Federalism: Federal, State, and Local Governments Content Review



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ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 6



Federalism: Federal, State, and Local Governments

Content Review












SS.7.C.2.3 Experience the responsibilities of citizens at the local, state, or federal levels.

SS.7.C.2.12 Develop a plan to resolve a state or local problem by researching public policy alternatives, identifying appropriate government agencies to address the issue, and determining a course of action. SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments. (See Legislative Branch Content Review for more information) SS.7.C.3.13 Compare the constitutions of the United States and Florida. SS.7.C.3.14 Differentiate between local, state, and federal governments' obligations and services.

Vocabulary

City Charter

Concurrent powers

County


County Seat

Federal system

Governor

Line-item veto

Mayor

Referendum



Reserved powers

Special session

Statute

Home rule



Ordinance

Rural


Suburb

Town


Town meeting

Township


Village

Urban


Content Focus Terms

Constitution

Florida Constitution

Supremacy Clause

Florida Declaration of Rights

Tenth Amendment

School Board

State Legislators

Florida State Representatives

Florida State Senators

Preamble


SS.7.C.3.13

Florida Declaration of Rights

  • Freedom of Religion

  • Freedom of Speech and the Press

  • Freedom of Assembly

  • The right to bear arms

  • The right to due process

  • The right to be secure against unreasonable searches and seizures

  • No ex post facto laws

  • No laws reducing contract obligations

  • A guarantee of habeas corpus, except in times of invasion or rebellion

  • Protection against double jeopardy

  • One cannot be forced testify against oneself (no self-incrimination)

  • No cruel and unusual punishment

  • The right to bail

  • The right to an attorney

  • The right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury

SS.7.C.3.4

BRANCH

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FLORIDA STATE GOVERNMENT

Legislative Branch

Congress

U.S. Senate

U.S. House of Representatives


Florida State Legislature

Florida Senate

Florida House of Representatives


Executive Branch

President

Vice President

Appointed Cabinet Members


Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Elected Cabinet members (Attorney General, etc.)


Judicial Branch

U.S. Supreme Court

U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

U.S. District Court


Florida Supreme Court

Florida District Court pf Appeal

Florida Circuit Courts

Florida County Courts






SS.7.C.3.4

EXCLUSIVE FEDERAL POWERS

CONCURRENT (SHARED) POWERS

RESERVED STATE POWERS

Given by the 10th Amendment



Coin and print money & regulate its value

Tax

Regulate elections

Regulate interstate commerce

Borrow money

Regulate a state’s internal commerce

Declare War

Provide for the general welfare

Establish local governments

Manage elections with foreign relations

Legislate and enforce laws


Establish and maintain state militia

SS.7.C.3.13

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Differences between Florida and U.S. Constitutions

  • The U.S. Constitution addresses the concerns of the nation, such as defense and foreign affairs.

  • The Florida Constitution focuses on matters specific to Florida, such as elections and voting, state finances, taxation, local government, and public education.

  • The Florida Constitution establishes English as the official state language.

  • The Florida Constitution is also easier to amend

  • Passing law in Florida similar to Congress/no “pocket veto” in Florida

  • Preamble

  • Government of 3 branches:

  • Congress

  • President and Vice President

Appointed Cabinet (not in Constitution)

  • Federal Courts: 3 levels




Similarities between Florida and U.S. Constitutions

  • Both have a preamble, articles and amendments.

  • Both view the people as the ultimate source of all governmental power.

  • The Florida Constitution includes the Florida Declaration of Rights, which echoes the U.S. Bill of Rights.

  • Both documents outline similar governmental structures: legislatures with a Senate and a House, executive branches led by a chief executive and court systems with trial courts, appellate courts, and a supreme court.




U.S. Constitution

(SS.7.C.3.14)

  • Federal government meets national needs, such as defense & foreign policy.

  • State governments meet statewide needs, such as educational requirements.

  • Local governments meet local concerns, such as running a school district.

Federalism

  • Division of power between federal and state governments

  • “Reserved “ powers (left to the states)

  • “Concurrent” powers (shared by federal and states)

  • Supremacy Clause

  • Preamble

  • Florida Declaration of Rights (like Bill of Rights)

  • State Government of 3 branches:

  • Governor and Lt. Governor

  • Elected Cabinet

  • Florida State Legislature

Florida House of Representatives: up to 120 members

Florida Senate: up to 40 members

  • Florida Courts: 4 levels

Florida Constitution

The U.S. Constitution vs. Florida Constitution

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Federalism

and State and



Local Governments


Obligations and Services of Governments




SS.7.C.3.13

  • Government Obligations and Services

    • Federal Government

      • National Issues:

        • National defense (the Military)

        • Foreign policy

        • American economy

      • Federal Courts:

        • Protect the rights of citizens guaranteed by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights

        • Interpret federal law

    • State Government

      • Florida State Government regulates the following:

        • State businesses and insurance

        • Licenses professionals (such as teachers, lawyers and doctors)

        • Builds and maintains state highways (I-4 or 17-92)

        • Issues and enforces rules for traffic safety (speeding limits)

        • Drivers licenses

        • Regulates state utilities (Duke Energy)

        • Creates building construction codes

      • It also operates the State’s:

        • Public education system (Florida Department of Education)

        • Regulates conservation, pollution, and public health throughout the state

    • Local Government

      • Florida’s local governments address the daily local needs of their people, such as:

        • Operating their public school districts (Volusia County School Board)

        • Managing local police and fire departments

        • Overseeing local sewage and garbage disposal


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