Foreign Affairs Volume 95, Issue 1, Jan/Feb 2016 Title: Inequality and Modernization Authors: Inglehart, Ronald Abstract



Download 58.15 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size58.15 Kb.
Foreign Affairs

Volume 95, Issue 1, Jan/Feb 2016

1. Title: Inequality and Modernization

Authors: Inglehart, Ronald

Abstract: During the past century, economic inequality in the developed world has traced a massive U-shaped curve -- starting high, curving downward, then curving sharply back up again. This inequality was sustained throughout history and into the early capitalist era. Today, large economic gains are still being made in developed countries, but they are going primarily to those at the very top of the income distribution, whereas those lower down have seen their real incomes stagnate or even diminish. Today the conflict is no longer between the working class and the middle class; it is between a tiny elite and the great majority of citizens. This means that the crucial questions for future politics in the developed world will be how and when that majority develops a sense of common interest. The more current trends continue, the more pressure will build up to tackle inequality once again. The signs of such a stirring are already visible, and in time, the practical consequences will be as well.
2. Title: Inequality and Globalization

Authors: Bourguignon, François

Abstract: When thinking about inequality, it makes sense to approach the world as a single community. When looking at the world through this lens, some notable trends stand out. The first is that global inequality greatly exceeds inequality within any individual country. This observation should come as no surprise, since global inequality reflects the enormous differences in wealth between the world's richest and the world's poorest countries, not just the differences within them. Much more striking is the fact that, in a dramatic reversal of the trend that prevailed for most of the twentieth century, global inequality has declined markedly since 2000. Even as global inequality has declined, however, inequality within individual countries has crept upward. To counteract this trend, states should pursue policies aimed at redistributing income, strengthen the regulation of the labor and financial markets, and develop international arrangements that prevent firms from avoiding taxes by shifting their assets or operations overseas.
3. Title: How to Create a Society of Equals

Authors: Rosanvallon, Pierre

Abstract: There has been much discussion of rising economic inequality in the developed world recently, along with a generalized sense that the problem has grown to intolerable proportions. But at the same time, there has been little movement to address the situation; instead, there is tacit acceptance of many specific forms of inequality and the processes that produce it. The result is widespread discontent together with practical passivity. If inequality is to be reduced once more, therefore, the effort will have to be grounded in a solid, shared conception of what equality involves and why it is worth promoting. There are two main contenders today for such a conception. One, the populist option, redefines equality as social identity or homogeneity. The other, the social-liberal option, emphasizes equality of opportunity. Both have flaws. A theory of equality needs to focus on the structure of society. It should rest on three principles: a recognition of people's singularity, the organization of reciprocity, and the constitution of commonality.
4. Title: Equality and American Democracy

Authors: Allen, Danielle

Abstract: Since the trend toward rising economic inequality in the US became apparent in the 1990s, scholars and commentators have heatedly debated its causes and consequences. What has been less evident is a vigorous positive discussion about what equality means and how it might be pursued. In contrast to the early years of the republic, during which equality and liberty were understood to reinforce each other, by the middle of the twentieth century, it had become commonplace to invoke the idea of an "eternal conflict" between the two values, as a classic 1960 libertarian article put it. The rise of industrialization, which changed the balance of power among land, labor, and capital. Political equality ultimately rests not on the right to vote or the right to hold office but on the rights of association and free expression. It is these rights that support contestation of the status quo, whether that is maintained by the government or by social majorities.
5. Title: How to Spread the Wealth

Authors: Atkinson, Anthony B.

Abstract: As growth slows in mature economies across the developed world, economic inequality has reached new heights. The main reason for the rise in inequality is the explosion in gains accruing to those at the very top of the income distribution. But the circumstances of those at the bottom have contributed, too. Global leaders have taken note, and they are worried. But what officials have not said, by and large, is what they would do about it. Many seem to have resigned themselves to an ever-less-equal world. The good news is that present levels of inequality are not inevitable. If governments are serious about tackling inequality -- and that is a big if -- then there are concrete steps they can take. Some of these actions might be controversial and difficult, and they would create losers as well as winners. But they are the best practical way to make a dent in a frustratingly persistent problem.
6. Title: Brazil's Antipoverty Breakthrough

Authors: Tepperman, Jonathan

Abstract: In recent years, as public anxiety over growing inequality has intensified, policymakers and academics have started scrambling for some increasingly extreme solutions. Over the last dozen years or so, one country -- Brazil -- has shown that there's a far better, less provocative, and more market-friendly way to fight inequality. Rolled out a few months after his election, Fome Zero (Zero Hunger) eventually featured more than 40 different programs run by close to 20 government ministries. But one initiative stood at the campaign's core: Bolsa Familia (Family Grant), a poverty-fighting effort that was revolutionary in its size, ambition, and design. Rather than provide the poor with goods or services, as most development programs did at the time, Bolsa Familia would do something far more daring: simply hand out money. The program was also structured in such a way that it would ultimately benefit all Brazilians, not just those at the bottom.
7. Title: Obama's Way

Authors: Kaplan, Fred

Abstract: On Jan 28, 2009, barely a week into his presidency, Barack Obama met with the US military's top generals and admirals on their own turf, inside "the tank", the Joint Chiefs of Staff's conference room on the second floor of the Pentagon. Obama's meaning was clear: he had been dealt a bad hand (two unpopular wars, alienated allies, the deepest recession in decades), but he would find a way to deal with the world as it was. Seven years later, many officers and defense officials, including some who were so impressed with Obama at the start, look back at his presidency as following a different style of governing. They laud the historic accomplishments and they acknowledge that he has often tried to make the best of bad choices. The common critique of Obama's foreign policy is that he evades hard decisions, that he is allergic to military force if it risks American casualties or escalation, that there is often a mismatch between his words and his deeds.
8. Title: Time to Get Tough on Tehran

Authors: Cohen, Eliot; Edelman, Eric; Takeyh, Ray

Abstract: The nuclear deal that the US and five other great powers signed with Iran in July 2015 is the final product of a decade-long effort at arms control. That effort included sanctions in an attempt to impede Iran's quest for a nuclear weapons capability. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, ranks as one of the most deficient arms control agreements in history. US policymakers since the days of Pres Ronald Reagan have failed to understand that there can be no rapprochement between the two governments, because, as Iran's leaders understand, that would undo the very existence of the Iranian regime. Given the serious challenge Iran poses to US interests, Washington should seek to roll back the country's growing influence in the Middle East while systematically eroding the foundations of its power. In the long term, the Islamic Republic will join the Soviet Union and other ideological relics of the twentieth century in eventual collapse. Until then, however, there can be no real peace between Washington and Tehran.
9. Title: When Congress Gets Mad

Authors: Casey, Steven

Abstract: The scholar Edward Corwin famously described the separation of powers between the executive and the legislative branches set out in the US Constitution as "an invitation to struggle for the privilege of directing American foreign policy". With different parties controlling different branches of government, partisan politics tends to intensify this struggle, and the consequences can be ugly. What the current situation most resembles is the early Cold War era, when Republicans in Congress made foreign policy central to their attacks on Pres Harry Truman. The historical parallel is not exact -- they never are -- but a look back at the earlier strife offers useful context for evaluating today's bitter divisions and their likely outcome. The main takeaway is not comforting to contemporary Republicans: trying to fight a no-holds-barred war over foreign policy against a determined White House can limit the effectiveness of US efforts abroad and discredit those who launch what can come to be seen as obstructionist assaults.
10. Title: How China Sees Russia

Authors: Ying, Fu

Abstract: At a time when Russian relations with the US and western European countries are growing cold, the relatively warm ties between China and Russia have attracted renewed interest. Scholars and journalists in the West find themselves debating the nature of the Chinese-Russian partnership and wondering whether it will evolve into an alliance. The Chinese-Russian relationship is a stable strategic partnership and by no means a marriage of convenience: it is complex, sturdy, and deeply rooted. Changes in international relations since the end of the Cold War have only brought the two countries closer together. Nevertheless, China has no interest in a formal alliance with Russia. Rather, Beijing hopes that China and Russia can maintain their relationship in a way that will provide a safe environment for the two big neighbors to achieve their development goals and to support each other through mutually beneficial cooperation, offering a model for how major countries can manage their differences and cooperate in ways that strengthen the international system.
11. Title: Putin's Power Play in Syria

Authors: Stent, Angela

Abstract: At the end of September, Russia began conducting air strikes in Syria, ostensibly to combat terrorist groups. The strikes constitute Russia's biggest intervention in the Middle East in decades. Russia is now a player in the Syrian crisis, and the US will have to find a way to deal with it. As the US gears up for the 2016 presidential election, it faces two central challenges in deciding how to deal with Russia. First, it needs to determine the nature of Russia's objectives in Syria and Ukraine. Second, because Russia depends on a highly personalized political system, Obama and his would-be successors need to decide how to manage relations with Putin, an especially difficult task given the overwhelming pressure on the campaign trail to look tough. Continuing to isolate Russia is not likely to work. Instead, the next US administration should clearly communicate to the Kremlin what American interests and values are and join with US allies in resisting further Russian attempts to unravel the post-Cold War order.
12. Title: Not-So-Smart Sanctions

Authors: Ashford, Emma

Abstract: After Russia seized Crimea from Ukraine in March 2014, the Obama administration responded with what has become the go-to foreign policy tool these days: targeted sanctions. Considering the dire state of Russia's economy, these sanctions might appear to be working. The International Monetary Fund estimated, Russia's GDP was to shrink by more than three percent. Yet the Russian government has been able to weather the crisis by providing emergency capital to wobbling banks, allowing the ruble to float freely, and making targeted cuts to the state budget while providing fiscal stimulus through increased spending on pensions. Even with continued low oil prices, the International Monetary Fund expects that growth will return to the Russian economy in 2016, albeit at a sluggish 1.5%. If Western leaders want to resolve the Ukraine crisis and meaningfully constrain Russia's bad behavior, they should abandon their failed sanctions-centric policy and focus on other measures instead, such as efforts to aid Ukraine economically, obstruct Russia's military modernization, and increase European energy independence.
13. Title: The Transatlantic Data War

Authors: Farrell, Henry; Newman, Abraham

Abstract: Last October, the European Court of Justice struck down the Safe Harbor agreement, a 15-year-old transatlantic arrangement that permitted US companies to transfer data, such as people's Google-search histories, outside the EU. In invalidating the agreement, the ECJ found that the blurry relationship between private-sector data collection and national security in the US violates the privacy rights of EU citizens whose data travel overseas. The decision leaves US technology companies with extensive international operations on shaky legal ground. The main reason that US companies and officials are flustered is that they are used to being the ones who make the rules. Although the ECJ has no jurisdiction over the US National Security Agency, it does have jurisdiction over the European operations of American firms. Its ruling demonstrates that the more Washington tries to leverage the interdependence of the global system for its own security goals, the more other states and their courts will actively resist a US-centered global economy.
14. Title: Getting to Democracy

Authors: Lowenthal, Abraham F; Bitar, Sergio

Abstract: A successful democratic transition begins long before elected politicians take office. The opposition must first gain enough public support to challenge the regime's capacity to govern and position itself as a plausible contender for power. Opposition leaders have to mobilize protests; denounce the imprisonment, torture, and expulsion of dissidents; and erode the regime's national and international legitimacy. This often requires bridging deep disagreements among the opposition about aims, leadership, strategies, and tactics. Democratic opposition movements also need to build bridges with those who cooperated in the past with the regime but who may now be ready to support democratization. Focusing on past grievances tends to be counterproductive, so democratic reformers should instead consistently project a positive and forward-looking vision of the transition to counter the pervasive fear that authoritarian regimes instill. Once the opposition takes power, the most important step is to end violence and restore order while ensuring that all security forces act within the law. Despite all the obstacles, however, democratic transitions have succeeded in the past.
15. Title: Latin Americans Stand Up To Corruption

Authors: Castañeda, Jorge G.

Abstract: Just a few years ago, Latin America was on a roll. Its economies, riding on the back of the Chinese juggernaut, were flourishing. And relations with the US, long a source of friction, were improving -- even as they became less important to the region's success. Today the picture looks very different. Latin America's economies are grinding to a halt: in 2015, average GDP growth slipped below one percent. Yet on one count at least, the lands south of the Rio Grande are faring better than ever: Latin Americans are denouncing corruption as never before. Several factors explain this change in attitude. First, the economic growth of the last 15 years has created a large middle class with high expectations. Second, the region has grown more democratic. Foreigners have also played a role. Together, all these forces have created a combustible mix, and when cases of graft have come to light in recent years, they have sparked major scandals in one country after another.
以下是书评
16. Title: Political and Legal: Theorizing the Responsibility to Protect

Authors: Ikenberry, G John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Political and Legal: Theorizing the Responsibility to Protect” by RAMESH THAKUR and WILLIAM MALEY.
17. Title: Big Ben

Authors: Posen, Adam S.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Courage to Act: A Memoir of a Crisis and Its Aftermath” by Ben S. Bernanke.
18. Title: The European Disunion

Authors: Woods, Ngaire

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Politics of Everyday Europe: Constructing Authority in the European Union” by Ben S. Bernanke.
19. Title: Political and Legal: The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire

Authors: Ikenberry, G John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Political and Legal The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire” by SUSAN PEDERSEN.
20. Title: Political and Legal: War, States, and Contention: A Comparative Historical Study

Authors: Ikenberry, G John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “War, States, and Contention: A Comparative Historical Study” by SIDNEY TARROW.
21. Title: Political and Legal: Emotional Diplomacy: Official Emotion on the International Stage

Authors: Ikenberry, G John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Emotional Diplomacy: Official Emotion on the International Stage” by TODD H. HALL.
22. Title: Political and Legal: The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

Authors: Ikenberry, G John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power” by PATRICK PORTER.
23. Title: Economic, Social, and Environmental: The Great Surge: The Ascent of the Developing World

Authors: Cooper, Richard N.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Great Surge: The Ascent of the Developing World” by STEVEN RADELET.
24. Title: Economic, Social, and Environmental: Catching Capital: The Ethics of Tax Competition

Authors: Cooper, Richard N.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Catching Capital: The Ethics of Tax Competition” by Peter Dietsch, and “The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens” by Gabriel Zucman.
25. Title: Economic, Social, and Environmental: Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception

Authors: Cooper, Richard N.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception” by GEORGE A. AKERLOF AND ROBERT J. SHILLER.
26. Title: Economic, Social, and Environmental: TTIP: The Truth About the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

Authors: Cooper, Richard N.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “TTIP: The Truth About the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership” by FERDI DE VILLE AND GABRIEL SILES-BRÜGGE.
27. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: Beyond the Band of Brothers: The U.S. Military and the Myth That Women Can't Fight

Authors: Freedman, Lawrence D.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Military, Scientific, and Technological Beyond the Band of Brothers: The U.S. Military and the Myth That Women Can't Fight” by MEGAN MACKENZIE.
28. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge

Authors: Freedman, Lawrence D.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge” by PAUL A. RAHE.
29. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: The Dictator's Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes

Authors: Freedman, Lawrence D.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Dictator's Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes” by CAITLIN TALMADGE.
30. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: Hirohito's War: The Pacific War, 1941-1945

Authors: Freedman, Lawrence D.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Hirohito's War: The Pacific War, 1941-1945” by FRANCIS PIKE.
31. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: Hattin

Authors: Freedman, Lawrence D.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Hattin” by JOHN FRANCE.
32. Title: Military, Scientific, and Technological: Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir

Authors: Cohen, Eliot A.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir” by JOHN R. GALVIN.
33. Title: The United States: Katrina: After the Flood

Authors: Mead, Walter Russell

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Katrina: After the Flood” by GARY RIVLIN.
34. Title: The United States: Medicare and Medicaid at 50: America's Entitlement Programs in the Age of Affordable Care

Authors: Mead, Walter Russell

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Medicare and Medicaid at 50: America's Entitlement Programs in the Age of Affordable Care” by ALAN B. COHEN, DAVID C. COLBY, KEITH A. WAILOO, AND JULIAN E. ZELIZER.
35. Title: The United States: The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle

Authors: Mead, Walter Russell

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle” by LILLIAN FADERMAN.
36. Title: The United States: Between the World and Me

Authors: Mead, Walter Russell

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Between the World and Me” by TA-NEHISI COATES.
37. Title: The United States: By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission

Authors: Mead, Walter Russell

Abstract: The article reviews the book “By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission” by CHARLES MURRAY.
38. Title: Western Europe: The EU's Human Rights Dialogue With China: Quiet Diplomacy and Its Limits

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Western Europe The EU's Human Rights Dialogue With China: Quiet Diplomacy and Its Limits” by KATRIN KINZELBACH.
39. Title: Western Europe: Western Europe: New Old World: An Indian Journalist Discovers the Changing Face of Europe

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “New Old World: An Indian Journalist Discovers the Changing Face of Europe” by PALLAVI AIYAR.
40. Title: Western Europe: World Without End: Spain, Philip II, and the First Global Empire

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “World Without End: Spain, Philip II, and the First Global Empire” by HUGH THOMAS.
41. Title: Western Europe: We Love Death as You Love Life: Britain's Suburban Terrorists

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “We Love Death as You Love Life: Britain's Suburban Terrorists” by RAFFAELLO PANTUCCI.
42. Title: Western Europe: Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Das Reboot: How German Soccer Reinvented Itself and Conquered the World” by RAPHAEL HONIGSTEIN.
43. Title: Western Europe: Democratic Politics in a European Union Under Stress

Authors: Moravcsik, Andrew

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Democratic Politics in a European Union Under Stress” by OLAF CRAMME and SARA B. HOBOLT.
44. Title: Western Hemisphere: Strangers on Familiar Soil: Rediscovering the Chile-California Connection

Authors: Feinberg, Richard

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Western Hemisphere Strangers on Familiar Soil: Rediscovering the Chile-California Connection” by EDWARD DALLAM MELILLO.
45. Title: Western Hemisphere: Cuban Studies

Authors: Feinberg, Richard

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Cuban Studies, vol. 43”.
46. Title: Western Hemisphere: Colombia's Political Economy at the Outset of the Twenty-first Century: From Uribe to Santos and Beyond

Authors: Feinberg, Richard

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Colombia's Political Economy at the Outset of the Twenty-first Century: From Uribe to Santos and Beyond” by BRUCE M. BAGLEY AND JONATHAN D. ROSEN.
47. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine” by SERHII PLOKHY.
48. Title: Western Hemisphere: Homeland Security as a Theory of Action: The Impact on U.S./Mexico Border Management

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Homeland Security as a Theory of Action: The Impact on U.S./Mexico Border Management” by ALAN D. BERSIN and MICHAEL D. HUSTON.
49. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: Gangs of Russia: From the Streets to the Corridors of Power

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Gangs of Russia: From the Streets to the Corridors of Power” by SVETLANA STEPHENSON.
50. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: Russia and the New World Disorder

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Russia and the New World Disorder” by BOBO LO.
51. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: Near and Distant Neighbors: A New History of Soviet Intelligence

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Near and Distant Neighbors: A New History of Soviet Intelligence” by JONATHAN HASLAM.
52. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: The Maisky Diaries: Red Ambassador to the Court of St. James's, 1932-1943

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Maisky Diaries: Red Ambassador to the Court of St. James's, 1932-1943” by GABRIEL GORODETSKY.
53. Title: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Republics: Open Wounds: Armenians, Turks, and a Century of Genocide

Authors: Legvold, Robert

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Open Wounds: Armenians, Turks, and a Century of Genocide” by VICKEN CHETERIAN.
54. Title: Middle East: Captive Society: The Basij Militia and Social Control in Iran

Authors: Waterbury, John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Captive Society: The Basij Militia and Social Control in Iran” by SAEID GOLKAR.
55. Title: Middle East: After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East

Authors: Waterbury, John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East” by BRIAN T. EDWARDS.
56. Title: Middle East: Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know

Authors: Waterbury, John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know” by DANIEL BYMAN.
57. Title: Middle East: Middle East: Desert Diplomat: Inside Saudi Arabia Following 9/11

Authors: Waterbury, John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Desert Diplomat: Inside Saudi Arabia Following 9/11” by ROBERT W. JORDAN with STEVE FIFFER.
58. Title: Middle East: Middle East: Islamic State: The Digital Caliphate

Authors: Waterbury, John

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Islamic State: The Digital Caliphate” by ABDEL BARI ATWAN.
59. Title: Asia and Pacific: The Invitation-Only Zone: The True Story of North Korea's Abduction Project

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Invitation-Only Zone: The True Story of North Korea's Abduction Project” by ROBERT S. BOYNTON.
60. Title: Asia and Pacific: Asia and Pacific: The China Boom: Why China Will Not Rule the World

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The China Boom: Why China Will Not Rule the World” by HO-FUNG HUNG.
61. Title: Asia and Pacific: Blood, Dreams, and Gold: The Changing Face of Burma

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Blood, Dreams, and Gold: The Changing Face of Burma” by RICHARD COCKETT.
62. Title: Asia and Pacific: Asia and Pacific: Karachi: Ordered Disorder and the Struggle for the City

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Karachi: Ordered Disorder and the Struggle for the City” by LAURENT GAYER.
63. Title: Asia and Pacific: Deng Xiaoping's Long War: The Military Conflict Between China and Vietnam, 1979-1991

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Deng Xiaoping's Long War: The Military Conflict Between China and Vietnam, 1979-1991” by XIAOMING ZHANG.
64. Title: Asia and Pacific: The Barefoot Lawyer: A Blind Man's Fight for Justice and Freedom in China

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “The Barefoot Lawyer: A Blind Man's Fight for Justice and Freedom in China” by CHEN GUANGCHENG.
65. Title: Africa: Bad News: Last Journalists in a Dictatorship

Authors: van de Walle, Nicolas

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Africa Bad News: Last Journalists in a Dictatorship” by ANJAN SUNDARAM.
66. Title: Asia and Pacific: Berkshire Dictionary of Chinese Biography

Authors: Nathan, Andrew J.

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Berkshire Dictionary of Chinese Biography, vol. 4” by KERRY BROWN.
67. Title: Africa: Electoral Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: Causes and Consequences

Authors: van de Walle, Nicolas

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Electoral Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: Causes and Consequences” by STEPHANIE M. BURCHARD.
68. Title: Africa: Made in Africa: Industrial Policy in Ethiopia

Authors: van de Walle, Nicolas

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Made in Africa: Industrial Policy in Ethiopia” by ARKEBE OQUBAY.
69. Title: Africa: Nigeria: A New History of a Turbulent Century

Authors: van de Walle, Nicolas

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Nigeria: A New History of a Turbulent Century” by RICHARD BOURNE.
70. Title: Africa: Making Sense of the Central African Republic

Authors: van de Walle, Nicolas

Abstract: The article reviews the book “Making Sense of the Central African Republic” by TATIANA CARAYANNIS and LOUISA LOMBARD.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page