English Grade 7 Year-at-a-Glance (sample)



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English Grade 7 Year-at-a-Glance (SAMPLE)


DRAFT







Dear Teachers,


This document is a draft of an LPSS Year-at-a-Glance that includes sample anchor texts and related texts for four modules at one grade level. Other documents in this folder contain similar samples for the other grades in the 6-12 range. You received a link to the entire folder because conversations between teachers of all grade levels are critically important in this process of aligning our curriculum to the Common Core State Standards, so it may be useful to glance through all grade level samples.

These LPSS samples reflect the hard work of a great many classroom teachers who studied LPSS texts and resources, analyzed LDOE modules, and collaborated with other teachers from across the parish with the goal of creating text sets that match the needs and resources of LPSS. Teachers from every middle and high school were invited to participate in this work, and every school was invited to submit a list of resources to aid in the work.

These documents are works in progress, and while you may begin the process of getting ready for the 2013-2014 school year, please note that revisions are ongoing. We are soliciting your feedback about any aspect of these drafts and particularly welcome your suggestions for related texts of the informational variety and for those located within the grade-level textbook. The inclusion of a text within Appendix B of the CCSS or as the anchor text of an LDOE module disqualifies that text for use at an alternate grade level as an LPSS anchor text. A protocol for substitution of text sets is located in this folder and will aid schools in developing school-specific text sets.

When purchasing resources for a particular grade level, please refer to Appendix B of the CCSS, the LDOE samples, and the LPSS sample drafts. Middle school teachers should also consult the LDOE 4th and 5th grade samples to prevent the overlapping of texts with lower grade levels.

Please contact one of the lead teachers with your feedback!

Laurie Godshall
337-296-4126
lcgodshall@lpssonline.com

Libby Nehrbass


337-298-0387
esnehrbass@lpssonline.com

Michelle Salts


337-303-4517
dmsalts@lpssonline.com



Purpose of Planning

Unit One

Unit Two

Unit Three

Unit Four

Build students’ knowledge:

Illustrate how knowledge builds through texts within and across grades




The Giver, Lois Lowry (Literary) 760L

LDOE Anchor Text is the same

The Lion, the

Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis (Literary) 870L Disqualified because used as an anchor text in LDOE’s 5th grade module

LDOE Anchor Text: The Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens (Literary), non-leveled or adapted version

Chains, Laurie Halse Anderson

(Literary) 780L




LDOE Anchor Text: Behind the Scenes, Or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House, Elizabeth Keckley (Informational)


Wonder, R.J. Palacio (Literary) 790L

LDOE Anchor Text: “How to Write a Memoir,” The American Scholar, William Zinsser (Informational)

Students will learn about community and how belief systems are established. They will explore the ideas of humanity and choice and how people control others.

Students will learn that writers use stories and tales to teach us lessons or to convey moral codes that reflect societal and cultural values. They will come to understand how experiences with literature resonate with readers and have staying power to become part of our cultural beliefs.

Students study different perspectives of American History through personal accounts, primary and secondary sources, and literary reflections. They will come to understand defining periods in our country’s history.

Students will explore lives in transition and discover that hope often comes in unlikely places. Students will learn about the craft of writing from professional writers, observing firsthand the connection between reading and writing.

Increase text complexity1:

Illustrate how text complexity increases within and across grades



The readability of the anchor text falls below the text complexity grade-level band, but the meaning of the text is layered and complex, asking students to think about sophisticated social and political concepts. The related texts are similar in complexity to the anchor.

The readability of the anchor text is at the upper end of the text complexity grade-level band, but is appropriate for reading with instructional support. The additional related texts fall within the 6-8 grade band and are appropriate for grade 7.

This set contains several text exemplars from Appendix B of the CCSS. The Killer Angels is from a higher grade band, and is included to challenge students. The additional related texts fall within the grades 6-8 band and are appropriate for grade 7.

The readability of the anchor text measures at the end of the grades 6-8 band. This set is included at the end because of the independent reading and writing expectations of students.

Integrate standards around texts:

Provide multiple opportunities for students to develop their literacy



The PARCC Model Content Frameworks provide an overview of how the standards can be integrated and centered around the reading of complex texts. The frameworks include:

  • A sample visual of how a year might be organized,

  • An overview of the Common Core State Standard expectations in grade 7,

  • Writing standards progression from grade 6 to grade 7, and

  • Speaking and Listening standards progression from grade 6 to grade 7.

The plan below provides a sample of the specific year-long content for grade 7 based on the PARCC Model Content Frameworks.





Unit One

Anchor Text

The Giver, Lois Lowry (Literary) 760L

LDOE Anchor is the same


Related Texts

Literary Texts

  • Excerpts from The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins

  • “Harrison Bergeron,” Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

  • “The Lottery,” Shirley Jackson

  • “The Human Abstract,” William Blake (Poem)

  • “The Road Not Taken,” Robert Frost (Poem)

In textbook

  • “Monsters Are Due on Maple Street,” Rod Serling

  • “Dark They Were and Golden-Eyed,” Ray Bradbury

  • “The War of the Wall,” Toni Cade Bambara

  • “The Last Dog,” Katherine Paterson

  • “Eating Alone,” Li-Young Lee

  • “Spring Harvest of Snow Peas,” Maxine Hong Kingston

  • Trash, Andy Mulligan 860L

  • Divergent, Veronica Roth 700L excluded, assigned to alternate grade level

  • I Am Number Four, Pittacus Lore 850L

  • Z for Zachariah, Robert C. O’Brien 820L

  • Among the Hidden, Margaret C. Haddix 800L

Informational Texts

  • Individual Rights and Community Responsibilities,” Pat Nanzer

  • Excerpts (i.e., The Preamble and First Amendment) from Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution by Linda R. Monk (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • Additional texts about topics that support students’ understanding of the anchor text (as needed)

In textbook

  • “Back to the Wall” from People

  • “Homeless,” Anna Quindlen

Non-print Texts (e.g., Media, Website, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics)

  • Clips from The Hunger Games, Gary Ross

  • 2081, Chandler Tuttle

  • Imagine,” John Lennon

  • Clips from The Truman Show, Peter Weir or The Village, M. Night Shyamalan

Building Student Knowledge

Through the study of dystopian literature and related informational texts, students will explore how belief systems are established and called into question. They will learn how their choices and actions (or lack of) affect others and the ways that people control others. They will consider the value of community when individuals suffer and the value of perfection and equality if it means giving up pain, emotions, and human connections. They will come to understand how their lives are shaped by their perceptions and the importance of knowledge and memory for living a complete life.



Common Core State Standards2

Theme: Challenging Belief Systems

Text Complexity Rationale

While the readability of the anchor text falls below the text complexity grade-level band, the meaning of the text is layered and complex, asking students to think about sophisticated social and political concepts. The related texts are similar in complexity to the anchor. Students should be able to read the words of these texts independently, but teacher scaffolding and support through collaborative groups and discussions will help students fully understand the texts. The Lexile levels are provided for each novel and for differentiated options.




Reading

RL.7.1, RL.7.2., RL.7.3, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, RL.7.6, RL.7.7, RL.7.9, RL.7.10

RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.3, RI.7.4, RI.7.5, RI.7.6, RI.7.8, RI.7.9, RI.7.10
Writing

W.7.1, W.7.2, W.7.3, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.6, W.7.7, W.7.8, W.7.9, W.7.10


Speaking and Listening

SL.7.1, SL.7.2, SL.7.3, SL.7.4, SL.7.5, SL.7.6


Language

L.7.1, L.7.2, L.7.3, L.7.4, L.7.5, L.7.6



Sample Research 3

Create structured independent reading of additional dystopian novels. Have students complete inquiry-based assignments such as; research real life utopian societies and comparing and contrasting with their text and then present information to the class. For students reading similar texts, create opportunities for discussion. Some example texts:



  • Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins

  • Unwind, Neal Shusterman

  • Divergent, Veronica Roth excluded, assigned to alternate grade level

  • Uglies, Scott Westerfeld

  • Feed, M.T. Anderson

  • 1984, George Orwell




Possible Teacher Resources:


SPED Options: City of Ember, Jeanne Du Prau (lower level) 680L



Unit Two

Anchor Text

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis (Literary) 870L Disqualified because used as an anchor text in LDOE’s 5th grade module

LDOE Anchor Text: A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens (Literary), non-leveled or adapted version

Related Texts

Literary Texts

Short Stories:



  • The Gift of the Magi,” O. Henry (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • “Retrieved Reformation,” O. Henry (in literature book)

  • “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi,” Rudyard Kipling (in literature book)

  • “The Scholarship Jacket,” Marta Salinas (in literature book)

Drama:

  • A Christmas Carol (in literature book)

  • A Reader’s Theatre version of A Christmas Carol (SCOPE Magazine, Scholastic)

Oral Traditions as Reflection of Culture:

  • Excerpt from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight – Medieval legend (in literature book)

  • Excerpt from Young Arthur – Medieval legend (in literature book)

  • “Brer Possum’s Dilemma” – African American folk tale (in literature book

  • “Waters of Gold” – Chinese folk tale (in literature book)

  • “Sally Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind” – American tall tale (in literature book)

  • “The Race Between Toad and Donkey” –Jamaican fable (in literature book)

  • “Two Ways to Count to Ten” – Liberian fable (in literature book)

Poetry:


  • “Casey at the Bat” (in literature book)

  • “The Highwayman” (in literature book)

  • “The Names” (in literature book)

  • “Abuelito Who” (in literature book)

  • “The Courage My Mother Had” (in literature book)

  • “Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” (in literature book)

  • “The Delight Song of Tsoai-Talee” (in literature book)

  • “Gold” (in literature book)

  • “It Was a Long Time Before” (in literature book)


Informational Texts

  • “Who Was King Arthur?” – magazine article (in literature book)

  • “Do Pro Athletes Get Paid Too Much?” – editorial (in literature book)

  • “Pro Athletes’ Salaries Aren’t Overly Exorbitant” – editorial (in literature book)

  • “When the Curtain Comes Up on the Second Act” – magazine article (paired with “Retrieved Reformation” in textbook ancillary workbook Interactive Reader and Writer for Critical Analysis)

  • “Juvenile Justice on Trial” – editorial (paired with “Retrieved Reformation” in textbook ancillary workbook Interactive Reader and Writer for Critical Analysis)

  • “Names/Nombre” – essay (in literature book)

  • “Name That Child: How Culture and Tradition Influence Choices” – online article (paired with “Names /Nombre” in textbook ancillary workbook Interactive Reader and Writer for Critical Analysis)

  • Charles Dickens: Six Things He Gave the Modern World,” Alex Hudson (BBC News)

  • Additional texts about topics that support students’ understanding of the anchor text (as needed)


Non-print Texts (e.g., Media, Website, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics

  • How to Study Cultures: How Beliefs and Values Define a Culture (video on Discovery Education)

  • Chronicles of Narnia full-length film

  • The Enduring Popularity of the Works of C. S. Lewis (video segment on Discovery Education)

  • Long Ago and Far Away (video segment on Discovery Education)

  • The Legend of King Arthur (video segment on Discovery Education)

  • Live drama or filmed version of A Christmas Carol (example)

Building Student Knowledge

Students will learn that writers use stories and tales to teach us lessons or to convey moral codes that reflect societal and cultural values. For this particular set, students will study cultural values and how they are reflected through various genres of literature, including oral traditions and nonfiction texts that reflect culture through different time periods. Examples of values found in this set include the role of sacrifice, possessions, love, integrity, courage, pride, strength, and intelligence in society.



Common Core State Standards4


Theme: Moral Codes

Reading

RL.7.1, RL.7.2., RL.7.3, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, RL.7.6, RL.7.7, RL.7.9, RL.7.10

RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.3, RI.7.4, RI.7.5, RI.7.6, RI.7.8, RI.7.9, RI.7.10
Writing

W.7.1, W.7.2, W.7.3, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.6, W.7.7, W.7.8, W.7.9, W.7.10


Speaking and Listening

SL.7.1, SL.7.2, SL.7.3, SL.7.4, SL.7.5, SL.7.6


Language

L.7.1, L.7.2, L.7.3, L.7.4, L.7.5, L.7.6



Text Complexity Rationale

The readability of the anchor text is at the upper end of the text complexity grade-level band, but is appropriate for reading with instructional support. The additional related texts fall within the 6-8 grade band and are appropriate for grade 7. The Lexile levels are provided for each novel and for differentiated options.







Sample Research

Students will investigate various cultures, learning about their religion, art, conflict, daily life, government, and fundamental beliefs. Students will create a multimedia presentation of findings. They will also write an expository piece comparing our culture to the one they researched, citing examples of differences / similarities from the research and their own lives.





Possible Teacher Resources:

Teaching Dickens with the New York Times,” Katherine Schulten and Shannon Doyne (The Learning Network, New York Times)


SPED Options:

The Hobbit , J.R.R. Tolkien– higher level text

The Lightning Thief, Rick Riordan – lower level text excluded, assigned to alternate grade level



Unit Three

Anchor Text

Chains, Laurie Halse Anderson

(Literary) 780L


LDOE Anchor Text: Behind the Scenes, Or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House, Elizabeth Keckley



Related Texts

Literary Texts

  • Excerpts from The Killer Angels, Michael Shaara (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • “The People Could Fly,” Virginia Hamilton (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • “I, Too, Sing America,” Langston Hughes (Appendix B Exemplar, Poem)

  • O Captain! My Captain!,” Walt Whitman (Appendix B Exemplar, Poem)

  • Fever, 1763, Laurie Halse Anderson 580L excluded, assigned to alternate grade level

  • Day of Tears, Julius Lester 800L

  • Witness, Karen Hesse 800L

  • Elijah of Buxton, Christopher Paul Curtis 1070L

In Textbook

  • “The Charge of the Light Brigade,” Alfred , Lord Tennyson (Poem)

  • Washington Monument by Night,” Carl Sandburg (poem)

  • from Out of the Dust, Karen Hesse (excerpt)

Informational Texts

  • Amendments XIII, XIV, and XIV of the US Constitution or the annotated version

  • Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass: The Story Behind an American Friendship, Russell Freedman

  • Excerpts from Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad, Ann Petry (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • “Chapter 11” from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Frederick Douglass (Appendix B Exemplars)

  • “Letter from Frederick Douglass”

  • “Speech on the Death of William Lloyd Garrison,” Frederick Douglass

  • The Boys’ War, Primary Documents Jim Murphy

In Textbook

  • “The Collected Grief of a Nation,” Judith Weinraub

  • “A Mother’s Words,” Eleanor Wimbish

  • “Timeline: U.S. Involvement in Vietnam”

Nonprint Texts (e.g., Media, Website, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics)

  • Clips from Glory, Edward Zwick

  • “Lincoln Announces Freedom” from The Abolitionists, PBS

  • “A Eulogy to the Movement” from The Abolitionists, PBS

  • “Teaching with Documents: The War in Vietnam- A Story in Photographs,” from National Archives

  • “Vietnam Online,” from American Experience, PBS

  • American Revolution Links

  • History

  • Smithsonian

  • John and Abigail Adams,” from American Experience, PBS

  • “The American Revolution,” from American Experience, PBS

Building Student Knowledge

Students will come to understand more fully defining periods in our country’s history, which challenged our foundational beliefs and saw great leaders emerge from adversity. They will explore different perspectives through personal accounts, primary and secondary sources, and literary reflections. This set connects to social studies.



Common Core State Standards5

Theme: Defining Periods in American History

Reading

RL.7.1, RL.7.2., RL.7.3, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, RL.7.6, RL.7.7, RL.7.9, RL.7.10

RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.3, RI.7.4, RI.7.5, RI.7.6, RI.7.8, RI.7.9, RI.7.10
Writing

W.7.1, W.7.2, W.7.3, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.6, W.7.7, W.7.8, W.7.9, W.7.10


Speaking and Listening

SL.7.1, SL.7.2, SL.7.3, SL.7.4, SL.7.5, SL.7.6


Language

L.7.1, L.7.2, L.7.3, L.7.4, L.7.5, L.7.6



Text Complexity Rationale

This set contains several text exemplars from Appendix B of the CCSS. The Killer Angels is from a higher grade band, and is included to challenge students, but it will require some additional scaffolding and support. The additional related texts fall within the 6-8 grade band and are appropriate for grade 7. The Lexile levels are provided for each novel and for differentiated options.



Sample Research

Students will investigate historical accounts of time periods (including the anchor and related texts) and compare and contrast those against fictional portrayals (either from the related texts or additional texts). They will then write a report about how authors of fiction use or alter history and present their findings through a multimedia presentation.






Possible Teacher Resources

  • The Gathering Storm Exhibit for the Classroom, The Civil War Trust

  • The Abolistionists, PBS and “William Lloyd Garrison and the Liberator,” USHistory.org


SPED Options:

Forty Acres and Maybe a Mule, Harriet GillenRobinet L610 (lower level)

Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane L900 (higher level) excluded, assigned to alternate grade level



Unit Four

Anchor Text

Wonder, R.J. Palacio (Literary) 790L



LDOE Anchor Text: “How to Write a Memoir,” William Zinsser (Informational)

Related Texts

Literary Texts

  • Eleven,” Sandra Cisneros (Appendix B Exemplar)

  • Oranges,” Gary Soto (Appendix B Exemplar, Poem)

  • Thank You M’am,” Langston Hughes

  • Excerpts from Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie

  • Finding My Voice, Marie G Lee 755L

  • “The Memory Strings” Eve Bunting 290L

  • “Fly Away Home” Eve Bunting 450L

  • “Grandpas Face” Eloise Greenfield 610L

  • Peak, Roland Smith 760L

In Textbook

  • “An American Childhood,” Annie Dillard

  • The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt

  • “Dirk the Protector,” Gary Paulsen

  • “Encounter with Martin King Jr.,” Maya Angelou

  • “The Noble Experiment,” Jackie Robinson as told to Alfred Duckett

  • “Zebra,” Chaim Potok

  • “Amigo Brothers,” Piri Thomas

  • “Seventh Grade,” Gary Soto

  • “What Do Fish Have to Do with Anything?” Avi

Informational Texts

  • Excerpts from The Elements of Style (Illustrated), William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White (e.g., “Chapter V: An Approach to Style”)

  • “Toolbox” and “On Writing” from On Writing, Stephen King

  • Short Memoirs: Six Little Words Can be Revealing,” Doug Mason

  • How to Write a Memoir,” The American Scholar, William Zinsser

Nonprint Texts (e.g., Media, Website, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics)

  • Advice from Stephen King,” Stephen King

  • Clips from “42” Jackie Robinson Movie

Building Student Knowledge

How do writers present the challenges that adolescents face as they “grow up”? Students will learn about memoirs and “coming of age” literature. They will explore lives in transition and discover that hope often comes in unlikely places. Students will learn about the craft of writing from professional writers and begin to explore their own voice and style as a writer, observing firsthand the connection between reading and writing.



Common Core State Standards6

Theme: Memoir

Reading

RL.7.1, RL.7.2., RL.7.3, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, RL.7.6, RL.7.7, RL.7.9, RL.7.10

RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.3, RI.7.4, RI.7.5, RI.7.6, RI.7.8, RI.7.9, RI.7.10
Writing

W.7.1, W.7.2, W.7.3, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.6, W.7.7, W.7.8, W.7.9, W.7.10


Speaking and Listening

SL.7.1, SL.7.2, SL.7.3, SL.7.4, SL.7.5, SL.7.6


Language

L.7.1, L.7.2, L.7.3, L.7.4, L.7.5, L.7.6



Text Complexity Rationale

The readability of the anchor text measures toward the end of the 6-8 grade band range. While it is suitable for this grade, especially being at the end of the year, students may still need some scaffolding in reading the text. The related texts are appropriate for this grade. The Lexile levels are provided for each novel and for differentiated options.



Sample Research

Create structured independent reading of memoirs (from within the grade band). Students will complete assignments with the texts, focused on lessons learned about writing and memoirs. For students reading similar texts, create opportunities for discussion. Some possible memoirs:



  • Funny in Farsi, Firoozeh Dumas

  • Bad Boy: A Memoir, Walter Dean Myers

  • Chinese Cinderella, Adeline Yen Mah

  • The Circuit, Francisco Jimenez

  • At the End of Words: A Daughter’s Memoir, Miriam Stone

  • A Summer Life, Gary Soto

  • Stitches, David Small

  • “C.V.” from On Writing, Stephen King

  • Growing Up, Russell Baker

When students are done reading memoirs, they will analyze the differences in the authors’ styles and present the information to the class. Then each student will write a narrative of an event or several events in their life as the beginning of a memoir.

Possible Resources:

  • Writing Next, Alliance for Excellent Education

  • Using “mentor texts” to teach writing: http://corbettharrison.com/mentortext.html and www.teachmentortexts.com


SPED Options

House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros (higher level) 870L

Things Not Seen, Andrew Clements (Lower level) 690L

Hurricane Song, Paul Volponi (higher level) 850L

1 By the end of grade 7, students should demonstrate the ability to read and understand texts in the 6-8 grade band proficiently, which scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range (RL.7.10, RI.7.10). This plan provides direction for whole-class instruction with opportunities for student collaboration and rereading. Support for students outside of whole-class instruction should build student proficiency with reading grade-level texts. This might involve: for weaker readers—continued fluency work and reading of easier, related texts to support, not substitute or replace, the whole-class text; for on-level readers—continued support for students in reading the whole-class text (i.e., additional rereadings of specific passages with text-dependent questions); or, for advanced readers—extension work with more challenging texts. Students should also engage in regular independent reading of self-selected texts.

2 The possible standards for the listed texts represent the full range and integration of the Common Core State Standards. While all the CCSS will not be formally assessed statewide in 2013-2014, all the CCSS should be taught, as the non-assessed standards are essential for students to meet the expectations of the assessed standards. Additional information and specific examples are available in the Assessment Guidance 2013-2014 document.

3 “Research” throughout this plan refers to student-led inquiry activities; these are extension tasks that allow students to make connections with texts. These activities should be done after students have read, written, and spoken about each individual text and demonstrated their understanding of the text. Additional reading and writing performance tasks with the texts are expected and indicated through the possible Reading and Writing Standards.

4 The possible standards for the listed texts represent the full range and integration of the Common Core State Standards. While all the CCSS will not be formally assessed statewide in 2013-2014, all the CCSS should be taught, as the non-assessed standards are essential for students to meet the expectations of the assessed standards. Additional information and specific examples are available in the Assessment Guidance 2013-2014 document.

5 The possible standards for the listed texts represent the full range and integration of the Common Core State Standards. While all the CCSS will not be formally assessed statewide in 2013-2014, all the CCSS should be taught, as the non-assessed standards are essential for students to meet the expectations of the assessed standards. Additional information and specific examples are available in the Assessment Guidance 2013-2014 document.

6 The possible standards for the listed texts represent the full range and integration of the Common Core State Standards. While all the CCSS will not be formally assessed statewide in 2013-2014, all the CCSS should be taught, as the non-assessed standards are essential for students to meet the expectations of the assessed standards. Additional information and specific examples are available in the Assessment Guidance 2013-2014 document.

5/22/13 SAMPLE DRAFT



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