Upward Mobility is a systematic management effort that focuses Federal personnel policy and practice on the development of employees in pay levels below GS-9 or equivalent who are in positions or occupational series that do not enable them to realize their full potential.
62.21 - Upward Mobility Plan Requirements. The purpose of the Upward Mobility Program is to meet the needs of managers in terms of managing the organization and of using employees' potential. To meet these needs, unit line managers shall develop upward mobility plans. These plans shall be an integral part of the unit's Affirmative Employment Plan for civil rights. The Washington Office, Director of Human Resources Management, shall develop a Service-wide plan that describes the total Upward Mobility Program effort. That plan shall contain guidance for field installations. See FSM 6134 for Upward Mobility Program requirements and basic planning approach. As a minimum, civil rights officials at all levels shall:
1. Assist line managers in using the Upward Mobility Program to attain civil rights goals.

2. Ensure that the Affirmative Employment Plan includes use of the Forest Service Upward Mobility Program.

3. Participate in Forest Service Upward Mobility Program reviews to determine progress toward achieving affirmative employment and recruitment goals and objectives.

4. Coordinate activities with personnel officials to ensure achievement of affirmative employment and recruitment goals.



63 - CIVIL RIGHTS AWARDS. Notable achievements in civil rights should be recognized by an appropriate award.
A quality increase or special achievement award of some type can be a strong incentive to the awardee and others to excel in civil rights. Awards for civil rights performance may be given to full-time or collateral equal employment opportunity (EEO) officials, special emphasis program managers, supervisors, managers, and employees. These awards should acknowledge only outstanding achievements, not general recognition of service as a part-time EEO official or for general support of the Civil Rights Program.
Awards for part-time EEO officials should originate with the official to whom they report on civil rights matters or employee resource programs. For instance, consider officials for awards in the following circumstances: supervisors and managers who have done outstanding work in training the economically disadvantaged; who have developed excellent working relationships with schools, organizations, or other sources of minority, women, or persons with disabilities job candidates; who have been instrumental in restructuring jobs to provide better career ladders; or who have encouraged employees to progress through excellent career counseling or training activities.
63.1 - Examples of Achievements That May Merit Civil Rights Awards. The following are some examples of the types of achievements that may merit awards:
1. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) counselors who have established a special rapport with employees and leadership as evidenced by a high rate of resolving EEO cases, or who have made special efforts to explain their roles to employees and leadership.

2. Managers for the Federal Women's Program, Hispanic Employment Program, American Indian and Alaska Native Program, African American Program, Asian Pacific American Program, and Persons with Disabilities Program, who have developed specific recommendations or actions to overcome identified problems/issues. General recommendations or identification of problems/issues alone would not merit special recognition.

3. Civil Rights Advisory Committees, either as individual members or as a group, who have fully developed and implemented significant civil rights projects necessary for providing equal employment opportunity and equal access.

4. Personnel or administrative officers who have developed effective recruiting programs that increased the numbers of minority, persons with disabilities, and women employees, and who have also developed outstanding upward mobility and career counseling programs.

5. Civil Rights Directors or Deputy EEO Officers who have implemented an effective civil rights project, whether in recruiting, upward mobility, training, or evaluation. The principal factor in making an award is the implementation of a specific program beyond that which would usually be expected.

6. Employees who do not have assigned civil rights responsibilities may merit awards for outstanding efforts in community activities which impact the Forest Service Civil Rights Program, for suggesting significant improvement in the Civil Rights Program, or for specific contributions to the successful completion of work on task forces or work groups related to civil rights.

7. Staff persons who have demonstrated energetic support toward achieving affirmative employment and recruitment goals, such as Administrative Services Staff personnel for a Minority Business Enterprise Program showing a significant increase in female and minority procurement activities, or fiscal agents who have demonstrated aggressive pursuit in auditing for nondiscrimination in Federally financed programs.

63.2 - Range of Civil Rights Awards. Exhibit 01 lists the types of awards that are available for civil rights purposes. Use them when appropriate.
63.2 - Exhibit 01


Type of Award


Who can Receive


Reason of Giving Award


Nomination Procedures


Quality increase (cash award)

Primarily line management and/or managers and supervisors having civil rights as an ongoing and recognized part of their regular assignments.

Would be given to an individual who has performed major civil rights activities to the extent that the individual is now considered to be a characteristic of the person's usual performance.

*Note, a quality increase is given only to those people who perform all of their assigned duties well; therefore, for a person other than a full-time Civil Rights Specialist, Civil Rights would constitute only one of the major reasons for granting a quality increase.




Nominations can take place any time during the year. Initiate nominations with Form AD 287-2.

Superior Performance Award (cash award)

Same as for quality increase.

Would be given to an individual who has performed a civil rights activity(s) in a manner substantially exceeding normal requirements, over a sustained period of time. *Note, since this award can be granted to a person who performs just one part of the job well, the award can be given solely for a civil rights purpose.


Same as for quality increase.

Special Act Award (cash award)

Any Forest Service Employee.

Would be given to a person who has achieved a singular civil rights achievement, which is easily recognized and significant.

*Note, a person does not have to have civil rights as a part of the regular job assignment to qualify for a special act award.





Same as for quality increase.


63.2 - Exhibit 01--Continued


Type of Award

Who can Receive

Reason of Giving Award


Nomination Procedures


Chief's Annual Civil Rights Award (cash award)

Any Forest Service employee, specifically people who illustrate outstanding leadership and full participation that fosters civil rights in the Forest Service.

Would be given to a person who openly espouses the Chief's civil rights position and shows a high degree of effectiveness in making this position a reality in the Forest Service.

Annual nominations by the Washington Office Civil Rights Staff to the Chief. (More than one person can receive an award per year.)


Certificate of Appreciation (non-cash award)

Any Forest Service employee.

Would be used to show appreciation for the visible civil rights contributions of an employee or group of employees.

Reference

FSM 6145. The certificate (Forms AD-141 or AD-141A) can be signed at a very low or very high level. The certificate is very flexible, and has a space for a citation. When a group of employees are being honored, each employee should get a certificate.




Letter of Appreciation (non-cash award)

Any Forest Service employee.

Would be used as frequently as necessary to courteously show appreciation by a CR Director, Regional Forester, Deputy Regional Forester, Forest Supervisor, District Ranger, and so forth, for individual acts of civil rights performance.


Write letter and ensure that the letter is placed in the appropriate file(s).



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