Feminist Studies 101/History 173c professor Estelle Freedman Autumn, 2000 History 200-07, 3-4951



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Feminist Studies 101/History 173C Professor Estelle Freedman

Autumn, 2000 History 200-07, 3-4951

M/W 1:15-3:05, rm 200-02 T.A.s: Catherine Bae, Manashita Dass,

www.stanford.edu/class/fs101 Cari Sietstra,


INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST STUDIES


The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of feminist scholarship, which seeks to understand the creation and perpetuation of gender inequalities. After tracing the historical emergence of feminist critiques, the course surveys contemporary feminist issues, particularly work and family, health and sexuality, creativity and politics. Each section draws on historical analysis and pays close attention to the variety of women's experiences. Along with the focus on the U. S., the course attempts to incorporate international perspectives on women and feminism.
No prior course work is required to take FS101, but a sincere commitment to understanding feminism and a willingness to complete all course assignments are essential. Beyond the presumption that gender inequality is unjust, the course takes no single political perspective. A major goal is to train students in analytical skills that will help them think critically about gender in the past, the present, and the future. This course fulfills the Gender Studies GER. It is NOT available pass/no credit. Additional units for public service internships are available by application through the Program in Feminist Studies during any quarter.
Lectures are on Mondays and Wednesdays. Films can be viewed individually at the library or at group showings, TBA. Sections meet for one hour (usually Thursday or Friday). Small groups can meet at any time that all members can regularly attend; if the group cannot meet at any other time, Tuesdays or Fridays 1:15-3:00 are default times.
REQUIRED BOOKS available at the Stanford Bookstore and Meyer Reserve:

Eugenia Delamotte et al., eds., WOMEN IMAGINE CHANGE: A GLOBAL ANTHOLOGY OF WOMEN’S RESISTANCE FROM 600 B.C. TO PRESENT (WIC)

Buchi Emecheta, THE JOYS OF MOTHERHOOD

Virginia Woolf, THREE GUINEAS

FS101 COURSE READER (RDR)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS (See end of syllabus or Web page for due dates and small groups)

1. Attend ALL lectures, and please do not come late.

2. Complete all reading, including required Web-links, and view each required film.

3. Participate in all meetings of your discussion section; submit five required reading /film responses on time. See course web page for guidelines.

4. Submit graded essays on time. Essays, based on a choice of questions given out a week in advance, should integrate readings, films, and discussions. Mid-term paper(s) are 2000-2500 words and due 10/22 and (optional) 11/7. The final exam includes short identifications and an essay of 10-12 pages, or up to 3500 words, due 12/X. The second mid-term is optional for those who receive a grade of B+ or better on the first mid-term.

5. Participate in all 7 small group meetings; submit a 5-page paper evaluating small group sessions (due XXX). Journal keeping, though not required, is highly recommended to help produce this paper. Students must participate in all small group meetings to receive credit for the course.


SECTION AND SMALL GROUP (attendance, on time, participation, and response papers) ACCOUNT FOR 20-25 % OF YOUR FINAL GRADE.

All written work must be printed, double spaced, 12 point font, with one inch margins; all written work must be submitted on the due date, by the time deadline. Late papers will be downgraded a full grade per day and will not be accepted after one day. Extensions and incompletes will not be granted EXCEPT in the case of medical or family emergencies (in these cases, please contact T.A. or instructor as soon as possible).


The course Web Page includes a list of lecture topics with required and recommended Web links. Please let me know of any other Web links that might be recommended during the quarter or in the future.
SUMMARY OF LECTURES, Room 200-02
9/26: INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS FEMINIST STUDIES?
Part I. BEFORE FEMINISM

10/1 ORIGINS STORIES: NATURE AND CULTURE

10/3 GENDER AND POWER CROSS-CULTURALLY
Part II. THE EMERGENCE OF FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE

10/8 ORIGINS OF EUROPEAN FEMINISMS: LIBERAL, SOCIALIST, MATERNALIST/RADICAL



10/10 RACE, GENDER, AND IDENTITY IN "FIRST AND SECOND WAVE" U.S. FEMINISMS
10/15 THE POLITICS OF LOCATION AND TRANSNATIONAL FEMINISMS

10/17 RESISTANCE, ALLIANCES, AND COALITIONS


Part III. CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST ISSUES I: WORK AND FAMILY

10/22 THE FAMILY ECONOMY AND TRADITIONAL WOMEN'S WORK

10/24 INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE TRANSITION TO WAGE LABOR, I
10/29 INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE TRANSITION TO WAGE LABOR, II

10/31 SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES, I


11/5 SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES, II
Part IV. CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST ISSUES II: SEXUALITY AND HEALTH

11/7 WHOSE BODY? HEALTH, FOOD, AND BEAUTY


11/12 REPRODUCTION

11/14 SEXUALITIES


11/19 SEX AND VIOLENCE I: RAPE AND HARASSMENT

11/21 SEX AND VIOLENCE II: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND CHILD ABUSE
Part V. MOVEMENTS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: FEMINIST STRATEGIES

11/26 SPIRITUALITY, LANGUAGE, CREATIVITY

11/28 CREATIVITY, continued
12/3 POLITICS

12/5: EDUCATION AND COURSE SUMMARY


DATES, TOPICS, ASSIGNMENTS Add page numbers

All assignments, including films and WEB links, are required unless marked REC.


9/26: INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS FEMINIST STUDIES?
Muriel Rukeyser, "Myth," COURSE READER (hereafter RDR)

Audre Lorde, "The Masters Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," RDR

(We will discuss these readings in sections later during the quarter)

Begin reading Emecheta, JOYS OF MOTHERHOOD, for first sections next week


Part I. BEFORE FEMINISM
10/1: ORIGINS STORIES: NATURE AND CULTURE

Ruth Hubbard, "The Political Nature of 'Human Nature'," pp. 63-73, RDR

Evelyn Nakano Glenn, “The Social Construction and Institutionalization of Gender and

Race,” pp. 3-13, RDR

Section lists will circulate in class; changes must be made by Wednesday.
10/3: GENDER AND POWER CROSS-CULTURALLY

WIC: Sei Shonagon, 131-133; Buddhist nuns, 41-45; Baba of Karo, 319-321; Canton

resistance, 325-29

Emecheta, THE JOYS OF MOTHERHOOD (complete for section)

RECOMMENDED FILM: “Nu Shu”

RECOMMENDED WEB: (Nu Shu)


First sections meet this week; be sure to complete Emecheta before section.

Small group lists will circulate in class today.


Part II. THE EMERGENCE OF FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE


10/8: ORIGINS OF EUROPEAN FEMINISMS: LIBERAL, SOCIALIST, MATERNALIST/RADICAL

WIC: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 251-255; Olympe de Gouge, 265-67; Huda Sh'arawi, 302-303;

Alexandra Kollontai,258-259

Woolf, THREE GUINEAS, esp. pp. 3-84, 99-117, 143-44 (for section)

RECOMMENDED WEB: Wollstonecraft, Senceca Falls, socialist feminism
10/10: RACE, GENDER, AND IDENTITY IN "FIRST AND SECOND WAVE" U.S. FEMINISMS

WIC: Ida B. Wells, 380-83; Anna Julia Cooper, 429-431; Jo Carillo, 281-83

Estelle Freedman, "Separatism as Strategy," RDR

Combahee River Collective Statement, RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB: Sojourner Truth; Asian American Feminists; Chicana Feminism


RECOMMENDED film: “Some American Feminists”
Small groups begin meeting this week. Please read directions on course web page and the

following short historical documents in RDR:

Pam Allen, "Free Space"

Irene Restikis, "Resistance to CR"

Lynet Uttal, "Nods That Silence"

10/15: THE POLITICS OF LOCATION AND TRANSNATIONAL FEMINISMS

WIC: Taj Al-Saltana, 277-280; Kusunose Kita, 367-370; Qui Jin, 493-495; Domitila

Barrios de la Chungara, 117-120, 420-423;



Rich, "Notes Toward a Politics of Location," RDR

Chandra Mohanty, "Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses," RDR

REQUIRED FILM: “Beyond Beijing;” RECOMMENDED film: "A Veiled Revolution”

RECOMMENDED WEB: Beijing 1995; Global Feminism; Afghan Women [rawa.org]

Topics for mid-term paper distributed in class today; papers due before class 10/22.
10/17: RESISTANCE, ALLIANCES, AND COALITIONS [ebf to do - contact lisa and ben]

WIC: Cheríe Moraga, 449-52

Peggy McIntosh, “White Privilege, Male Privilege,” RDR

Peter Blood, Alan Tuttle, and George Lakey, “Understanding and Fighting Sexism: A Call to

Men,” RDR

Bernice Johnson Reagon, "Coalition Politics" RDR

Audre Lorde, "The Masters Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB PAGES: “How Men Fit In,” Third Wave

Part III. CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST ISSUES I: WORK AND FAMILY
10/22: THE FAMILY ECONOMY AND TRADITIONAL WOMEN'S WORK

WIC: Mary Collier, 134-138; Nannie Stillwell Jackson diary, 323

Om Naeema, "Fisherwoman," RDR

Pat Mainardi, "The Politics of Housework," RDR

Cynthia Enloe, "It Takes More Than Two," RDR

REQUIRED WEB: Valuing Women’s Work

RECOMMENDED WEB: Homemakers Bill of Rights
10/24: INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE TRANSITION TO WAGE LABOR, I

Sonia, "I Never Have Time to Sit Down" RDR ** FIND BETTER DOC?

Miriam Ching Louie, "Immigrant Asian Women," RDR

REQUIRED FILMS: "The Global Assembly Line" and “Sin City”

RECOMMENDED WEB: Equal Pay
Small group and section mid-term assessments are due this week (in section).
10/29: INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE TRANSITION TO WAGE LABOR, II

REQUIRED WEB: Women and Work Data


10/31: SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES, I

WIC: Maria Curter, 139-142

Susan Gal and Gail Kligman, “The Politics of Gender After Socialism,” RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB: Welfare Warriors, Microcredit; Fair Wear, Prison Data


Topics for optional second mid-term distributed in class today, due before class 11/7

11/5: SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES, II

Eva Feder Kittay, “Welfare, Dependency, and a Public Ethic of Care,” RDR
Part IV. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES II: SEXUALITY AND HEALTH
11/7: WHOSE BODY? HEALTH, FOOD, AND BEAUTY

Roberta Galler, "The Myth of the Perfect Body," pp. 165-72, RDR

Carol Munter, "Fat and the Fantasy of Perfection," pp. 225-230, RDR

Nancy Mairs, "Body in Trouble, " pp. 40-64, RDR **edit?

AAWORD, "A Statement on Genital Mutilation," pp. 217-219, RDR

REQUIRED FILMS: “Mirror, Mirror;” “Still Killing Us Softly;” REC FILM: “Slaying the

Dragon”

RECOMMENDED WEB: Women with Disabilities, About Face (browse); Politics of

Women’s Health, Fat?So!
11/12: REPRODUCTION

WIC: Margaret Sanger, 389-392; Angela Davis, 393-97

Karen Schneiderman, "Disabled Women Need Choice, Too," RDR

Rosalind P. Petchesky, “Spiraling Discourses of Reproductive and Sexual Rights: A Post-

Beijing Assessment of International Feminist Politics,” RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB: FAQs, Sterilization Abuse FIND NEW LINKS

RECOMMENDED FILM: “La Operacion”

11/14: SEXUALITIES

WIC: Ann Lister, 46-49; Fatima Mernissi, 82-84; Audre Lorde, 97-101; Carolyn Mobley, 56-57,

Mag Segrest, 152-154

REQUIRED FILM: “Girls Like Us; ” REC FILM: “Choosing Children”

RECOMMENDED WEB: Anna Koedt, “Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm;” “Woman-Identified

Woman”
11/19: SEX AND VIOLENCE I: RAPE AND HARASSMENT


Pauline Bart and Patricia H. O'Brien, "Stopping Rape: Effective Avoidance Strategies"

Alan Johnson, The Gender Knot, 92-97, RDR

Katie Koestner, “The Perfect Rape Victim,” pp. 130-132, RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB: Sexual Assault Links; Real Men

RECOMMENDED FILM: “In Harm’s Way”

11/21: SEX AND VIOLENCE II: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND CHILD ABUSE

WIC: Abigail Abbot Bailey, 232-36

bell hooks, "Violence in Intimate Relationships: A Feminist Perspective" RDR

Joy Harjo, "I Give You Back," *WEB

REQUIRED WEB: Domestic Violence Facts

REQUIRED FILM: “No Longer Silent”

Part V. MOVEMENTS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: FEMINIST STRATEGIES


11/26: SPIRITUALITY, LANGUAGE, CREATIVITY

WIC: Sumangalamata et al, 41-45; Jarena Lee, 177-82; Laura Geller, 59-63; Samman, 84-86

Muriel Rukeyser, "Myth," RDR

Gloria Anzaldúa, "How to Tame a Wild Tongue," RDR

Ursula LeGuin, "On the Mothertongue," RDR

RECOMMENDED WEB: Mary Daly, Lilith; Islamic feminism

11/28: CREATIVITY, continued

WIC, Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, 163-166

Alice Walker, "In Search of Our Mothers Gardens," RDR

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, "Sultana's Dream," RDR

REQUIRED WEB: Art Data, Guerrilla Girls;

RECOMMENDED WEB: Bookstores, In Her Hands

12/3: POLITICS
12/5: EDUCATION AND COURSE SUMMARY

Small group evaluation/course summary papers due at beginning of class today; last sections meet this week.


Take home final exam questions distributed in class today; due in History Department Office by XXX

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SUMMARY OF WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS *SUSANA = redo: dates etc on ff pp.
I. Graded Writing Assignments REVISE DATES - confirm lengths agree

Date


Topics distributed for mid-term paper (5-6 pp)

Paper due BEFORE CLASS BEGINS

Topics distributed for optional second mid-term paper (5-6 pp)

Paper due BEFORE CLASS BEGINS

Final paper topics distributed (10-12 pages)

Final papers due in History Dept. office by xx p.m.


II. Ungraded writing assignments (must be handed in on time for credit):


Five one-two page responses to required readings/films due to section leader before section; see guidelines on course web page. Students will sign up for due weeks in section.
B. A five-page small group summary/evaluation paper, due BEFORE LAST LECTURE (12/5), based on ongoing journal and short thought pieces for small groups. FORMAT WILL BE DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS.
Some tips for graded papers:

We are interested in how well you comprehend the issues raised in readings, lectures, and films and in your abilities to express your views clearly and persuasively. Papers will be evaluated on clarity of argument, use of evidence, and stylistic presentation. At the beginning of a paper, state your thesis or argument in response to the question or topic; then structure the paper clearly to establish your points; use topic sentences to show where the paper is going; avoid overgeneralization (re: historical periods, cultures, classes, races, etc.; look for patterns but be aware of distinctions). Some common pitfalls: women are victims; nothing changes; my experience (personal, family, group) is the most relevant; my experience (personal, family, group) is not relevant (i.e., "I can't speak because I'm not the most oppressed").

FILM SCHEDULE: REVISE DATES, CONFIRM PLACE

Films shown in 200-02 on unless otherwise noted (Bold = required viewing)



Screen Title Length

(Nu Shu,1999) 55 min (view outside class by 1/17)

(Some American Feminists, )

Beyond Beijing (1996) 60 min

Sin City (1992) 29 min

Global Assembly Line (1988) 58 min

(Through Chinese Women’s Eyes, 1997) 53 min

Mirror, Mirror (1990) 17 min (in class)

(Slaying the Dragon) 60 min (view outside class)

Girls Like Us (1997) 60 min (view outside class by 2/21)

(Choosing Children) 45 min (view outside class)

(La Operación) 40 min (view outside class)

No Longer Silent (1986) 57 min

(In Harm’s Way) 27 min


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SMALL GROUPS: Initial Instructions REVISE DATES


Small groups are intended to encourage peer discussion of the issues raised by the class. They are based on the belief that exploring both common and differing personal responses to the ideas raised in class can broaden our base of knowledge and break down resistance to learning new ideas. Students will receive a handout on how to run small groups (also available on the course WEB page)

Groups of no more than five students each (randomly assigned) will meet weekly at least eight times during the quarter. Each session should last approximately one and a half hours (minimum one hour, maximum two hours). Since we do not have lectures on Tuesdays at 1:15, this is one suggested time for meeting; in the past some groups have met after class, or in the evenings or on weekends.


Group lists will circulate at the third class meeting (10/3) and members will meet briefly to identify themselves and set up an initial meeting time and place. Please coordinate schedules and find a permanent, regular meeting time when ALL members can attend. From past experience, it is important not to shift meeting times. The most successful groups included members who were committed to the time and to being ON TIME for each meeting. It is extremely disrespectful to other students to come late to a small group meeting. You can meet in a dorm room or reserved lounge area, an unused classroom, or off campus. Past experience suggests that it is not a good idea to meet in a public place like the Coffee House or a restaurant, or a well-travelled lounge.
If there are initial scheduling problems in a group, changes can be made ONLY BEFORE OCTOBER 10. Please notify the instructors about problems; we will try to accommodate any shifts before the next class. Please do not ask to change groups in order to be in a group with a friend or house mate. Student feedback has suggested that it is better not to know other group members well already.
The first meeting should take place by October 14 and the last scheduled meeting by December 3. To receive credit for this course you must participate in at least seven small group meetings. In case of medical or family emergency, please contact a group member and report your absence to your T.A. Please inform the teaching staff if any group is having a problem about attendance or scheduling.


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