Elective Category Course Department



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Global

Global Aging

152:153:EXW


Social Work

Demographic factors that contribute to the world wide phenomena of population aging in context of WHO Active Aging and the United Nation's Principles for Older Persons frameworks.

None

None

Global

Studies in Complementary/Alternative Med 152:154:SCA

GHS

Topics vary; may include studies in mind-body medicine; complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); group of medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not considered to be part of conventional medicine; treatments used instead of standard ones (alternative treatments); nonstandard treatments used together with standard ones (complementary medicine); examples of CAM therapies (acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicines); approaches widely used in other parts of the world that may represent an important component of health care in a country (e.g., ayurvedic medicine in India).

None

None

Global

Understanding Health & Disease in Africa Subtitle: Building Cultural Competency for Working in the Field
152:155:SCA

GHS

This course challenges students in the health sciences to consider what they must learn in order to apply their professional skills in unfamiliar societies. Taking Africa as an example, it will lead students to think about how knowledge of culture, economies and history can enhance their ability to apply their skills in African nations. The course will use a wide variety of materials, including not only readings by historians and social sciences, but also videos and fiction by African writers. Among the themes to be covered are i) African environments and their challenges to human health, ii) relations between genders and generations in African societies, iii) the historical experience of Africans in precolonial, colonial and post-colonial periods, and iv) the causes and consequences of economic underdevelopment in Africa. In addition, the course will look at the ways in which Africans combine indigenous and biomedical therapies. It will examine healing institutions and conceptions of illness which are very old in Africa, and also the relatively recent development of biomedical health professions. It will also look at the lives of both traditional healers as well as African physicians and nurses.


None

None

Global

Global Health Seminar

Subtitle: Challenges to Child Health Globally

152:160:SCA


GHS

In 2011, according to the United Nations, 6.9 million children under the age of five died. The vast majority of these deaths occurred in low income countries, but there are still many children in high and middle income countries, including the US, who are ‘at the margins’.   They are at risk of abuse, neglect and sexual exploitation as well as facing higher exposure to disease associated with poverty and malnutrition.


None

None

Global

Health Care and Health Reforms in Russia 152:170:001

GHS

Societal changes and their continuing effect on the Russian health care system since 1991; guest lectures from public health, nursing, medicine, cultural anthropology.


None

None

Global

U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context

152:178:001

GHS

Historical and contemporary aspects of U.S. governmental planning and policy on a wide range of energy issues in global context.


None

044:019 (GEOG:1070), and 044:003 (GEOG:1020) or 012:008 (GEOS:1080).

Global

Hazards and Society

152:180:001


GHS

From Hurricane Katrina, to the 2010 Haiti earthquake, to the 2011 tsunami-induced nuclear meltdown in Japan, disasters are inflicting an ever-increasing toll on the health and wealth of nations and communities.  This course explores the impact and societal responses to natural and technological hazards.  Using case studies from around the world, we will focus on the relationship between extreme events, human behavior, disaster management, public policy, and technology to understand what makes people and places vulnerable to hazards.


None

None

Global

Health Exp. Immigrants/Migrants/Refugees

152:182:SCA


GHS

This interdisciplinary course explores the unique health concerns, challenges, and healthcare experiences of the diverse populations on the move around the world and new to this country.  It incorporates documentary materials and guest speakers experienced in responding to the health needs of these interesting individuals;  and assignments based on experiences outside the classroom.  Issues to be explored include four overlapping sections:  1.) Broad Overview--definitions, populations, and significant health challenges; 2.) Health risks and needs of specific sub-populations; 3.) Patterns of Public and Private Resources and Responses; 4.) Local Picture (Iowa and Midwest), programs, cases and concerns.


None

None

Global

Special Projects in Global Health

152:199:IND

GHS

In order to receive permission to register for this course, students must submit a preliminary proposal and approval form. More informaton is available at the Global Health Studies website.


None

None

Global

Health Insurance and Managed Care 152:217:001

GHS

History and theory of insurance, comparative health systems, health systems and networks, HMOs, public health insurance, care for uninsured; emphasis on public policy.


None

174:200 (HMP:5005)





Latino Culture












Latino Culture

Global Aging

152:153:EXW


Social Work

Demographic factors that contribute to the world wide phenomena of population aging in context of WHO Active Aging and the United Nation's Principles for Older Persons frameworks.

None

None

Latino Culture

Gender, Race and Class in the US


131:055

Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies

Focuses on three intersecting axes of power: gender, race, and class; how each of these categories complicates the other, so that each is understood as inseparable from the other. E.g. the color of gender, the gender of class, and the sexualities of race. In this course, we seek to increase our understanding of the inequities in our society and the consequences of those inequities for different communities and individuals within the nation.

CD

None

Latino Culture

Latin American Studies Seminar

130:176:001



LAS

This seminar explores urban cultures of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru by way of literature, journalism, and everyday language use.  This approach includes, first, a focus on storytelling as fundamental cultural activity, specifically personal stories situated within historical and political context.  That focus is then expanded to include journalistic storytelling about contemporary social forces, specifically violence in Colombia. Second, this large-scale emphasis on storytelling is joined to the details of everyday language use:  how people use linguistic resources  and cultural practices  to coordinate their actions, from the basic interactions (thanking, disagreeing, apologizing) to the profound (addressing hierarchy and political difference in public debate.)  Taught in English; some knowledge of Spanish is helpful.


None

None




Theory and Practice of

Cultural Diversity













Theory and Practice

American Deaf Culture

158:102:001




Amer Sign Language

Cultural practices, beliefs, values of the American deaf community. Taught in American Sign Language.

None

None

Theory and Practice

Issues in ASL and Deaf Studies


158:104:001

Amer Sign Language

Current issues in American Sign Language and the American deaf community, such as linguistics, culture, literacy.


None

None

Theory and Practice

History of the American Deaf Community

16A:104:SCA





History

In this course we will explore the creation of a distinct language and culture of Deaf people in America during the 19th and 20th centuries.  We will discuss how the meaning of deafness has changed in response to larger cultural and social changes in American history, and what effects these changes have had upon educational and social policies.  We will address questions such as why American Sign Language was suppressed for most of the 20th century, how the Deaf community maintained its language and culture in the face of persistent opposition, and why American Sign Language has again become, as it was in the nineteenth century, a subject of fascination in both academia and popular culture.  The instructor is Professor Douglas Baynton. 







Theory and Practice

Cultural Anthropology

113:003 (AAA, A10-A17)




Anthropology

A general introduction to sociocultural anthropology, the study of cultural diversity and social groups from around the world ranging from peasant farmers in the Andes to hunter-gatherers in the Kalahari Desert. Develop an understanding of the similarities and differences among these peoples, economies, social organization, worldview, and rituals of identity as well as an understanding of the ways culture expands human capacity for interaction and creativity and perpetuates inequality and self-destructive practice.

SocSci

None

Theory and Practice

Language, Culture and Communication

113:014:A92,A93

ANTH

This course considers language in the context of human social interaction and cultural diversity. It begins with an exploration of signs, illuminating the nature of language as a complex sign system that makes culture possible. We explore the similarities and differences between human language and animal communication and ask how language shapes the way we perceive and make sense of the world we live in. We then move to consideration of language in social interaction and even as a form of action itself. We interrogate the dynamics of everyday conversation and artful uses of language as performance. We ask how language practices shape and reflect social identities, how language becomes invested with social power and is implicated in relations of social domination, such as gender, class and race. There are no pre-requisites for this course. This course satisfies the Social Sciences General Education Requirement.

SoSci

None

Theory and Practice

Language and Society

103:011 (EXZ,AAA,A01,SCA,SCB.SCC, SCD)



Linguistics

This course is an introduction to sociolinguistics.  It focuses on the relationships between social and linguistic behavior.  Topics include various dialects, including social class distinctions, regional dialects, African-American English, and differences between the speech of males and females, as well as attitudes toward speakers of those dialects.


SS

None

Theory and Practice

Social Inequality

034:066


Sociology

Some form of social inequality has been found throughout history and exists in all societies today. The goal of the course is to understand the extent, causes and forms of inequality, the ability of society and individuals to change the degree of inequality and the importance of race, ethnicity and gender in understanding inequality.

CD

Soc majors only

Theory and Practice

Intercultural Communication

042:EX4


Communication

Culture defined as a system of taken-for-granted assumptions about the world that influence how people think and act; cultural differences that produce challenges and opportunities for understanding and communication; those differences from several theoretical perspectives; opportunities to examine culture and cultural differences in practical, experience-driven ways.

None

036:001 (COMM:1301), 036:005 (COMM:1305), 036:012 (COMM:1112) or 036:070 (COMM:1170), 036:017 (COMM:1117) or 036:030 (COMM:1130), and 036:068 (COMM:1168) or 036:074 (COMM:1174).






Issues of Class and Poverty












Class and Poverty

Gender, Race and Class in the US


131:055

Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies

Focuses on three intersecting axes of power: gender, race, and class; how each of these categories complicates the other, so that each is understood as inseparable from the other. E.g. the color of gender, the gender of class, and the sexualities of race. In this course, we seek to increase our understanding of the inequities in our society and the consequences of those inequities for different communities and individuals within the nation.


CD

None

Class and Poverty

Social Inequality

034:066


Sociology

Some form of social inequality has been found throughout history and exists in all societies today. The goal of the course is to understand the extent, causes and forms of inequality, the ability of society and individuals to change the degree of inequality and the importance of race, ethnicity and gender in understanding inequality.

CD

None

Class and Poverty

Gender and Society

034:018:001 & 002


Sociology

This course explores the nature of gender as a social construct that shapes our lives and the construction of society. Public discussions of gender, if they even occur, tend to frame gender differences as natural and rooted in biology. We will examine the ways in which societal influences shape our experiences and understandings of gender, ranging from the micro-level (individuals) to the macro- level (social structure). 

CD

None
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