Focus: Why would Americans put the famous poem by Francis Scott Key to British music? You must have at least five (5 sentences) and defend or prove your point of view. Student Objectives



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7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 85—Star Spangled Banner and New Orleans

January 12, 2015
Focus: Why would Americans put the famous poem by Francis Scott Key to British music? You must have at least five (5 sentences) and defend or PROVE your point of view.

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Student Objectives:

1. I will recognize that Francis Scott Key’s Star Spangled Banner is combined with the British drinking song “To Anacreon in Heaven.”

2. I will recognize Andrew Jackson as the hero of the Battle of New Orleans.

3. I will identify the Treaty of Ghent as the treaty that ended the war.


Homework:

-Chapter 8 Test Wednesday 1/14


Handouts:

none
I. Fort McHenry

A. Star Spangled Banner

II. Battle of New Orleans

III. Hartford Convention

IV. Treaty of Ghent


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Fort McHenry Baltimore Francis Scott Key Star Spangled Banner

Andrew Jackson Jean Lafitte New Orleans Treaty of Ghent Hartford Convention
By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Who was the hero at the Battle of New Orleans?



What fort was attacked in Baltimore that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the Star Spangled Banner? Who won the battle?

Why was the Battle of New Orleans “unnecessary?”


Notes

Class 85—Star Spangled Banner and New Orleans

January 12, 2015

Star-Spangled Banner:



  • Written by Francis Scott Key after witnessing British attack on For McHenry-U.S. wins battle

  • 1931-officially becomes National Anthem

Battle of New Orleans:



  • Unnecessary-war ended 2 weeks earlier-news travels slow

  • Andrew Jackson becomes national hero for defense of city and defeating the British

    • Jackson has a rag-tag army called the “dirty shirts” made up of “half alligator/half horse” men

    • Jean Lafitte-Pirate that helps Jackson defend the city

Treaty of Ghent:



  • Nothing gotten or gained-nothing changes

  • American perceptions:

Hartford Convention: New England states meeting



  • Speculation-secession and negotiation of separate peace

  • States take care of own defense

  • 3/5 compromise

  • Presidents should be limited to one term and not from same state

7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 86—Tecumseh’s Curse or Zero Factor

January 13, 2015

Focus: Do you believe in curses? What are some famous curses that you know or have heard about? Do you think these are legitimate or just something made-up? Why or why not?

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Student Objectives:

1. I will identify whether or not Tecumseh’s curse is a reality or myth.

2. I will analyze the map of the Electoral College in order to analyze the legitimacy of Tecumseh’s curse
Homework:

-Chapter 8 Test Wednesday 1/14


Handouts:

none
I. Tecumseh’s Curse (Zero Factor)


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Tecumseh Zero Factor William Henry Harrison Abraham Lincoln

Andrew Garfield William McKinley Warren G. Harding FDR JFK

Ronald Reagan


By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Why do you think the Zero Factor is real or fake? Explain.

Notes

Class 86—Tecumseh’s Curse or Zero Factor

January 13, 2015
Tecumseh’s curse is the zero factor-presidents elected in a year ending in zero die while in office
Elected 1840: William Henry Harrison-dies of pneumonia 31 days after taking oath of office
Elected 1860: Abraham Lincoln is assassinated
Elected 1880: James Garfield is assassinated
Elected 1900: William McKinley is assassinated
Elected 1920: Warren G. Harding dies of stroke
Elected 1940: FDR dies of cerebral hemorrhage
Elected 1960: JFK assassinated
Elected 1980: Ronald Reagan shot, does not die
Elected 2000: George W. Bush-nothing

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7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 87—Test

January 14, 2015



Homework:

-Read and outline Chapter 9, Section 1 pgs. 298-301 (due 1/15)

-Read and outline Chapter 9, Section 2 pgs. 302-305 (due 1/16)

-Chapter 9.1 and 9.2 Test Thursday 1/22


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7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 88— Foreign Policy in the “Era of Good Feelings”

January 15, 2015

Focus: Do you feel President Monroe made the right decision when he declared his Doctrine? Why or why not? How did his Doctrine affect the U.S.? Mexico? The rest of Latin America?

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Student Objectives:

1. I will identify U.S. foreign policy during the “Era of Good Feeling” by analyzing the following:



  • Rush-Bagot Agreement

  • Convention of 1818

  • Adams-Onis Treaty

  • Monroe Doctrine


Homework:

-Read and outline Chapter 9, Section 2 pgs. 302-305 (due 1/16)

-Chapter 9.1 and 9.2 Test Thursday 1/22
Handouts:

none
I. Era of Good Feelings

A. James Monroe

B. Foreign Policy


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

James Monroe Rush-Bagot Agreement Convention of 1818 Adams-Onis Treaty

Monroe Doctrine Seminoles Andrew Jackson Seminole War
By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

How did the U.S. acquire Florida?

What was one of the first arms limitations agreements?

How did Andrew Jackson over-step his authority in Florida?

Notes

Class 88— Foreign Policy in the “Era of Good Feelings”

January 15, 2015
Rush-Bagot Agreement:


  • Limited naval power on the Great Lakes for U.S. and British Canada

    • Naval disarmament-earliest example of arms limitations

    • In effect until WWII


Convention of 1818:

  • Fishing rights off coast of Canada

  • Boundary of LA Purchase set at 49 degree latitude

  • Joint occupation of Oregon Territory

What were some issues the people in the South faced with Florida?



  • Creeks and Seminoles raided Georgia

  • Enslaved African Americans were finding freedom there

  • The African American fort and settlement on the banks of the Apalachicola- General Andrew Jackson will sail up to the fort and destroy it. Only a few years later he will lead 3,000 troops into Florida. Spain could not risk the conflict because it was busy fighting rebels in its other colonies in Latin America.


First Seminole War:

    • Jackson really over steps his power here

      • Executes two British subjects

      • Evicts entire Spanish government from Pensacola

      • Hanged two chiefs captured by deception

      • “Beware how you give fatal sanction, in this infant period of our republic, scarcely yet two score years old, to military insubordination. Remember that Greece had her Alexander, Rome her Caesar, England her Cromwell, France her Bonaparte, and that if we would escape the rock on which they split, we must avoid their errors.”-Henry Clay…Jackson never forgives Clay.


Adams-Onis Treaty:

  • Spain and U.S. agreement

  • the U.S. purchased Florida for 5 million bucks


Monroe Doctrine:

  • U.S. not interfere in affairs of European nations

  • U.S. would not interfere with European colonies that already existed in North and South America

  • Western Hemisphere off limits to future colonization

  • Any attempt at colonization in Western Hemisphere is hostile act

  • Latin America relied more on British navy than Monroe Doctrine for strategic security

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7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 89— Erie Canal and American System

January 16, 2015



Focus: What is the difference between nationalism and sectionalism? If there are still sectional differences, can it truly be called the “Era of Good Feelings?” Why or why not?

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Student Objectives:

1. I will identify and analyze the concepts of nationalism and sectionalism during the “Era of Good Feelings.”

2. I will identify the political, economical, and sectional importance of the Erie Canal.

3. I will identify the political, economical, and sectional importance of Henry Clay’s American System.


Homework:

-Chapter 9.1 and 9.2 Test Thursday 1/22


Handouts:

none
I. Nationalism vs. Sectionalism

II. Erie Canal

III. American System


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Nationalism Sectionalism Erie Canal DeWitt Clinton New York

American System Henry Clay Tariff McCulloch v. Maryland

Gibbon v. Ogden


By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Who created the American System?

Why was the South against the American System?

What did the Erie Canal do for New York?

What was the Supreme Court’s ruling in McCulloch v. Maryland? Gibbon v. Ogden?

Notes

Class 89— Erie Canal and American System

January 16, 2015
Early Roads:


  • Example: Cumberland Road

  • Not easiest/fastest way to travel


Erie Canal:

  • DeWitt Clinton

    • “Clinton’s big ditch”

  • makes New York, state and city, the linchpins of the American Economy for nearly a century

  • compressed distance and time in ways that had previously seemed impossible because of its efficiency

  • The Erie Canal would run 363 miles. The canal was 40 feet wide and four feet deep. It would later be enlarged to 70 ft wide and 7 ft deep.

  • Some dangers/hardships

    • Low bridges

    • Traffic jam-locks

    • Freezes

What does the Erie Canal mean politically, economically, and in terms of sectionalism?



  • Within a few years, the canal was carrying $15 million worth of goods annually, twice as much as floated down the Mississippi to New Orleans.

    • Politically-New York becomes powerful state-money = power

    • Economically-New York becomes financial center of U.S.

    • Sectionalism-Mid West shipping goods east rather than south


American System:

  • Henry Clay

  • Synthesis of commerce, agriculture, and industry

    • High tariff to protect U.S. manufacturing in the North

    • Internal improvements

    • North would buy agricultural goods from South and West

  • Need BUS


Opposition to the American System:

  • Thomas Hart Benton

  • Factories are not virtuous

  • Tariffs, banks, and internal improvements = privilege for few at expense of others

  • South found it easier to transport cotton along their rivers-don’t need internal improvements

  • Tariff raised the price of textiles and thus diminished the demand for southern cotton-also increased the cost of maintaining slaves-tariff did not serve slave holding interests


McCulloch v. Maryland:

    • states had no right to interfere with federal institutions-The bank of the U.S. is thus constitutional

    • John Marshall Federalist

      • loose interpretation just like Hamilton

      • Constitution received its power from the people and not the states

      • States have no authority over the BUS

Gibbon v. Ogden:

    • federal government regulates interstate commerce


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