Exploring the Connections: Foreign Policy and Internationalism



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Exploring the Connections: Foreign Policy and Internationalism


Students describe how a country has been involved in peacekeeping and foreign aid, and how these actions are supported by that country's foreign policy.

Instructional Support


A number of possible tasks are provided in this suggested activity. It is not intended that you work through all of the tasks, but rather select those tasks and resources that will best meet the learning needs of your students. The focus should be on ensuring that students have the background and support to be successful with the skill that is the focus for assessment (describe how foreign policy could support internationalism).

Setting the Context for Learning


  • Have students review the video Girl Who Silenced the UN for 5 Minutes or a similar video/source of your choice where an individual's actions/words raised UN awareness regarding an important global issue.

  • Ask students to consider what Severn Suzuki would say are the most important motives for Canada to participate in internationalism. Would she support a reduced role for Canadian involvement in international affairs? Why or why not?

Describe How Foreign Policy Could Support Internationalism


  • Discuss with students the difference between domestic and foreign policy. Share with students Canada's Foreign Policy Priorities (Figure 10-18, page 237, McGraw-Hill Ryerson's student resource Understanding Nationalism). Present examples from current events of actions that the Canadian government has taken; discuss how each example represents either pursuit of Canada's national interest and Canadian nationalism or internationalism.

  • Explore Canada's support of UN peacekeeping missions by visiting a variety of websites that examine both the benefits and challenges of Canada's participation in these missions. Myths and Facts – Canada and UN Peacekeeping is a good teacher resource site.

  • Engage students in discussion so they can recognize the benefits as well as the challenges of Canada's participation in peacekeeping missions. Discuss the implications of these missions for Canadians, and the implications of these missions for citizens in the countries that are being helped. Encourage students to consider the perspectives of the peacekeepers and the peacekeepers' families.

  • Facilitate a discussion with students about how Canada can balance involvement in international affairs with the national interests of Canada. Use Canada's involvement in the Afghanistan war as an example. Examine:

    • why Canada participated in the mission

    • successes and challenges of the mission

    • how the mission was connected to the national goals and/or the national interests of Canada

    • how the mission was connected to the foreign policy goals of Canada.

Note: In the Afghanistan war, Canadian soldiers did not participate as peacekeeping troops; however, Canadian involvement in the war is a strong example of how participation in international affairs is connected to foreign policy goals.

  • Engage students in discussion to recognize the benefits as well as the challenges of Canada providing foreign aid to countries that are struggling or experiencing natural disasters. Examples could include providing aid for the food crisis in East Africa and to Libya during the civil unrest. Discuss the implications for Canadians, and the implications for citizens in the countries that are being helped.

  • Prompt students to use these examples of Canadian involvement in international affairs as a starting point and to consider other examples of countries participating in international affairs through peacekeeping missions and foreign aid.

  • As students begin to work on the second part of the summative assessment task, describe how foreign policy could support internationalism, share with students that they need to go beyond merely listing ways that countries have participated in international affairs. To fully achieve this focus for assessment, students need to be able to describe how the peacekeeping and foreign aid examples are supported by that country's foreign policy. For example, a student may say that Canada's role in Darfur is supported by Canada's foreign policy to provide peace and security globally through peacekeeping.

  • Encourage struggling students to select Canadian examples. Not only will it be easier for them to connect current events with the examples, but it will also be easier for them to find information on Canada's foreign policy.

Formative Assessment


Throughout this suggested activity, you will support students in achieving the following skill that is the focus for assessment:

The following formative assessment opportunity is provided to help students unpack and develop the focus skill for assessment. Feedback prompts are also provided to help students enhance their demonstration of the focus skill for this activity. Formative assessment support is not intended to generate a grade or score.

Formative Assessment: Assessment for Learning Opportunity

Describe How Foreign Policy Could Support Internationalism


Involve students in peer coaching to provide and receive feedback about the comprehensiveness of their description of how internationalism can be supported by foreign policy. Use the feedback prompts below to provide structure in guiding students through this formative assessment opportunity.

Feedback Prompts:


  • Is the information I provided focused?
    Did I …

    • provide a specific example of international involvement in peacekeeping?

    • relate the example to the country's foreign policy goals?

    • provide a specific example of international involvement in foreign aid?

    • relate the example to the country's foreign policy goals?

These feedback prompts have been incorporated into the Describe How Foreign Policy Could Support Internationalism: Peer Coaching Tool , which can be copied or adapted for student use.

Linking to the Summative Assessment Task


  • As students describe how foreign policy could support internationalism through the suggested activity Exploring the Connections: Foreign Policy and Internationalism, they will have completed the second portion of the Summative Assessment Task: Committing to Internationalism .

  • Students should consult the assessment task and the assessment task rubric  to ensure that they have provided the information required.

  • Encourage students to use the feedback received during the formative assessment opportunity to make enhancements to their work in progress.

  • If necessary, continue to use the feedback prompts from the formative assessment opportunity to coach students toward completion of a quality product.

Suggested Supporting Resources

Textbook References


Student Basic Resource—McGraw-Hill Ryerson, Understanding Nationalism:

  • Pages 224–226 How Do Countries Set Foreign Policy?

  • Pages 227–230 How Can Nation–States Promote Internationalism Through Foreign Policy?

  • Pages 238–239 Canada and Peacekeeping – Myth and Reality

  • Page 283 The View from Here

Teaching Resource—McGraw-Hill Ryerson, Understanding Nationalism:

  • Reproducible 3.10.1 How Canada's Foreign Policy Decisions Affect My Life

  • Reproducible 3.10.2 Comparing Foreign Policy Strategies

  • Reproducible 3.10.3 Sanctions Yes or No?

  • Reproducible 3.11.2 Protecting the Common Human Heritage

  • Reproducible 3.12.2 Picturing Global Issues

  • Reproducible 3.12.3 Criteria for Rating the Success of International Efforts to Address Global Challenges

  • Reproducible 3.12.4 Internationalism and Contemporary Global Issues

  • Reproducible A: Ten Steps to Preparing Research 

  • Reproducible M: Exit Slips

Web Resources

Web Links for Online Sources:


  • LearnAlberta.ca, Online Reference Centre:

    • Global Issues in Context (topic: United Nations)

  • United Nations Association in Canada (UNAC) website and sections:

    • Peace and Security

    • The Canadian Contribution to United Nations Peacekeeping 

    • Teachers' Handbook (lessons)

    • Myths and Facts – Canada and UN Peacekeeping

    • Resources – Links

  • Veterans Affairs Canada website (for teachers) and section: Canada and International Peace Efforts

  • Canadian International Development Agency website 

  • National Defence and the Canadian Forces website—section: Operations

  • Pearson Centre website and section: Multimedia (videos)  

  • United Nations Peacekeeping website

  • Government of Canada website: Canada and Peacekeeping

  • Canadian Association of Veterans in United Nations Peacekeeping website (for teachers) and section: Peacekeeping Day

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police website—section: International Peace Operations 

  • United Nations Peace Operations 2009: Year in Review  (for teachers)

  • Peacekeeper's Home Page website (for teachers) and section: Canadian Peacekeeping News

  • CBC Digital Archives (radio and television clips): 

    • Peacekeepers and Peacemakers: Canada's Diplomatic Contribution

    • Peacekeeper to the World

    • Defence: One for All; The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (1947–2003)

Videos:


  • YouTube.com website: Girl Who Silenced the UN for 5 Minutes

  • LearnAlberta.ca:

    • Historica Minute: John Humphrey (Development of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

    • Roméo Dallaire: Perspectives on Peacekeeping and Global Relationships (Interview Response – Question 1) (for teachers)

    • Roméo Dallaire: The Canadian Identity and Peacekeeping (Interview Response – Question 2) (for teachers)

Critical Challenges:


  • LearnAlberta.ca: 

    • Framing Effective Foreign Policy (B. As a representative of a particular perspective, attempt to reach consensus on a mutually beneficial response to three international issues.)

    • Modelling the Tools: Analyzing a Situation

    • Modelling the Tools: Drawing the Line on Rights

    • Support Material: Using Digital Technologies; Searching and Organizing

    • Modelling the Tools: Assessing Web Site Credibility

    • Support Material: Positive and Negative Factors

    • Support Material: Webbing Ideas

    • Support Material: Justifying My Choice

    • Support Material: Writing Based on a Perspective



Instructional Supports for All Students Social Studies 20-4, Related Issue 3 /

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada Exploring the Connections..., 2013




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