Focus: List two powers that only belong to the national government. List two powers that only belong to the states. List two powers that are shared by both the states and national government. Student Objectives



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7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 57—The Constitution

November 17, 2014
Focus: List two powers that only belong to the national government. List two powers that only belong to the states. List two powers that are shared by both the states and national government.

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Student Objectives:

1. I will demonstrate an understanding of why the Founding Fathers created a government that allowed for:



  • Separation of Powers

  • Federalism

  • Checks and Balances

  • An Electoral College


Homework:

-Read and outline Chapter 5, Section 4 pgs. 170-173 (due 11/18)

-Chapter 5 Test Wednesday 11/19

-Current Events due 11/24

-Preamble Quiz Monday 11/24
Handouts:

none
I. Democracy and Republic

A. Definitions

II. Checks and Balances



  1. Legislative Branch

1. Congress

B. Judicial Branch

1. Supreme Court

C. Executive Branch

1. President

III. Electoral College


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Democracy Republic Bill Supreme Court Judicial Branch

Legislative Branch Executive Branch Bill Electoral College Federalism

By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Who has the power to veto a bill?

What is the job of the Supreme Court?

Why did the Founding Fathers create separation of powers?

How is the President chosen?

Notes

Class 57—The Constitution

November 17, 2014

Popular Sovereignty-political authority belongs to the people
Republic- government in which citizens rule themselves through elected representatives
Federalism-sharing of power between the central government and the states
Legislative Branch-Congress-proposing and passing bills (laws)
Executive Branch-President-makes sure the laws are carried out
Judicial Branch-Supreme Court-interpreting laws
Checks and Balances-keeps any branch from becoming too powerful
Electoral College-elects the President and Vice-President of the U.S.
Veto-President rejects a bill
Bill-law
Constitution Day-September 17, 1787

____________________________________

7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 58— Ratifying the Constitution

November 18, 2014


Focus: When is Constitution day? Pretend you are either James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, or John Jay. Write a brief essay (8 sentences) that you will publish in the Federalist Papers defending the Constitution and why you feel it should be ratified.

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Student Objectives:

1. I will recognize the difference between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.

2. I will recognize some of my basic rights as outlined in the Bill of Rights.

3. I will demonstrate an understanding of the process to amend the Constitution.


Homework:

-Chapter 5 Test Wednesday 11/19

-Current Events due 11/24

-Preamble Quiz Monday 11/24
Handouts:

None
I. Ratification

A. Federalists

B. Anti-Federalists

II. Bill of Rights

III. Amending the Constitution


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Federalists Anti-Federalists Bill of Rights Amendments


By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Who wanted a Bill of Rights?

What did the Anti-Federalists fear?

How is the Constitution Amended?

How many total Amendments are there?
Federalist Papers, Number 10

“The inference to which we are brought is, that the causes of faction cannot be removed; and the relief is only to be sought in the means of controlling its effects….Extend the sphere, and you take in a greater variety of parties and interests; you make it less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens; or if such a common motive exists, it will be more difficult for all who feel it to discover their own strength, and to act in unison with each other. Besides other impediments, it may be remarked, that where there is a consciousness of unjust or dishonourable purposes, communication is always checked by distrust, in proportion to the number whose concurrences is necessary.”

-PUBLIUS (James Madison)

Federalist Papers, Number 51

In order to lay a due foundation for that separate and distinct exercise of the different powers of government, which to a certain extent is admitted on all hands to be essential to the preservation of liberty, it is evident that each department should have a will of its own; and consequently should be so constituted that the members of each should have as little agency as possible in the appointment of the members of the others. Were this principle rigorously adhered to, it would require that all the appointments for the supreme executive, legislative, and judiciary magistracies should be drawn from the same fountain of authority, the people, through channels having no communication whatever with one another.
-PUBLIUS (James Madison)
To the Citizens of the State of New-York

“But if, on the other hand, this form of government contains principles that will lead to the subversion of liberty—if it lends to establish a despotism, or, what is worse, a tyrannic aristocracy; then, if you adopt it, this only remaining assylum for liberty will be shut up, and posterity will execrate your memory….This government is to possess absolute and uncontroulable power, legislative, executive, and judicial, with respect to every object to which it extend, for by the last clause of the section 8th, article 1st, it is declared ‘that the Congress shall have the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this constitution, in the government of the United States; or in any department of office thereof.’”

-BRUTUS (?)

Notes

Class 58— Ratifying the Constitution

November 18, 2014

Federalists:


  • Strong national government

  • Wanted the Constitution to be ratified

  • Authors of the Federalist Papers

    • Essays supporting the Constitution

      • Written by

        • James Madison

        • John Jay

        • Alexander Hamilton


Anti-Federalists:

  • Felt the new government would be too strong

  • Wanted a Bill of Rights

  • Favored more power to the states


Bill of Rights:

  • First 10 Amendments

There are 27 Amendments


Amending the Constitution:

  • 2/3 in the House of Representatives

  • 2/3 in the Senate

  • ¾ of the States

____________________________________

7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 59— Test

November 19, 2014


Homework:

-Current Events due 11/24

-Preamble Quiz Monday 11/24



-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 1 pgs. 234-237 (due 11/20)

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 2 pgs. 238-242 (due 11/21)

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3 pgs. 243-247-stop @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/2)

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3, pgs 247-249-start @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/3)


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 4 pgs. 250-253 (due 12/4)

-Chapter 7 Test Friday 12/5


____________________________________

7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 60— Washington’s Inauguration

November 20, 2014
Focus: What is Republican Motherhood? How did it impact society?

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Student Objectives:

1. I will recognize the importance of George Washington’s inauguration.

2. I will identify the members of the first cabinet.

3. I will analyze the idea of Republican motherhood.


Homework:

-Current Events due 11/24

-Preamble Quiz Monday 11/24

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 2 pgs. 238-242 (due 11/21)

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3 pgs. 243-247-stop @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/2)

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3, pgs 247-249-start @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/4)


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 4 pgs. 250-253 (due 12/4)

-Chapter 7 Test Friday 12/5


Handouts:

None
I. Washington’s Inauguration



  1. “So help me God.”

II. Washington’s Cabinet

Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

New York City April 30, 1789 Robert R. Livingston “So help me God.”

Thomas Jefferson Alexander Hamilton Henry Knox Samuel Osgood Edmund Randolph

Republican Motherhood


By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

What phrase did George Washington utter at his inauguration that has become a precedent that Presidents still follow today?

Who was the first Secretary of State? Treasury? War? Postmaster General? Attorney General?

When was Washington’s inauguration?

Where was Washington’s inauguration?

Why did Washington pick his cabinet from several different states?
Notes

Class 60— Washington’s Inauguration

November 20, 2014

Washington’s Inauguration:


  • April 30, 1789 in NYC

  • The address follows the outline of the Constitution. But Washingtonadds his own touch. He will say “So help me God” and then kiss the bible. Till this day every President that is inaugurated utters these closing words. Thus, Washington established one of his many precedents.


The first five cabinet positions:

  • Secretary of the Treasury-Alexander Hamilton-NY

  • Secretary of State-Thomas Jefferson-VA

  • Department of war-Henry Knox-MA-profane, outspoken, artilleryman, 300 lbs and missing 2 fingers from a hunting accident, with Washington at Trenton/Princeton

  • Attorney General-Edmund Randolph-VA-second cousin of Jefferson

  • Postmaster general-Samuel Osgood-MA

John Adams was Washington’s VP


____________________________________

7th Grade Social Studies

Canada, Mexico, & U.S. History from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Class 61— Economic Issues and Party Formation

November 21, 2014
Focus: Alexander Hamilton’s plan for strengthening the U.S. economy received criticism from the south. List and describe two things about Hamilton’s plan that upset the south.

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Student Objectives:

1. I will identify the economic problems facing the nation under the Constitution.

2. I will describe the compromise between Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison over the issue of assumption.

3. I will recognize that the political philosophies of Hamilton and Jefferson during “the Age of Passion” led to the creation of two new political parties:



  • Federalists

  • Republicans


Homework:

-Current Events due 11/24

-Preamble Quiz Monday 11/24

-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3 pgs. 243-247-stop @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/2)


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3, pgs 247-249-start @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 12/4)


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 4 pgs. 250-253 (due 12/4)

-Chapter 7 Test Friday 12/5


Handouts:

None
I. Hamilton’s Plan

A. Assumption

B. Compromise

1. Residency Question

II. Political Parties



  1. Jefferson vs. Hamilton

  1. Democratic Republicans vs. Federalists


Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

Assumption James Madison Alexander Hamilton Thomas Jefferson

Washington, D.C. Potomac River Federalists Democratic-Republicans
By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

What is assumption?

How did Madison, Hamilton, and Jefferson Compromise?

List two differences between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans.

Why did Madison not think assumption was about money?

Notes

Class 61— Economic Issues and Party Formation

November 21, 2014

Hamilton’s Plan:



  • Fund the debt-buy back bonds at full value

  • Assume states’ debts (assumption)

Madison/Jefferson and Hamilton Compromise:



  • Madison/Jefferson support assumption

  • Madison viewed assumption as not being about money but about control, trust, and independence

  • Hamilton supports the capital in the south-becomes Washington, D.C.

  • Who gets the better end of the deal?

    • Hamilton in the short run appears to win, but Madison and Jefferson do win out in the long run as they fear powerful government. DC in the middle of nowhere-nothing gets done. Nobody wants to go there to work

Political parties and their philosophies: Each side sincerely saw the other as traitors to the core principles of the American Revolution






Federalists

Democratic-Republicans

Leader

Alexander Hamilton

Thomas Jefferson

Economic view

Manufacture/Urban

Farming/Rural

Government Power

Strong Federal Gov’t

Small nat’l gov’t

Constitution View

Loose interpretation

Strict interpretation

Foreign Policy

Alliance w/Britain

Alliance w/France

Supporters

Merchants/Manufacturers

Small farmers/wealthy planters/craftworkers

Bank

Pro-Bank

Anti-Bank

Newspapers

The Gazette of the U.S.-John Fenno

National Gazette-Philip Freneau

Party affiliations according to Jefferson



  • Federalists

    • Fomer loyalists, American merchants trading with England, stock speculators and banking officials, federal employees and other office seekers

  • Republicans

    • Entire body of the landholders throughout the U.S. as well as the body of labourers not being landholders

  • Republicans outnumber Federalists roughly 500-1


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