Effective Term:  Subject Area Course Number: Philsphy 381 Cross-listing:  



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University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Curriculum Proposal Form #3



New Course



Effective Term: 
Subject Area - Course Number: Philsphy 381 Cross-listing:      

(See Note #1 below)


Course Title: (Limited to 65 characters) Philosophy of Gender and Race

25-Character Abbreviation: Phil. of Gender & Race

Sponsor(s): Philosophy & Religious Studies; Race and Ethnic Cultures

Department(s): Philosophy & Religious Studies

College(s): 

Consultation took place:  NA  Yes (list departments and attach consultation sheet)


Departments: Race & Ethnic Studies; Women's Studies

Programs Affected: Philosophy minor; Liberal Studies major/minor; Gender and Ethnic Studies Minor; Women's Studies Major/Minor 

Is paperwork complete for those programs? (Use "Form 2" for Catalog & Academic Report updates)

 NA  Yes  will be at future meeting


Prerequisites: Soph. level or consent of instructor
Grade Basis:  Conventional Letter  S/NC or Pass/Fail
Course will be offered:  Part of Load  Above Load

 On Campus  Off Campus - Location      

College:  Dept/Area(s): Philosophy & Religious Studies

Instructor: Crista Lebens

Note: If the course is dual-listed, instructor must be a member of Grad Faculty.
Check if the Course is to Meet Any of the Following:

 Technological Literacy Requirement  Writing Requirement

 Diversity  General Education Option: 

Note: For the Gen Ed option, the proposal should address how this course relates to specific core courses, meets the goals of General Education in providing breadth, and incorporates scholarship in the appropriate field relating to women and gender.


Credit/Contact Hours: (per semester)

Total lab hours: 0 Total lecture hours: 48

Number of credits: 3 Total contact hours: 48
Can course be taken more than once for credit? (Repeatability)

 No  Yes If "Yes", answer the following questions:

No of times in major:       No of credits in major:      

No of times in degree:       No of credits in degree:      


Proposal Information: (Procedures for form #3)

Course justification:

This is a philosophy course designed to investigate the construction of gender and race as enmeshed, intersecting social identities. The approach is based on the premise that the experience of gender and race, while separable analytically, often cannot be separated in experience. The course does focus on gender and race in isolation at times, but most often investigates their ‘coalescence.’ Despite calls by many feminists of color supporting it, very few philosophical texts take this approach, though the literature is beginning to grow. This course is a response to that ‘call.’


The course supports several programs: the Philosophy minor, the Women’s Studies major and minor, the Liberal Studies major and minor, and the newly formed minor in Gender and Ethnic Studies. Students signed up for the Gender and Ethnic Studies minor even before it was widely publicized. As a Special Topics course, Fall 2009 the course had an enrollment of 11 students, which is the norm for special topics courses in philosophy. The subject matter is significant in that few courses on campus address intersections of gender and race, though there is awareness of a need for such approaches.

Relationship to program assessment objectives:

Budgetary impact: This course will be taught with existing personnel and resources. The course will be offered once every two years in the fall. The instructor will teach one less section of Intro to Philosophy, and that section will be covered by other department faculty.

Course description: (50 word limit)

This course examines the philosophical assumptions underlying concepts of gender and race. Topics include: historical and contemporary arguments about race and gender as biological categories; the relationship between the use of these categories and the persistence of sexism and racism; and race and gender in theories of subjectivity.



If dual listed, list graduate level requirements for the following:

1. Content (e.g., What are additional presentation/project requirements?)


2. Intensity (e.g., How are the processes and standards of evaluation different for graduates and undergraduates? )


3. Self-Directed (e.g., How are research expectations differ for graduates and undergraduates?)




Course objectives and tentative course syllabus:
Course Objectives:

Students will become familiar with key concepts and issues in philosophical analyses of race and gender, and will develop skill in analyzing and evaluating arguments pertaining to these issues.




Bibliography: (Key or essential references only. Normally the bibliography should be no more than one or two pages in length.)
Key texts:

Alcoff, Linda. Visible identities: race, gender, and the self. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.


Lugones, Maria. Pilgrimages/Perigrinajes: theorizing coalitions against multiple oppressions. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.

Mills, Charles W. The Racial Contract. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997.

Oyěwùmí, Oyèrónkẹ́. The Invention of Women. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.

Pateman, Carole. The sexual Contract. Palo Alto, CA: Standford University Press, 1988.

Pateman, Carole, and Charles Mills. Contract and Domination. Boston: Polity, 2007.
Selected Library Holdings:

Alcoff, Linda. Visible identities: race, gender, and the self. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Bernasconi, Robert, and Sybol Cook. Race and racism in continental philosophy. Edited by Sybol Cook Robert Bernasconi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003.

Birt, Robert E., ed. The quest for community and identity: critical essays in Africana social philosophy. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002.

Butler, Judith. Undoing Gender. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Card, Claudia. Feminist Ethics. Lawrence, Kan.: University Press of Kansas, 1991.

Dawson, Michael C. Black visions: the roots of contemporary African-American political ideologies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Figueroa, Robert, and Sandra Harding. Science and other cultures: issues in philosophies of science and technology. New York: Routledge, 2003.

Friedman, Marilyn. Autonomy, gender, politics. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Garber, Linda. Identity poetics: race, class, and the lesbian-feminist roots of queer theory. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Jagger, Gill. Judith Butler: sexual politics, social change and the power of the performative. London; New York: Routledge, 2008.

Johnson, Clarence Shole. Cornel West & philosophy: the quest for social justice. New York: Routledge, 2003.

Julie K. Ward, Tommy L. Lott, ed. Philosophers on race: critical essays. Oxford; Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2002.

Keller, Evelyn Fox. Secrets of life, secrets of death: essays on language, gender and science. New York: Routledge, 1992.

Lugones, Maria. Pilgrimages/Perigrinajes: theorizing coalitions against multiple oppressions. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.

Mills, Charles W. Blackness visible: essays on philosophy and race. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1998.

Oliver, Kelly. Witnessing: beyond recognition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001.

Oyěwùmí, Oyèrónkẹ́. The Invention of Women. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.

Richard Delgado, Jean Stefancic. Critical race theory: an introduction. New York: New York University Press, 2001.

Simons, Margaret A. Beauvoir and the second sex: feminism, race. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999.

Tarrant, Shira. When sex became gender. New York: Routledge, 2006.

Thurer, Shari L. The end of gender: a psychological autopsy. New York: Routledge, 2005.

Yancy, George, ed. Cornel West: a critical reader. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2001.

Yancy, George, ed. What white looks like: African-American philosophers on the whiteness question. New York: Routledge, 2004.


Course Objectives and tentative course syllabus with mandatory information (paste syllabus below):

Philosophy of Gender and Race


Philsphy 381

Fall 2011
Instructor: Dr. Crista Lebens

Office: White 111



Office Hours: (not updated)

M: 10-10:45 and 12:45-2:00;

T, W, Th: 9:45-10:45


To be announced

and by appointment


Contact Info: x5269, lebensc@uww.edu

Email availability M-Th: response within approximately 24 hrs; F-Sun: n/a

Course Description:

This course examines the philosophical assumptions underlying concepts of gender and race. Topics include: historical and contemporary arguments about race and gender as biological categories; the relationship between the use of these categories and the persistence of sexism and racism; and race and gender in theories of subjectivity.


Course Objectives:

Students will become familiar with key concepts and issues in philosophical analyses of race and gender, and will develop skill in analyzing and evaluating arguments pertaining to these issues.


Required Texts:
Individual articles will be made available via D2L. Please print out each article, read it, and bring it to class the day we are assigned to discuss it.

Note: if you have difficulty accessing the D2L webpage or the articles, let me know right away so we can solve the problem and you can be prepared for class discussion.



Course Requirements:

Active Class Participation: (100 points) Philosophy and Women’s Studies courses rely on discussion. Each member of the class should be an active and informed participant. This means coming to class having read the assignment several times as necessary. The readings for each day give us a common set of ideas to foster discussion. Reflect on the readings and bring your responses and questions to class.
Requirements for participation:
Attendance is required. More than one unexcused absence will lower your final grade.

Absences will be excused for illness, family emergency, University-sponsored events which a student is required to attend for another course, and other situations over which the student has no control, at the discretion of the instructor. Absences will generally not be excused for pre-scheduled vacations to lovely locales, pre-scheduled appointments, computer/printer disasters, or other avoidable situations. Use your excused absence for such situations.


Participation, including attendance, is worth 100 points. If you fail to meet this requirement, you will lower your final grade by one letter.

To raise your participation grade, you must contribute to class discussion. Lack of participation will not count against you, nor will it raise your grade. I will explain this further in class on the first day. After that, if you have further questions feel free to discuss them with me.



Assignments

Short essay exam: This is a take home exam that reviews key concepts essential to the course.


Papers: Each paper will be approximately 4-6 pages long. Paper topics will be distributed about 14 days before the due date.
Research Project: Throughout the course you will be researching a current issue that pertains to gender and race. An example we will explore in class is the debates surrounding the nomination and subsequent confirmation of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the US Supreme Court. You will choose a current or recent event and analyze the gendered and raced components of it using concepts from the course. The bulk of the grade will be based on your written report. You will also present a summary of your research project to the class at the end of the semester.



Assignment

Points

Topic

due date

(not updated)

Short essay exam

100

Key terms: Oppression; Social construction of gender and race

Sep 21

Paper #1

250

Social Contract

Oct 5

Paper #2

250

Gender and Racialized Identities

Nov 18

Final Project

300

Research: Contemporary Issue

Final Exam Time



Late work

Papers are due at the beginning of class. Late papers will be docked one half-letter grade for every day late, including weekends.


Some notes on writing: All papers should be word-processed. Staple pages together. All written work in this course should be composed in intelligible sentences and paragraphs, with good word usage and decent spelling. In short, it should look as if you take your own work seriously and have some self-respect. You may use the first person pronoun, and you may use informal or ordinary language, including slang, so long as your use of language is appropriate and effective for saying what you have to say clearly and effectively.

Academic Honesty


The work you turn in for this class must be your work or credit must be given to the author whose work you use. This includes information you find on the internet! Consider the following definitions of academic dishonesty:

"Cheating means getting unauthorized help on an assignment, quiz, or examination . . . Plagiarism means submitting work as your own that is someone else's." (Barbara Gross Davis, 1993. Tools for Teaching, 300)


Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated and will result in disciplinary measures.

Grading Criteria

The following criteria will be used to evaluate all written work for this course. Each criterion is worth 20% of the grade for that assignment.


Each is worth 20% of the grade for the paper:

  1. Focus/Thesis

  2. Analysis/Interpretation

  3. Organization and Coherence

  4. Evidence and Documentation

  5. Language Use and Conventions

Consult the Guide to UWW Writing Standards for details regarding these criteria.


Grading Scale





Points

B+

867-899

C+

767-799

D+

667-699

F

0-599

A

933-1000

B

833-866

C

733-766

D

633-666

A-

900-932

B-

800-832

C-

700-732

D-

600-632


University Policies
The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is dedicated to a safe, supportive and non-discriminatory learning environment. It is the responsibility of all undergraduate and graduate students to familiarize themselves with University policies regarding Special Accommodations, Academic Misconduct, Religious Beliefs Accommodations, Discrimination and Absence for University Sponsored Events (for details please refer to the Undergraduate Bulletin; the Academic Requirements and Policies and the Facilities and Services sections of the Graduate Bulletin; and the “Student Academic Disciplinary Procedures [UWS Chapter 14]; and the “Student Nonacademic Disciplinary Procedures” [UWS Chapter 17]).

STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS SHOULD INFORM THE INSTRUCTOR


Philosophy of Gender and Race Reading Schedule (dates are not accurate)

Please read the assigned text for the day before the class meets.

This schedule is subject to change. Once changes have been announced in class or via D2L, you are responsible for keeping informed of them.

All readings will be available via D2L. Please make arrangements to print out each article well in advance of the due date.



Week 1

9/2

Course Intro

Week 2

9/9

Hip Hop and Hobbes: “Rap, Warfare, and Leviathan”

Week 3

9/14

Frye, “Oppression” Also consult study guide and concept tutors







9/16

(continued)

Week 4

9/21

Locke/U.S. Constitution (Essay exam: short concepts due)




9/22

Pateman “Sexual Contract”

Week 5

9/28

Mills “Racial Contract”




9/30

Pateman “Race, Sex, and Indifference”

Week 6

10/5

Mills “Intersecting Contracts”




10/7

Mills “Intersecting Contracts” continued

Week 7

10/12

Linda Martín Alcoff “The Metaphysics of Gender and Sexual Difference”

(Paper due: Soc. Contract)




10/14

Oyèrónké Oyĕwùmí, “Visualizing the Body: Western Theories and African Subjects.” Optional: preface to The Invention of Women

Week 8

10/19

Constructions of Race: Mills “But What Are You Really?”




10/21

Hoetink, “Race and Color in the Caribbean”

Week 9

10/26

Tiano, “Women, Work and Politics in Latin America”




10/28

(continued)

Week 10

11/2

María Lugones, “Hablando Cara a Cara




11/4

(continued)

Week 11

11/9

María Lugones, “Purity, Impurity, Separation”




11/11

(continued)

Week 12

11/16

Race Traitor Readings




11/18

Linda Martín Alcoff, Whiteness (Paper due: Gender and Racialized Identities)

Week 13

11/23

(Alcoff on Whiteness, continued)




11/25

Marilyn Frye, “White Woman Feminist”

Week 14

11/30

(continued)




12/2

Hip Hop and Hobbes Revisited, Bill Lawson, “Rap and Political Philosophy”

Week 15

12/7

Lionel K. McPherson’ “Halfway Revolution: From that Gansta Hobbes to Radical Liberals”




12/9

Course Wrap up

Week 16




Finals week: Projects due, final exam time



Revised 10/02 of




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