Example 1 with Claim



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LIBERTY

In politics, liberty consists of the social and political freedoms enjoyed by all citizens. The state of being free within society from oppressive restrictions imposed by authority on one's way of life, behavior, or political views; the power or scope to act as one pleases.

Generally, liberty seems to be distinct from freedom in that freedom concerns itself primarily, if not exclusively, with the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty also takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, liberty can be thought of as freedom limited by rights, and therefore cannot be abused.


Your Name:

Example 1 with Claim

Example 1 Reasoning & Evidence

Questions to Ask/Ideas to Share to Clarify Group Thinking about this Concept

Name:

Example 2 with Claim

Example 2 Reasoning & Evidence

Questions to Ask/Ideas to Share to Clarify Group Thinking about this Concept

Name:

Example 3 with Claim

Example 3 Reasoning & Evidence

Questions to Ask/Ideas to Share to Clarify Group Thinking about this Concept

Claim Card Discussion Stems

Can you please clarify why…?

Could you think of that example in a different way if…?

How are you defining…?

What made you think of that?

I’m a little lost in your reasoning. Could you please say it in a different way?

If you added the idea of _______ to your reasoning, how might your claim change?

What if the example were flipped and this _____ was _____?

Are you making the claim that your example meets all of the critical characteristics or just some?



Is this good non-example? Why?

What critical characteristics specifically does your example meet?

Does the time period or culture of the time matter to this example at all? Should that be taken into consideration?

How is your example similar to this other examples? How are they different?

Where on spectrum between fully meeting the critical characteristics and not meeting the concept characteristics would we place this example? Why?

What is the most difficult aspect of this example?



Claim Card Reflection and Self-Assessment

Name: ____________________Concept:_________________Example:______________



Criteria

4-3-2-1

Why?


What was the most interesting idea that came up in your group discussion?

How has your understanding of this concept shifted or changed?



What was the most difficult part of this process for you?

I clearly stated a claim about my example and concept.




I provided reasoning and examples for my claim.




I listened intently to my group members as they spoke.




I took notes on the examples, claims, and reasoning provided by other group members.




I asked two or more questions and clarified ideas that helped the whole group better understand the concept and examples.




I was respectful in my interactions with my group.




The Boy Scouts of America remove a scout leader because he is a homosexual. The scout leader sues because a state law forbids the BSA from discriminating based on sexual orientation. The BSA wins the case.

(Boy Scouts of America v. Dale)

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

The Ku Klux Klan burns a cross at a rally on private land. The burning cross can be seen by nearby houses and from the road. The Klan leader is arrested for burning a cross under Virginia’s law. The case reaches the Supreme Court who rule in favor of the KKK’s right to burn a cross on private property.

(Virginia v. Black)

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

Transport Security Administration (TSA) uses “nude” body scanners as a means of searching passengers before they step onto an airplane. A passenger sues, and a federal court rules in favor of the TSA and keeping the scanners. The Supreme Court refuses to hear the case.

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

In July of 1995, Sandra Houghton was a passenger in a car stopped for speeding. While the police were questioning the driver they noticed a syringe in his pocket. When questioned, he told the police that the syringe was used for drugs. Houghton and the other passenger were ordered out of the car and were searched. The officers then searched the car for drugs. While searching the car, the officers found a closed purse. After Houghton told the police the purse was hers, the police searched the purse and found drugs. Houghton was arrested for drug possession. The Supreme Court decided searching a closed item (purse) during a legal search was appropriate.

(Wyoming v. Houghton)

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

A person is arrested in Maryland for a violent crime, but is not convicted. While processing the suspect, the state requires each person being booked submit to a cheek swab DNA test. The person is released, and their DNA was run through Maryland’s database, and it returned with a positive match from a 2003 crime scene. The suspect sues and wants the DNA evidence suppressed because he was not convicted of the crime. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the state.

(Maryland V. King )

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

Students at a school sponsored, off campus parade hold up a sign that promotes illegal drug use, “Bong hits for Jesus.” The school suspends the students, who sue based on the violation of the 1st Amendment. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the school.

(Morse V. Frederick)

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

A state requires officers to check the immigration status of anyone they stop or detain if there is reasonable suspicion that the person is an undocumented immigrant. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the state.

(Arizona V. United States)

Does this decision demonstrate liberty? Explain your reason.

Protesting a soldier’s funeral

(Snyder v. Phelps)

Private companies not paying for birth control, because of Religious beliefs

(Burwell v. Hobby Lobby)

Prohibiting people from buying violent video games

(Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association)

Private company doesn’t want to hire someone who is openly gay (McClure vs. Sports & Health Club)

Private company refuses to take pictures for same sex wedding

(Elaine Photography v. Willcock)

Cyber Bulling as free speech

(Kowalski v. Berkeley County Schools)

Students praying at football games

(Santa Fe Independent School Dist. v. Doe)

Teachers teaching historical lessons from the Bible in public school

(Stone vs. Graham)

Banning soda and other sugary drinks larger than 24 Oz

(New York Statewide Coalition of Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, v. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

Burning the United States’ flag

(Texas v. Johnson)

Burning a cross

(Virginia v. Black)

Calling for the overthrow of a government

(Yates v. United States)

Buffer zones around abortion clinics prevent people from protesting (McCullen v. Coakley)

Putting limits on how much an individual can donate to a campaign (McCutcheon v. FEC)

An illegal search that leads to a lawful arrest. (Passenger of a bus has his carryon luggage inspected by a police officer, who squeezes the bag. He then opens the bag and finds a brick of meth and arrests the passenger.)

(Bond v. United States)

A drug dog is used to sniff a porch to give the police reasonable suspicion. The judge issues a warrant which leads to an arrest yielding 25lbs of marijuana.

(Florida v. Jardines)

CASE STUDY

(Illinois v. Caballes)


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