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FAULKNER UNIVERSITY

SYLLABUS


FOR

COURSE NUMBER AND NAME: PY/ED 3380 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: The study of research and theories of problem solving and the acquisition of retention verbal and nonverbal behavior. Taught in cooperation with the Department of Education and focuses on application to the classroom.

PREREQUISITES: PY 1310

NUMBER OF HOURS CREDIT: THREE

__________________________________________________

Dean, Alabama Christian College of Arts and Sciences

Support Programs for Students with Disabilities at Faulkner University


The Center for Special Services (Student Support Services and Project Key) serves as the central contact point for students with disabilities and seeks to ensure equal access for students with physical, psychological, and/or *cognitive disabilities. Students are responsible for informing the University of their needs for accommodations and services.

Contact: Center for Special Services: 334-386-7185 or 1-800-879-9816

*learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, etc.

PY/ED 3380 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

R. JOEL FARRELL II, PHD, LPC, NCC

I. PURPOSE: An introduction to the principles of psychology applied to the educational environment and the process of learning. Emphasis is on exploring the theoretical foundation and the pragmatic implications found in the field of educational psychology. The course will address the role of the learner, the teacher, and the environment in facilitating learning. The course has been designed to be responsive to the Alabama Prospective Teacher Test (APTT), the Alabama Professional Education Personnel Evaluation Program (PEPE, teacher evaluation process upon which the clinical teaching experience evaluations are modeled at Faulkner University), the Alabama State Department of Education Certification requirements, the National Council on Accreditation of Teacher Education standards (NCATE), INTASC standards, and the National Board for Professional Teacher Standards (NBPTS).

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES: At the conclusion of this course the successful student will:


  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical foundations of educational psychology.

  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical foundations of educational psychology.

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology, methods, influences, principles, and ethics in the application of educational psychology.

  4. Demonstrate an understanding of learner diversity and appropriate applications for different learners in educational psychology.

  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of assessment and evaluation in educational psychology.

III. This course is viewed as a facilitative and cooperative learning partnership between the faculty member and the student. The success of this partnership depends on every student fully engaging in the class experience, keeping up with readings and other assignments, and conducting themselves in a professional and virtuous manner. The faculty member’s role is to provide guidance, resources, and information as needed, modeling feedback, instructional activities, and assistance in integrating information. The course is grounded in constructivist learning theory. The course is designed as a learner-centered experience with the students being intimately involved in the course materials and activities. This course is an upper-level course and students will be expected to demonstrate development of critical thinking and ingenuity over the length of the course.

VI. CONTENT OUTLINE: The course topics are as follows: (for specific dates see course calendar)



  1. Introduction and Overview of Course

  2. Student Development

  3. Views of Learning

  4. Motivation

  5. Teaching

  6. Assessment

  7. Course Summary & Review

V. RESOURCES:

  1. REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

    1. Slavin, R. E. (2003). Educational psychology theory and practice (7th Ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN: 0205351433 http://wps.ablongman.com/ab_slavin_edpsych_7

    2. Slavin, R. E. (2003) Education psychology value pack. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN 0205391621

    3. Donovan, M. S., Bransford, J. D., & Pellegrino, J. W. (2000). How people learn. National Research Council: Washington, D.C. Located at website http://books.nap.edu/html/howpeople2

    4. Livetext.

  2. CRITICAL READINGS:

    1. American Psychological Association (1995). Learner-centered psychological principles:Guidelines for the teaching of educational psychology in teacher education programs. Washington, DC: American Psychological Associaiton. http://www.apa.org/ed/lcp2/lcp14.html

    2. Ancess, J. (2000) The reciprocal influence of teacher learning, teaching practice, school restructuring, and student learning outcomes. Teachers College Record, 102, (3), 590-619

    3. Glasser, W. (2000). Creating the competence based classroom. Chatsworth, CA: William Glasser Institute

    4. Thorndike, E. L. (1910). The contribution of psychology to education.. Journal of Educational Psychology, 1, 5-12. http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Thorndike/education.htm

    5. King, M. L. (1947) The purpose of education. Maroon Tiger: 10 http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/publications/papers/vol1/470200-The_Purpose_of_Education.htm

  3. SUPPLEMENTARY/SUGGESTED TEXTS/RESOURCES

    1. Psychwatch located at www.psychwatch.com

    2. Psych Web located at www.psywww.com

    3. Classics in the history of psychology located at http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/

    4. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards located at www.nbpts.org

    5. Developing educational standards located at edstandards.org/Standards.html

    6. U. S. Department of Education located at www.ed.gov

    7. Alabama Department of Education located at www.alsde.edu

VI. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

A. FORMAL ASSESSMENT



  1. Formal Examinations (FE): One formal examination will be administered in this course. The exam will address all course materials. The exam may consist of constructed response (multiple-choice, forced choice, matching, etc.) and/or free response (essay, short answer, etc.) items. The exam will be worth 200 points.

  2. Individual Research Paper (IPR). Each student will prepare a research paper on the theory/ies of educational psychology and pedagogy they plan to utilize practice. The paper will present: (a) a research-based definition of the theory/ies, (b) history/background of the theory/ies and key persons, (c) the key characteristics of the theory/ies, and (d) the practical implication of the theory/ies. The paper you write must include your own original analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the information you present. In other words, this is not to be a simple "term paper" in which you merely regurgitate information. The entire project is worth 200 points

  3. Critical Readings. Each student will read two bodies of materials for this course, prepare a written critique of each reading, and participate in a discussion of each reading. The critique is a critical analysis of the content and implications of the article not a regurgitation or report of the readings content. The critique is a critical thinking based activity.

    1. Critical Analysis of Textbook Readings (CATR): Each student will read the texts by Slavin and by Donovan, Bransford, & Pellegrino. For the Donovan, Bransford, & Pellegrino text each student will prepare a five-page critical analysis of the text. Each summary critical analysis is worth 25 points for a total of 25 points.

    2. Critical Reading (CAR). Each student will read a set of scholarly articles including those listed in the syllabus. Additional articles will be assigned during the course. Each student will prepare a two-page critique for each article assigned. Each critique is worth 5 points for a total of 25 points

  4. International Implications of Education Projects (IIEP): Each student will complete the following two projects related to international education. Each project is worth 50 points for a total of 100 points.

    1. Project I: Study of informal education in England Reference Website: http://www.infed.org/thinkers/

        1. Each student will complete the walking tour of informal education in person or virtually via the web and summarize the experience. http://www.infed.org/walking/default.htm

        2. Each student will summarize the history of informal education. http://www.infed.org/thinkers/et-hist.htm

        3. Each student will prepare a brief review of the major informal education theorists and correlate them to the http://www.infed.org/thinkers/index.htm

          1. Thomas John Barnardo

          2. Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell

          3. Canon Samuel and Henrietta Barnett

          4. George Birkbeck

          5. Friedrich Wilhelm August Froebel

          6. Homer Lane

          7. Maria Montessori

          8. Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi

          9. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

          10. Mary Ward and the Passmore Edwards Settlement (now Mary Ward House)

          11. George Williams

          12. Mary Wollstonecraft

          13. Basil Yeaxlee

b. Project II: International Studies Discussion Essays. Each student will prepare an essay on the following topics. Each essay is should be approximately three to five pages.

              1. Discuss the historical foundations of education, psychology, pedagogy, and educational psychology in England, the United States, and internationally.

              2. Discuss the dominant major theories of pedagogy and educational psychology utilized in England, the United States, and internationally.

              3. Discuss the nature and role of diversity in England, England, the United States, and internationally and its impact on educational psychology and education.

              4. Discuss the cultural basis of education, psychology, pedagogy, and educational psychology in England, the United States, and internationally.

B. INFORMAL ASSESSMENT

  1. Professional Development Journals (PDJ). Each student will complete a set of professional development activities. Each activity is worth 5 points for a total of 50 points.

  2. Class Professionalism/Participation (CAP): Each student will engage in the classroom-learning environment and contribute to the discussions in a positive manner. Your presence and input is valued and required. Class professionalism and participation will be assessed for the course. Active participation is timely completion of assignments, engaging in discussions, raising relevant questions, etc. and is determined by the instructor. A total of 10 points will be possible for CAP.

VII. COURSE GRADING

Determining the total number of points accumulated by each student and then dividing this by the total number of points possible will compute letter grades. The following chart summarizes the points possible for each course requirement and overall.



ITEM

Quantity

Points

Total Points

FE

1

100

200

IPR

1

100

100

CATRR

1

25

25

CAR

5

5

25

IIEP

2

50

100

PDJ

10

5

50

CAP

1

10

10

Totals







510

VIII. COURSE CALENDAR

Week No.

Class Activity

1

PDJ 1; Begin IIEP Project I

2

PDJ 2; CAR: King; CAR: Thorndike;IIEP Project I

3

PDJ 3; CATR: Donovan, et al; IIEP Project I

4

PDJ 4; IIEP Project I

5

PDJ 5; CAR: APA; IIEP Project I

6

PDJ 6; IIEP Project I

7

PDJ 7; IIEP Project II: Essay I

8

PDJ 8; IIEP Project II: Essay II

9

PDJ 9; IIEP Project II: Essay III

10

PDJ 10; IIEP Project II: Essay IV

11

IPR; CAR: Ancess; CAR: Glasser

12

Final Exam

IX. INSTRUCTOR CONTACT INFORMATION

  1. E-mail: jfarrell@faulkner.edu

X. ACADEMIC HONESTY

The University's policies on academic dishonesty are clearly indicated in the student handbook. I will follow them in any cases that occur in my class. Please understand that plagiarism is cheating. It occurs any time an individual uses another person’s words or ideas without citing the author. Changing just a few words and not citing the author is also plagiarism. Copying items from the internet is plagiarism. If you doubt, then cite!



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