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NOTES


1 This group, consisting of Asian theological students and women in ministry on the East Coast met first in 1985 as AWT (Asian Women Theologians), and over the years added Asian American women to form AAAWTM (Asian and Asian American Women in Theology and Ministry), to evolve into its current nomenclature in 1996 with increased participation of Pacific women and Canadian theological women students and faculty.


2 Parker J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998); Rebecca S, Chopp, Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1995); bell hooks, Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom (New York: Routledge, 1994); Benjamin P. Bowser, Gale S. Auletta, and Terry Jones, Confronting Diversity Issues on Campus (Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1993); Rey Chow, Writing Diaspora: Tactics of Intervention in Contemporary Cultural Studies (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993); and the chapters of “The Dream of a Butterfly” and “Women in the Holocene: Ethnicity, Fantasy, and the Film The Joy Luck Club,” in her Ethics after Idealism: Theory—Culture—Ethnicity—Reading (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998); and Shirley Hune, “Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education,” Papers of Women of Color in the Academy, no. 3 (1998).


3 Fact Book on Theological Education 1997-98 (Pittsburgh: ATS, 1998), 71.


4 Kwok Pui-lan, “The Global Challenge,” in Christianity and Civil Society, ed. Rodney L. Petersen (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1995), 144.


5 Karen J. Warren, “Rewriting the Future: The Feminist Challenge to the Malestream Curriculum,” Feminist Teacher 4:2-3 (1989): 46.


6 hooks, Teaching to Transgress, 29-30.


7 Ibid., 39.


8 Jonnella E. Butler, “Transforming Curriculum: Teaching about Women of Color,” in Multicultural Education, ed. James A. Bank and Cherry A. McGee (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1989), 151.


9 See Kwok Pui-lan, “Feminist Theologies, Asian,” in Dictionary of Feminist Theologies, ed. Letty M. Russell and J. Shannon Clarkson (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996), 100-102.


10 Rita Nakashima Brock and Naomi Southard, “The Other Half of the Basket: Asian American Women and the Search for a Theological Home,” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion 3:2 (1987): 135-50.


11 Rita Nakashima Brock, “Interstitial Integrity: Reflections toward an Asian American Woman’s Theology,” in Introduction to Christian Theology: Contemporary North American Perspectives, ed. Roger A. Badham (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1998), 183-96.


12 Ai Ra Kim, Women Struggling for a New Life: The Role of Religion in the Cultural Passage from Korea to America (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1996); Jung Ha Kim, Bridge-Makers and Cross-Bearers: Korean American Women and the Church (Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1997).


13 Young Mi Angela Pak, “ Faith as an Autobiographical Strategy: Understanding the Lives of Two Korean Christian Immigrant Women,” Journal of Asian and Asian American Theology 2:1 (1997): 37-50; Naomi P. F. Southard, “Recovery and Recovered Images: Spiritual Resources for Asian American Women,” in Feminist Theology from the Third World, ed. Ursula King (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994), 378-89.


14 Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng, “Inclusive Language in Asian North American Churches: Non-Issue or Null Curriculum?” Journal of Asian and Asian American Theology 2:1 (1997): 21-36, and her essay on “The Asian North American Community at Worship: Issues of Indigenization and Contextualization,” in People on the Way: Asian North Americans Discovering Christ, Culture and Community, ed. David Ng (Valley Forge, PA: Judson Press, 1996), 147-75.


15 For the notion of “ascribed authority” and “achieved authority” and a helpful discussion of both, see “Confucius and John Dewey” by Robert J. Radcliffe in Religious Education 84: 2 (Spring 1989): 215-31.


16 Translations of content from the Analects are by Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng. For Confucius as an educator, she has drawn on a number of resources in Chinese, including Lu Xi, Kongzi: the Great Educator (Shenyang, China: Liaoning Education Press, 1987); Loh Qenglie and Jiemu, Kongzi on Education (Beijing, Xinhua Press, 1992); and Liu Shezheng, Kongzi and His Educational Thought (Zhengzhou, China: Henan University Press, 1988).


17 Brazilian educator and adult literacy innovator Paulo Freire first coined this term in his epoch-making Pedagogy of the Oppressed, first available in English in 1970 (New York: Continuum, 1970).


18 Two of the latest resources in feminist pedagogical practice are: The Feminist Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies, ed. G. E. Cohee, E. Haumer, T. D. Kemp, P. M. Krebs, S. A. Lafky, and S. Runzo (New York: Teachers College Press, 1998); and Meeting the Challenge: Innovative Feminist Pedagogies in Action, ed. Maralee Mayberry and Ellen Cronan Rose (New York: Routledge, 1999).


19 First articulated by anthropologist Edward T. Hall in the mid-1970’s, the concept of “contexting” was adapted by Dorothy C. Herberg in her work on multicultural value systems in Frameworks for Cultural and Racial Diveristy: Teaching and Learning for Practitioners (Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press, 1993) to help in understanding the spectra or continuua of cultural values and practices, with “hierarchical,” “family-oriented,” “interdependent,” etc. on the high-context end of the continuum and “egalitarian,” “individual-oriented,” “independent,” etc. on the low-context end of the continuum.


20 The “homemaking” model of religious instruction was presented by Lizabeth Caldwell in Mapping Christian Education, ed. Jack Seymour (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997), as an alternative feminist image to the more rigid, “schooling” image of instruction as usually envisioned. The homemaking model calls for a more flexible, humane, contextual, and “warm” approach to instruction.


21 For an explication of the degree to which students are naturally auditory, visual, or kinesthetic learners, see diagram on page 49 of Linda Verlee Williams’s Teaching For the Two-Sided Mind: A Guide to Right Brain/Left Brain Education (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1983).


22 Howard Gardner’s theory first appeared in Frames of Mind (New York: Basic Books, 1983), and is followed by, among other works, Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice, A Reader (New York: Basic Books, 1993), and supported and interpreted by Thomas Armstrong in Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1994).


23 David A. Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory may be obtained from McBer and Company of Boston. His classic work explaining this four-pole cycle of learning is Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development (Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1984).


24 Valerie Batts, “Modern Racism: New Melody for the Same Old Tunes,” EDS Occasional Papers, no. 2 (1998): 11.


25 Beverly Daniel Tatum, “Talking about Race, Learning about Racism: The Application of Racial Identity Development and Theory in the Classroom,” Harvard Educational Review 62:1 (1992): 1-24.


26 Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde (Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press, 1984), 38.


27 Katie Geneva Cannon, Kate’s Canon: Womanism and the Soul of Black Community (New York: Continuum, 1995), 141.


28 Ibid.


29 Toinette Eugene et al., “Appropriation and Reciprocity in Womanist/Mujerista/

Feminist Work,” in Feminist Theological Ethics: A Reader, ed. Lois K. Daly (Louisville: Westminster, 1994), 88-120.




30 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 61.


31 Joy James, “Reflections on Teaching: Gender, Race, and Class,” in The Feminist Teacher Anthology, 76.


32 Hune, “Asian Pacific American Women,” 21.


33 Kwok Pui-lan, “Diversity Within Us: The Challenge of Community among Asian and Asian-American Women,” In God’s Image 15:1 (1996): 51-53.


34 Aihwa Ong, Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1999).


35 Elaine Kim, “Images of Asians in Anglo-American Literature,” in Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context, ed. Elaine Kim (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1982).


36 Much has been written on Asian North American as the “model minority.” See Stanley Sue and Sumie Okazaki, “Asian-American Educational Achievements: A Phenomenon in Search of an Explanation,” American Psychologist 45:8 (1990); Keith Hiroshi Osajima, “Breaking the Silence: Race and the Educational Experiences of Asian American College Students,” in Readings on Equal Education, vol. 11, ed. Michèle Foster (New York: AMS Press, Inc., 1991); Bob H. Suzuki, “Asian Americans as the ‘Model Minority’: Out Doing Whites? Or Media Hype?” Change, November/December 1989; Hune, “Asian Pacific American Women,” 9-10.


37 Joanne Sanae Yamauchi and Tin-Mala, “Undercurrents, Maelstroms, or the Mainstream? A Profile of Asian Pacific American Female Studies in Higher Education,” in Educating the Majority: Women Challenge Tradition in Higher Education, ed. Carol S. Pearson, Donna L. Shavlik, Judith G. Touchton (New York: American Council on Education, 1989), 70-73.


38 Hune, “Asian Pacific American Women,” 7-8.


39 Rosalind Y. Mau, “Barriers to Higher Education for Asian/Pacific-American Females,” The Urban Review 22: 3 (1990): 191-93. See also, Yamauchi and Tim-Mala, “Undercurrents,” 72.


40 Sumi K. Cho, “Converging Stereotypes in Racialized Sexual Harrassment: Where the Model Minority Meets Suzie Wong,” in Critical Race Feminism: A Reader, ed. Adrien Katherine Wing (New York: New York University Press, 1997), 204-5.


41 Renee E. Tajima, “Lotus Blossoms Don't Bleed: Images of Asian Women,” in Making Waves: An Anthology of Writings by and about Asian American Women, ed. Asian Women United of California (Boston: Beacon, 1989), 309.


42 Rita Nakashima Brock and Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite, Casting Stones: Prostitution and Liberation in Asia and the United States (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996), 1-66.


43 Osajima, “Breaking the Silence,” 124-28.


44 Ibid., 128-29.


45 Gale A. Yee, “The Impact of National Histories on the Politics of Identity,” Journal of Asian and Asian American Theology 2:1 (1997): 108-12.

APPENDICES


1. Selected Bibliography on Asian and Asian North American Women’s Theologies
Abraham, Dulcie, et al., eds. Asian Women Doing Theology: Report from the Singapore Conference, November 20-29, 1987. Hong Kong: Asian Women’s Resource Centre for Culture and Theology (AWRC), 1989.
_____, eds. Faith Renewed: A Report on the First Asian Women’s Consultation on Interfaith Dialogue. Hong Kong: AWRC, n.d.
Antone, Hope S., and Yong Ting Jin, eds. Re-Living Our Faith Today: A Bible Study Resource Book. Hong Kong: World Student Christian Federation, Asia-Pacific Region, 1992.
AWRC, ed. Faith Renewed II: A Report on the Second Asian Women’s Consultation on Interfaith Dialogue, November 1-7, 1991, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Seoul: AWRC, 1995.
Brock, Rita Nakashima. “Interstitial Integrity: Reflections toward an Asian American Woman's Theology.” In Introduction to Christian Theology, ed. Roger Badham, Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1998.
_____. Journeys by Heart: A Christology of Erotic Power. New York: Crossroad, 1988.
_____, and Naomi Southard. “The Other Half of the Basket: Asian American Women and the Search for a Theological Home.” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion 3:2 (1987): 135-50.
_____, and Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite. Casting Stones: Prostitution and Liberation in Asia and the United States. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996.
Chai, Alice Yun. “The Struggle of Asian and Asian American Women toward a Total Liberation: A Korean Methodist Woman’s Vocational Journey.” In Spirituality and Social Responsibility: Vocational Vision of Women in the United Methodist Tradition, ed. Rosemary Skinner Keller. Nashville: Abingdon, 1993.
Cho, Wha Soon. Let the Weak Be Strong: A Woman’s Struggle for Justice. Bloomington: Meyer Stone Books, 1988.
Chung, Hyun Kyung. Struggle to Be the Sun Again: Introducing Asian Women’s Theology. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1990.
EATWOT Women’s Commission, Proceedings, Asian Women’s Consultation, Manila, 21-30 November, 1985. Manila: EATWOT, n.d.
Fabella, Virginia. Beyond Bonding: A Third World Women’s Theological Journey. Manila: EATWOT, 1993.

_____, and Mercy Amba Oduyoye, eds. With Passion and Compassion: Third World Women Doing Theology. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1988.


_____, and Sun Ai Lee Park, eds. We Dare to Dream: Doing Theology as Asian Women. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1989.
Gnanadason, Aruna. No Longer a Secret: The Church and Violence against Women. Geneva: WCC, 1993.
_____, ed. Towards a Theology of Humanhood: Women’s Perspectives. Delhi: All India Council of Christian Women, 1986.
In God's Image. Quarterly journal published by AWRC, address: 79 Lorong Anggor, Taman Shanghai, 58100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Katoppo, Marianne. Compassionate and Free: An Asian Women’s Theology. Geneva: WCC, 1979.
Kim, Ai Ra. Women Struggling for a New Life: The Role of Religion in the Cultural Passage from Korea to America. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1996.
Kim, Jung Ha. Bridge-Makers and Cross-Bearers: Korean American Women and the Church. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1997.
_____. “But Who Do you Say that I Am? (Matt 16:15): A Churched Korean American Woman’s Autobiographical Inquiry.” In Journey at the Margin: Toward an Autobiographical Theology in American-Asian Perspective, ed. Peter C. Phan and Jung Young Lee. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1999.
_____. “The Labor of Compassion: Voices of Churched Korean American Women.” In New Spiritual Homes: Religion and Asian Americans, ed. David K. Yoo. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1999.
_____. “Sources Outside of Europe.” In Spirituality and the Secular Quest, ed. Peter H. Van Ness. New York: Crossroad, 1996.
_____. “A Voice from ‘the Borderlands’: Asian-American Women and the Families.” In Religion, Feminism and the Family, ed. Anne Carr and Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996.
King, Ursula, ed. Feminist Theology from the Third World. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994.
Kinukawa, Hisako. Women and Jesus in Mark: A Japanese Feminist Perspective. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994.

Kwok, Pui-lan. Chinese Women and Christianity, 1860-1927. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1992.


_____. Discovering the Bible in the Non-Biblical World. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1995.
_____. Introducing Asian Feminist Theology, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press. Forthcoming.
_____. ed. “Asian and Asian American Women’s Voices.” Journal of Asian and Asian American Theology 2:1 (1997).
Lee, Oo Chung. In Search for Our Grandmother's Spirituality. Seoul: AWRC, 1994.
_____, et al., eds. Women of Courage: Asian Women Reading the Bible. Seoul: AWRC, 1992.
Lewis, Nantawan Boonprasat. “Reclaiming Liberative Trends: Owning Asian American Women’s History of Struggle.” In Revolution of Spirit, ed. Nantawan Boonprasat Lewis. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 1998.
_____. “Toward an Ethic of Feminist Liberation and Empowerment: A Case Study of Prostitution in Thailand.” In Christian Ethics in Ecumenical Context, ed. Shin Chiba, George R. Hunsberger, and Lester Edwin J. Ruiz. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 1995.
_____. ed. An Ocean with Many Shores: Asian Women Making Connections in Theology and Ministry. Asian Women Theologians, Northeast U.S. Group, n.d.
Lozada, Rebecca, and Alison O’Grady, eds. Creation and Spirituality: Asian Women Expressing Christian Faith through Art. Hong Kong: Christian Conference of Asia, 1995.
Mananzan, Mary John, ed. Essays on Women. rev. ed. Manila: St. Scholastica’s College, 1991.
_____. “Feminist Theology in Asia: A Ten Years’ Overview.” Feminist Theology 10 (1995): 21-32.
_____, ed. Women and Religion. rev. ed. Manila: St. S­­­­­­­­­­­cholastica’s College, 1992.
_____, et al., eds. Women Resisting Violence: Spirituality for Life. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1996.
“Mapping A Pan-Pacific Feminist Theology.” Special issue of Journal of Women and Religion 13 (1995).
Ng, Greer Anne Wenh-In. “Crossing Oceans, Crossing Disciplines: Doing Theology as Asians in Diaspora.” In Ecumenism in Asia: Essays in Honor of Feliciano Carino, ed. K. C. Abraham. Bangalore: Board of Theological Education of the Senate of Serampore College, 1999.
_____. “Toward Wholesome Nurture: Challenges in the Religious Education of Asian North American Female Christians.” Religious Education 91: 2 (1996): 238-54.
_____, ed. Generations Trying to Live Together. Toronto: United Church of Canada, 1995.
Nordquist, Joan, ed. Women of Color: Feminist Theory, A Bibliography. Santa Cruz, CA: Reference and Research Services, 1996.
PAACCE, newsletter of Pacific and Asian American Canadian Christian Education Ministries.
Pacific People, Newsletter of Pacific and Asian American Center for Theology and Strategies, Berkeley, California.
Rebera, Ranjini. A Partnership of Equals: A Resource Guide for Asian Women. Hong Kong: Christian Conference of Asia, 1995.
_____. A Search for Symbols: An Asian Experiment. Manila: Christian Conference of Asia, 1990.
_____, ed. We Cannot Dream Alone: A Story of Women in Development. Geneva: WCC, 1990.
Riyo, Risé, ed. Asian, Woman, and the Body. Cambridge, MA: Asian and Asian American Women in Ministry and Theology, 1994.
Ruether, Rosemary Radford, ed. Women Healing Earth: Third-World Women on Ecology, Feminism, and Religion. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1996.
Russell, Letty, Kwok Pui-lan, Ada María Isasi-Díaz, and Katie Geneva Cannon, eds. Inheriting Our Mothers’ Gardens: Feminist Theology in Third World Perspective. Louisville: Westminster, 1988.
Southard, Naomi P. F. “Recovery and Rediscovered Images: Spiritual Resources for Asian American Women.” In Feminist Theology from the Third World, ed. Ursula King. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994.
Women’s Concerns Unit, Christian Conference of Asia, ed. Reading the Bible as Asian Women. Singapore: Christian Conference of Asia, 1986.
Yang, Seung Ai. “Jesus’ Saying on Divorce: A Korean Perspective.” The Bible Today 35 (January 1997): 49-54.
Yee, Gale A. “The Impact of National Histories on the Politics of Identity.” Journal of Asian and Asian American Theology 2:1 (1997): 108-12.

2. Selected Bibliography on Teaching and Pedagogy


Akamatusu, N. Norma. “The Talking Oppression Blues Including the Experience of Power/Powerlessness in the Teaching of ‘Cultural Sensitivity’.” In Re-Visioning Family Therapy: Race, Culture, and Gender in Clinical Practice, ed. Monica McGoldrick. New York: The Guilford Press, 1998.
Armstrong, Thomas. Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria. VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1994.
Bank, James A., and Cherry A. McGee, eds. Multicultural Education. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1989.
Bowser, Benjamin P., Gale S. Auletta, and Terry Jones, Confronting Diversity Issues on Campus. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1993.
Brookfield, Stephen D. Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1995.
Chopp, Rebecca S. Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1995.
Cohee, Gail E., et al., eds. The Feminist Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies. New York: Teachers College Press, 1998.
Cornwall Collective, The. Your Daughters Shall Prophesy: Feminist Alternatives in Theological Education. New York: Pilgrim, 1980.
Duraisingh, Christopher. “Ministerial Formation for Mission: Implications for Theological Education.” International Review of Mission 81:321 (January 1992): 33-45.
Freire, Paulo. Pedagogy of Hope: Reliving Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York: Continuum, 1994.
Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice, A Reader. New York: Basic Books, 1993.
Harris, Maria. Teaching and the Religious Imagination: An Essay in the Theology of Teaching. San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1987.
Herberg, Dorothy C. Frameworks for Cultural and Racial Diversity: Teaching and Learning for Practitioners. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press, 1993.
hooks, bell. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. New York: Routledge, 1994.
Hune, Shirley. “Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education.” Papers of Women of Color in the Academy, no. 3 (1998).
Jaggar, Alison M., and Susan R. Bordo, eds. Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1989.
Kolb, David A. Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1984.
Kruzich, Jean M., Barbara J. Friesen, and Dorothy Van Soest. “Assessment of Student and Faculty Learning Styles: Research and Application.” Journal of Social Work Education, no. 3 (1986): 22-30.
Kwok Pui-lan. “The Global Challenge.” In Christianity and Civil Society, ed. Rodney L. Petersen. Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 1995.
Lawrence, Gordon. People Types and Tiger Stripes: A Practical Guide to Learning Styles. 3rd ed. Gainsville, FL: Center for Application of Psychological Type, Inc., 1993.
Like, Carmen, and Jennifer Core, eds. Feminisms and Critical Pedagogy. New York: Routledge, 1992.
Matsuoka, Fumitaka. “Pluralism at Home: Globalization within North America.” Theological Education 26 Suppl. (Spring 1990): 35-51.
Mau, Rosalind Y. “Barriers to Higher Education for Asian/Pacific-American Females.” The Urban Review 22: 3 (1990): 183-97.
Mayberry, Maralee, and Ellen Cronan Rose, eds. Meeting the Challenge: Innovative Feminist Pedagogies in Action. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Moore, Mary Elizabeth. Teaching from the Heart. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1991.
Mud Flower Collective, The. God’s Fierce Whimsy: Christian Feminism and Theological Education. New York: Pilgrim, 1985.
Osajima, Keith Hiroshi. “Breaking the Silence: Race and the Educational Experiences of Asian American College Students.” In Readings on Equal Education. Vol. 11, ed. Michèle Foster. New York: AMS Press, Inc., 1991.
Palmer, Parker J. The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998.
Sandler, Bernice R. The Campus Climate Revisited: Chilly for Women Faculty, Administrators, and Graduate Students. Washington, DC: Project on the Status and Education of Women, 1986.
Sternberg, Robert. Thinking Styles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Sue, Stanley, and Sumie Okazaki. “Asian-American Educational Achievements: A Phenomenon in Search of an Explanation.” American Psychologist 45: 8 (1990): 913-20.
Suzuki, Bob H. “Asian Americans as the ‘Model Minority’: Out Doing Whites? Or Media Hype?” Change November/December (1989): 13-19.
Tatum, Beverly Daniel. “Talking about Race, Learning About Racism: The Application of Racial Identity Development Theory in the Classroom.” Harvard Educational Review 62:1 (1992): 1-24.
Thangaraj, M. Thomas. “Theological Education in the United States: A View from the Periphery.” Theological Education 28:2 (1992): 8-20.
Vella, Jane. Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach: The Power of Dialogue in Educating Adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994.
Warren, Karen J. “Rewriting the Future: The Feminist Challenge to the Malestream Curriculum,” Feminist Teacher 4:2-3 (1989): 46-52.
Wheeler G. Barbara, and Edward Farley, eds. Shifting Boundaries: Contextual Approaches to the Structure of Theological Education. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1991.
Williams, Linda Verlee. Teaching for the Two-Sided Mind: A Guide to Right Brain/Left Brain Education. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1983.
Yamauchi, Joanne Sanae, and Tin-Mala. “Undercurrents, Maelstroms, or the Mainstream? A Profile of Asian Pacific American Female Studies in Higher Education.” In Educating the Majority: Women Challenge Tradition in Higher Education, ed. Carol S. Pearson et al. New York: American Council on Education, 1989.
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