English 1302. 858- english 1302. 480- spring 2012 Course Description



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English 1302.858-

English 1302.480-

Spring 2012
Course Description:

Continuation of Eng. 1301. Advanced techniques of expository and persuasive writing; critical thinking and analysis; essays, research, and presentation methods. This course covers various forms of argument. It will indulge in a study of critical thinking resulting in critical writing, thinking and speaking. The course will also include several papers and presentations that demonstrate skills in research and critical assessment of various topics. Prerequisite: Eng. 1301.


Course Goals:

By the end of this course, the student will:




  • Show an understanding of various genres of fiction, poetry, and drama.

  • Show an understanding of critical thinking resulting in critical writing.

  • Show an understanding of skills in research and literary criticism.



Instructor:

Lori Belanger, MA. Eng. Adjunct instructor. NCTC.

E-mail at lbelanger@nctc.edu or lbelanger@nisdtx.org or loribel3@gmail.com

Desk phone- 817-698-1264.



Course time and place:

Tuesday Evening- 6:00-9:00pm

Thursdays- 6:00-9:00pm

Northwest High School- room 2300.


Availability:

I am on the NHS campus Monday- Friday from 4:15-5:00 pm- in room 2300. Please make an appointment for tutorials. Also, I am available to help on line via e-mail.


Texts:

Kirszner, Laurie G., and Stephen R. Mandell,Introducing Practical Argument.,. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's 2011.

(ISBN # 0-312-54308-5)
Grades:

Letter grades are issued as follows-

90-100- A

80-89- B

70-79- C

60-69- D




  • Weekly Assignments 25%

  • Mid-term exam- 25%

  • Final exam- 25%

  • Group Presentations 25%



Plagiarism and Scholastic Integrity:

Scholastic dishonesty shall include, but not be limited to cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion. See Student handbook “Student Rights & Responsibilities: Student Conduct [FLB-(LOCAL)]” #18. Disciplinary Actions [Student Handbook, p. 164, #5] “when cheating, collusion, or plagiarism has occurred beyond any reasonable doubt, the instructor may give the student or students involved an “F” on a particular assignment or in the course. [See Scholastic Dishonesty FLB (LOCAL)] The instructor shall make a written report of the incident and of the planned action to his Department chair. The Department Chair shall report the incident and action to appropriate instructional dean who shall review the case, notify the student and, if necessary, take further action. This may involve either probation or suspension of the student or students in question. If such disciplinary action is deemed necessary, the Dean of Student Serviced shall be notified, and the action shall be taken through tat office.”


Attendance Policy:

General regulations regarding class attendance at North Central Texas College are:



  • Regular and punctual attendance is expected of all students in all classes for which they have registered.

  • All absences are considered to be unauthorized unless the student is absent due to sickness or emergencies that are approved by the instructor, or due to participation in an approved college-sponsored activity (which requires written approval from the appropriate instructional Dean).

  • The instructor is responsible for judging the validity of any reasons given for absence. Valid reasons for absence, however, do not relieve the student of the responsibility for making up required work.

  • Students will not be allowed to make up an examination missed due to absence unless they have reasons acceptable to the instructor. A student who is compelled to be absent when a test is given should petition the instructor, in advance if possible, for permission to postpone the exam.

  • Students may be dropped from a class by the Registrar upon recommendation of the instructor who feels the student has been unjustifiably absent or tardy a sufficient number of times to preclude meeting the course’s objectives.

  • Persistent, unjustified absences from classes or laboratories may be considered sufficient cause for College officials to drop a student from the rolls of the College.


Student Expectations

Students should remember that a dual credit course is a college course in all respects. The curriculum is the same as used on the college campus, and their responsibilities are the same as all other college students. The teaching methods are the same as on the college campus, and students will be expected to conduct themselves as college students. [See the NCTC Student Handbook] 

College courses sometimes deal with controversial issues or subject matter that high school courses may not address. This can provide new challenges for the dual credit student. Nonetheless, dual credit students should be prepared to participate in the same course an instructor teaches on the college campus.

All college students should expect to invest at least as much time out-of-class as in-class in reading, studying, and preparing for college course assignments. To be successful and ensure completion of out of class assignments, most students need to invest more time than this.

Students should pay careful attention to their instructor's system for assigning grades. Often the college grading system is different from the system their high school uses. If students do poorly on a test or assignment, they should not expect to repeat the work in order to improve their grade. Also, instructors may not allow students to do extra work to bring up a poor grade. The instructor’s grading system is covered in the course syllabus students receive at the beginning of the semester. If students have trouble in a dual credit course, it is their responsibility to ask the instructor what they need to improve in order to succeed in the class.
Student Responsibility

The instructor is available to answer questions about course materials or class policies. If students have any concerns about their performance in the course or are not sure of an assignment, the student should speak with the instructor.



Complaints

If there is a complaint about a course or an instructor, then students should first take the matter up with the instructor and try to resolve to the issue with him/her first.  If the student and instructor are unable to resolve the matter then the student will need to take the matter to the high school counselor, NCTC Dual Credit Coordinator, or the instructor’s department head.  Only if the matter cannot be resolved at the department level should the student make his/her appeal to the appropriate dean.  



Family Education Rights Privacy Act (FERPA)          

Students should see Section 1 of the Dual Credit Handbook for Students and Parents for a complete listing of FERPA rules.


Dropping a Course

If college students are doing poorly in the class, they may wish to withdraw. Students who withdraw from a college class before the official drop date will receive a W (no grade) on their transcript. When students withdraw from a class they may no longer attend the class or receive any college credit. Students may drop a dual credit course and return to a regular high school course at any time before the NCTC final drop date.  The dual credit instructor will notify students of the final drop date on the syllabus or the date can be obtained from the NCTC website. 



Dual credit students must contact their high school counselor before withdrawing from a class. This action will insure graduation requirements can still be met without the college course credit. There is no penalty on the students’ high school or college transcript for dropping a dual credit course.  Withdrawing from a class requires completion of the appropriate paperwork and doing so before the last date for course withdrawal.

Tutorial Assistance

Tutorial assistance is available to all students. These services can be accessed ONLINE or students can come to any on campus tutoring center during scheduled hours.



Library Resources

While the resources of the high school library may meet most of the research needs of dual credit students, students may access the NCTC system as well. Every NCTC student is given an ID number by the Admissions Office. All students can use this to access the full resources of the NCTC library databases.  Students may also come in during regular library hours on any of the NCTC campuses. Please remember, NCTC is an institution of higher education and the college library provides materials that support and supplement the educational process. No effort is made to either censor or filter any materials from its collections.


ADA Statement:

North Central Texas College does not discriminate on the basis of disability for admission or access to its programs. The College is committed to providing equal access to its students with disabilities by providing appropriate accommodations; a variety of services and resources are made available through the ACCESS Department. Students are responsible for notifying the ACCESS Department of their need for assistance, Students with documented disabilities, such as mobility impairment, hearing or visual impairment, leaning, and/or psychological disorders are eligible for services.


ACCESS Program:

The ACCESS Program provides accommodations for students who have a documented disability. A disability is anything that can interfere with learning, such as s learning disability, psychological challenge or physical illness or injury. Accommodations may include extra time on tests, tests in a non-distracting environment, note taker in class, etc. Contact your local NCTC campus for details.


EEOC Statement:

North Central Texas College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, or disability in the employment or the provision of services.


Calendar/Course Outline:
January-

Week 1 (17/19)

Course overview and introduction- discuss MLA format, select student groups 1-5 (the students will become familiar with the course framework, the workload, the expectations and with MLA formatting)

Lecture and model of what a good class presentation looks like- (the student will see an example of what the instructor is looking for regarding the reading assignments and the class presentations)


Week 2 (24/26)

Reading assignment #1 due with class discussions and (the students will have the concepts of the bottled water argument paper reinforced) Lecture over the next reading assignment; which is over violent media and entertainment. We will explore chapter 2 of the textbook.
Week 3 (31/2/2)

Group #1’s presentation on violent imagery

Individual responses due on Violent imagery. with class discussions and Lecture over the next reading assignment from chapter 3 which is the visual argument paper. (the students will be able to see the intricacies of visual rhetoric and look at several examples of well executed visuals in various forms of argument (the students will have the concepts of violent media reinforced via a peer presentation)
Week4 (7/9)

Written response due on MLK.

MLK’s use of ethos, pathos, and logos in his essay from chapter 4 “The Letter From Birmingham Jail” (pg 68) submitted electronically to loribel3@gmail.com by midnight the day of your scheduled class meeting.


Week 5 (14/16)

Group 2 presents on Visual argument

Group 3 presents on logical fallacies

Individual student presentations on the visual argument.

Lecture over the next reading assignment; which is chapter 5 on visual argument. (the students will be able to see how visuals play a significant role in argument)


Week 6 (21/23)

Group 4 presents on Rogerian and Toulmin logic

Group 5 presents on the oral argument

Paper on ind/ded logic due with class discussions and (the students will have the concepts of literary argument reinforced via a peer presentation) Lecture over Rogerian and Toulmin logical strategies for argument found in chapter 6 of the textbook.
Week 7 (Feb. 28-Mar. 1)

Individual oral arguments due on various topics

Review for the mid-term exam. (the student will be made familiar with the test content and format via a review document and presentation)


Week 8 (Mar.6, 8)

Mid-Term Exam over the first five reading assignments (the students will prove a level of mastery of the prior concepts covered)
Week 9 (Mar. 20, 22)

Group 1 presents the definition argument

The students will become familiar with the concepts found in Chapter 12 of the textbook which covers the definition argument. We will have group activities, and class presentations, discussions to reinforce these concepts. (the student will be able to identify how arguing via definition is effective)


Week 10 (Mar. 27, 29)

Group 2 presents the causal argument

Individual student presentations on the definition argument

The students will become familiar with the concepts found in Chapter 13 of the textbook which covers the definition argument. We will have group activities, and class presentations, discussions to reinforce these concepts. (the student will be able to identify how arguing via causal analysis is effective)


Week 11 (Apr. 3, 5)

Group 3 presents the evaluative argument

Paper on the causal chain due
The students will become familiar with the concepts found in Chapter 14 of the textbook which covers the evaluation argument. We will have group activities, and class presentations, discussions to reinforce these concepts. (the student will be able to identify how arguing via evaluative analysis is effective)
Week 12 (Apr. 10, 12)

Group 4 presents the proposal argument

Paper due on the evaluative argument

The students will become familiar with the concepts found in Chapter 15 of the textbook which covers the proposal argument. We will have group activities, and class presentations, discussions to reinforce these concepts. (the student will be able to identify how arguing via proposal analysis is effective)


Week 13 (Apr. 17, 19)

Group 5 presents the analogy argument

Individual student presentations on the proposal argument.

The students will become familiar with the concepts found in Chapter 16 of the textbook which covers the Analogy argument. We will have group activities, and class presentations, discussions to reinforce these concepts. (the student will be able to identify how arguing via analogy is effective)


Week 14 (Apr. 24, 26)

Review for the final exam. (the student will be made familiar with the test content and format via a review document and presentation)
Week 15 (Apr.1,3)

Study Week for the Final Exam
Week 16 (Apr. 8,10)

Final Exam


  • Please note that this document may change as events occur that are unforeseen or out of my control such as weather, illness, or administrative issues.


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