E wo/pbc/23/3 original: english date: june 4, 2015 Program and Budget Committee Twenty-Third Session Geneva, July 13 to 17, 2015


ANNEX V INDICATORS OF PCT OPERATIONS



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ANNEX V INDICATORS OF PCT OPERATIONS


PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR THE EXPECTED RESULT



“IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY AND SERVICE QUALITY OF PCT OPERATIONS”
General


  1. As background for the performance indicators for the expected result “improved productivity and service quality of PCT operations”, the evolution of the following factors need to be considered:




  • The PCT workloads;

  • The language distribution of those workloads;

  • The number of staff assigned to process those workloads; and

  • The level of automation.



Workloads


  1. The workloads are tracked on the basis of the yearly number of record copies received by the IB18.


Evolution of Record Copies by Medium of Filing




  • The IB received approximately 217,700 record copies in 2014, representing an increase of 7 per cent compared to 2013.

  • The share of fully electronic filing methods kept increasing in 2014 and now represents 91 per cent of total filings.



Language distribution


  1. One fundamental development driving change in the IB is the increasing language diversity of filings, resulting, in particular, from continued increased usage of the PCT System in East Asian countries.


Languages of Filing (all languages)



  1. As can be observed, while English accounts for the majority of filing, with 51.6 per cent of filings in 2014, the shares of Asian languages have increased over the past decade. The combined share of the PCT applications filed in Japanese, Chinese and Korean has increased from 29.5 per cent in 2009 to 34.5 per cent in 2012. This share has remained stable from 2012 to 2014. Zooming in on languages other than English provides the following picture:


Languages of Filing (all languages except English)



  1. The sharp increase of applications filed in Asian languages in the last five years put a considerable strain on the IB due to the limited number of staff resources able to work in these languages. Mitigation for this issue is automation of certain tasks and recruitment of staff able to work in these languages.

Staff

  1. The chart below shows the number of PCT Operations staff since 2001, in Full Time Staff Equivalent (FTSE  total number of full-time staff plus the full-time equivalent of part-time staff).


Number of Personnel in PCT Operations



  • The PCT Operations Division’s personnel further decreased in 2014.

Unit cost of processing an application


  1. The IB’s productivity in processing PCT applications can be measured by the unit cost of processing, defined as the average total cost of publishing a PCT application. Average total cost is determined by total direct PCT system expenditure (expenditure incurred by the IB in the administration of the PCT system and related Programs), plus a proportion of indirect expenditure on support and management activities (e.g., buildings and information technology, among others). Indirect costs are weighted to take into account only the share attributable to the PCT system. The unit cost thus includes the cost of all PCT activities, including translation, communication, management and others.




  1. The methodology to compute the unit cost was revised in 2013 in order to align it with other WIPO unit/union cost calculations and to better capture a fast changing environment. For example, the old method, which was designed in 2007, included a cost of storage (over 30 years) in warehouses, whereas paper filings (including PCT EASY filings) accounted for less than 10 per cent of filings in 2013. The 2012 PCT unit cost has been calculated using both methods. The 2012 unit cost amounted to 680 Swiss francs using the old method and to 712 Swiss francs using the new method. The 32 Swiss francs difference is due to the new method for allocating indirect costs.




  1. Formally, unit cost is defined as:





  1. The graphs below depict the evolution of the unit cost of processing from 2004 to 2012 using the old method and from 2012 to 2014 using the new method, including a breakdown of the contribution of direct and indirect costs.


Unit Cost of Processing a Published PCT Application


Old method

New method








  • The average cost of processing a published PCT application was 662 Swiss francs in 2014, representing a decrease of 8.3 per cent compared to 2013. This decrease is due to various efficiency measures including automation.




  • The average cost of processing a published PCT application calculated by the old method decreased by an average of 5 per cent per year from 1,042 Swiss francs in 2004 to 680 Swiss francs in 2012.


Productivity of formalities examination


  1. The definition of staff productivity is output (i.e., the number of PCT publications) divided by the number of staff for formalities examination.


Productivity of Formality Examination



  • Historically, productivity of formalities examination has increased, mainly due to automation which has permitted the processing of much larger workloads with less or equal staff.


Aggregate quality of formalities examination


  1. In order to measure the quality of the work performed by the IB in a simple and comprehensive manner, the IB has developed an aggregate quality index, calculated as the average of four lead quality indicators. Three of these indicators are based on the timeliness of key transactions: acknowledgement of receipt of the PCT application, publication, and republication. The fourth indicator reflects errors made during the processing of PCT applications.


Quality Index of Formalities Examination



  • The overall quality, as measured by the aggregate index, improved markedly from an average of 81 per cent in 2007 to 93.1 per cent in 2014.




  • The remarkable increase of the quality index in 2014 is mainly due to improved timeliness in performing formalities examination as well as reduced delays in republishing applications with the ISR. The delay in formalities examination and republication mainly explained the decrease of the quality index observed during the 2010–2013 period.



Timeliness of formalities examination


  1. This indicator reflects in more detail one of the components of the aggregate quality indicator, namely the time required by the IB to issue Form 301. This form is issued after the formality examination of the application has been completed. Applicants appreciate receiving this Form as soon as possible because it acknowledges receipt of the application at the IB and allows them to know whether their application has any formal defects.




Timeliness of publication


  1. This indicator reflects in more detail one of the components of the aggregate quality indicator, namely the time required by the IB to publish the application. Article 21 (2) (a) of the PCT states that the “… international publication of the international application shall be effected promptly after the expiration of 18 months from the priority date of that application.”



Timeliness of republication


  1. This indicator reflects in more detail one of the components of the aggregate quality indicator, namely the time required by the IB to republish the application with the ISR. Due to delays in the communication of ISRs by ISAs, a number of international applications are published without the ISR. When the ISR becomes available, the international application needs to be republished with the ISR as soon as possible, so as to complete the international publication.



Quality of translation


  1. Statistically calculated numbers of documents are selected at random from translations of abstracts and patentability reports prepared under the responsibility of the IB for quality control. The evaluation determines whether a translation is “acceptable” or “not acceptable”. This indicator aggregates the results of such quality control performed by the IB across all language combinations and document types. Relationships with any agencies that consistently have less than 80 per cent of their translations deemed “acceptable” are discontinued.


Quality of PCT Translation



Timeliness of report translation


  1. This indicator provides information on the timeliness with which patentability report translations are made available by the IB to applicants and Offices. The share of patentability report translations delivered at 30 months from the priority date of the international application has steadily increased since 2010. In 2014, 82.5 per cent of patentability report translations were delivered at 30 months from the priority date.


Timeliness of Report Translation


Quality of software development


  1. The quality of software development (QSD) indicator provides a measure of the quality of major software releases for eDossier and ePCT projects. The QSD reflects the share of the time spent delivering new functionality in the release (i.e. work) out of the total time spent (i.e. work + rework). Rework is the time spent correcting defective work that was detected in the production environment.




  1. Under this approach, development outputs that contain low levels of rework are deemed high quality as it reflects the extent of value added to the product through the delivery of new features.




  1. The QSD is defined as:





  1. In 2014, the quality of major releases, as defined by the QSD, was 94.3 per cent. This share is nearly five percentage points higher than in 2013.



Quality of Software Development


Information systems service levels


  1. The performance indicator entitled information systems service levels (ISSL) reflects the performance of the service provided by the PCT information systems service to users, based on its ability to meet agreed targets.




  1. This composite indicator is calculated using the weighted average of five target-based performance indicators19. Each indicator is expressed as the percentage of the target actually attained.




  1. In 2014, overall service level was 95.3 per cent towards meeting the target performance levels.



Information Systems Service Levels


Id

Performance Indicator

Short description

Target

Conditions

2013 Result

2014 Result

(1)

Incident resolution time

Working time (7am-7pm on WIPO working days) between a ticket being created and resolved.

Severity 1: 4 hours

Severity 2: 2 days

Severity 3: 5 days

Severity 4: 10 days



Production and Support tickets resolved by the support team

85.5%

88.8%

(2)

Document load time

elapsed time between receipt of document at IB and its availability in eDossier

8 hours

Documents loaded by a semi or fully automated process

80.0%

88.2%

(3)

Batch job processing success rate

100%

Batch jobs to be completed successfully by the close of business on the scheduled date

99.6%

99.5%

(4)

eDossier system availability

99%

7am-7pm on working days

100.0%

100.0%

(5)

ePCT system availability

99%

24 hours

100.0%

100.0%




Information systems service levels (ISSL)

Weighted average of the above indicators: (1): 20% (2): 20% (3) 20% (4) 20% (5) 20%.







93.0%

95.3%



Receiving Office at the International Bureau (RO/IB)
Filings


  1. This table presents PCT filings by the top ten receiving offices over the past five years to 2014. In principle, a PCT application is filed at the national patent office of the applicant’s home country or at a regional patent office acting for the applicant’s home jurisdiction. The IB is a competent receiving office (RO/IB) for applicants from all PCT contracting states. The evolution of the filings at the RO/IB, its ranking in terms of the number of filings among other receiving offices, as well as its market share can be observed in this table.





  1. In the Program and Budget 2014/15, the following two performance indicators were added for the RO/IB:


Timeliness of notification of international filing date


  1. This indicator reflects the time required by the RO/IB to issue Form 105. This form is issued after the international filing date has been accorded. Applicants appreciate receiving this form as soon as possible, because an international application has the effect of a regular national application in each designated State as of the international filing date, which date shall be considered to be the actual filing date in each designated State.


Timeliness of Notification of International Filing Date


 

Timeliness of transmittal of search copy


  1. This indicator reflects the time required by the RO/IB to transmit the search copies to the ISAs. The search copy is to be transmitted promptly after payment of the search fee, so that the ISA can establish the ISR within the deadlines stipulated by the PCT regulatory framework. Delays in paying the fee will delay the transmission of the search copies to the ISAs and therefore negatively impact upon the ability of ISAs to meet these deadlines.


Timeliness of Transmittal of Search Copy



ANNEX VI INDICATORS OF MADRID OPERATIONS


PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR THE EXPECTED RESULT



“IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY AND SERVICE QUALITY OF MADRID OPERATIONS”


  1. As background for the performance indicators for the expected result “improved productivity and service quality of Madrid operations”, the evolution of the following factors needs to be considered:




  • Madrid workloads;

  • Composition of those workloads;

  • Number of staff assigned to process those workloads;

  • Level of automation; and

  • Total cost of production.




  1. Incoming documents




  1. The International Bureau (IB) receives six different categories of documents, namely international applications, renewals, subsequent designations, modifications, decisions and corrections. The latest trend for each of these documents is presented below. Additional information on applications, such as their average number of classes and average number of words is also provided. For technical reasons, some indicators show data based on processed documents rather than on incoming documents. Backlogs in processing may therefore affect some indicators.


International applications




  • The IB received 47,885 applications in 2014, representing an increase of 2.3 per cent compared to 2013.

  • The numbers of applications received have increased continuously since 2010.


Distribution of applications by language of filing


  • In 2014, 80 per cent of all applications were filed in English. This share grew by 15 percentage points from 65 per cent in 2008 to 80 per cent in 2014.



Average number of designations per registration



  • An average 6.9 designations were made in applications registered in 2014.

  • The average number of designations per registration has remained almost unchanged since 2010.

Average number of classes per registration



  • On average, 2.5 classes were specified in all applications registered in 2014.


Average length of applications


  1. The length of an application is determined by the total number of words used by applicants to describe their mark, by the basic list of goods and services and by any accompanying limitations. These three elements are translated by the IB into two languages (English, French or Spanish).




  1. The length of applications has an impact on the workload of examiners, which includes classifying the goods and/or services in the application according to the Nice Classification.




  1. The average length of an application is determined by the total number of words in basic lists of goods and services, limitations and descriptions divided by the number of applications registered.




  • In 2014, the average length of an application was 239 words. This represents an increase of 12 per cent compared to 2013.

  • While certain aspects of the translation and classification work are automated, significant increases in the length of applications has a large impact on the workload of the IB.



Distribution of regular and irregular applications



  • The share of regular applications has remained more or less the same since 2011.


Renewals



  • In 2014, the IB registered 25,729 renewals, up 12 per cent from 2013.

  • Despite the increase in renewals between 2009 and 2014, the numbers of renewals processed manually have remained relatively stable. In 2014, 59 per cent of renewals were processed automatically.

Subsequent Designations




  • In 2014, the IB recorded 17,316 subsequent designations, down 2.5 per cent from 2013.

  • In 2014, a new web form called E-Subsequent Designation was made available to applicants. This electronic form enabled the IB to process 14 per cent of all subsequent designations automatically.



Modifications



  • In 2014, the IB received 38,817 requests for modification, up 5.5 per cent from 2013.

Decisions



  • In 2014, the number of decisions registered decreased by 0.3 per cent compared to 2013, totaling 521,208. The number of decisions processed has rapidly increased since 2010.

  • In 2014, 62 per cent of decisions were processed automatically. The majority of decisions have been processed automatically since 2011.


Corrections



  • In 2014, the IB recorded approximately 6,000 corrections. This represents an increase of 17 per cent compared to 2013.

  1. Total workload




  1. The total workload represents the weighted total number of documents processed by the IB. All six categories of documents are included (applications, renewals, subsequent designations, modifications, decisions and corrections).




  1. As processing these types of documents do not require equal resources, they are each weighted differently. According to this weighted system, during the time required to process an international application, an examiner can process 1.6 renewals, 1.8 subsequent designations, 1.8 modifications or 10 decisions. Similarly, during the time required to process an international application, an employee involved in the automation process can be deemed to process 17 documents.




  • In 2014, the total workload remained stable compared to 2013. Applications, decisions and modifications represented nearly 80 per cent of the total workload.

  • Between 2011 and 2013, the workload increased sharply, mainly due to the increasing number of decisions.



  1. Medium of Transmission of Incoming Documents




  • In 2014, 66 per cent of all incoming documents were transmitted electronically to the IB.

  • The share of documents transmitted electronically has been stable since 2012.




  1. Processing


Total cost of production


  1. The total cost of production has direct and indirect components. Direct costs reflect expenditure incurred by the IB in administering the Madrid System (such as management, translation and registration). Indirect costs reflect expenditure for supporting activities (such as those associated with buildings and information technology). Indirect costs are weighted to take into account only the share attributable to the Madrid System.



  • The total cost of production is estimated at 41.8 million Swiss francs in 2014. This represents a slight increase of 0.1 per cent compared to 2013.




  • In 2014, the direct costs accounted for 61 per cent of total costs.



Unit cost


  1. The IB’s efficiency in processing transactions can be measured by the unit cost, defined as the average cost of producing one unit of output.




  1. As the IB registers new applications and maintains existing registrations, it is relevant to have a unit of output which includes a set of transactions. Two unit cost indicators are presented below using two different units of output.




  1. As part of the IB’s efforts to continuously refine the methodology for calculating unit costs, the methodology has been revised in the Program and Budget 2016/17 to reflect more accurately the cost of processing Madrid workloads at the IB:




  • The methodology for calculating direct and indirect Madrid costs have been aligned with the methodologies for calculating PCT and the Hague unit costs.




  • A weighted system has been introduced to better approximate the actual work required to process the six categories of documents, taking into account that certain of these documents are more labor-intensive than others.20




  • The first unit cost has been redefined to include only new international registrations and renewals (the unit cost in the Program and Budget 2014/15 also included subsequent designations). The rationale for removing subsequent designations as a component of this unit cost is a sharper focus on the core Madrid outputs, namely the international registration and its renewal. All other Madrid transactions (subsequent designations, modifications, decisions and corrections) can be considered secondary to these two core transactions. Furthermore, there is no real justification for including one of these secondary transactions as a component of unit costs, while not including the others.




  • The second unit cost is based on the number of documents inscribed in the register rather than the number of inscriptions due to the different levels of efforts required to process the various documents.




  1. For ease of comparison, the graphs below depict the evolution of the two unit costs from 2008 to 2014 using the old methodology and from 2012 to 2014 using the new methodology, including a breakdown of the contribution of direct and indirect costs.


Unit cost per new/renewed international registration


  1. New international registrations consist of applications that are registered within a given year, and renewed international registrations consist of existing registrations that are renewed within a given year. Combined, these two types of transactions reflect the core business of the IB.




  1. As processing these two types of transactions do not require equal resources, they are each weighted differently. 21 The unit cost is calculated by dividing the total cost of production by the number of new/renewed international registrations.




Old method

New method








  • The average cost of processing a new/renewed international registration was 837 Swiss francs in 2014. This represents an increase of 2.6 per cent compared to 2013. The increase was mainly due to a processing cost that remained relatively stable, combined with a decrease of 4.5 per cent in the number of international applications registered.


Unit cost per document inscribed in the register


  1. The documents inscribed in the register correspond to the total volume of workload (see “Total volume of workload” above).




Old method

New method








  • The average cost of inscribing a document in the register increased slightly from 320 Swiss francs in 2012 to 322 Swiss francs in 2014.



  1. Productivity of examination




  1. The definition of examination productivity is the number of new/renewed international registrations processed by examiners divided by the number of personnel involved in examination. The number of personnel includes fellows, interns and external contractors.





  • The productivity of examination remained relatively stable in 2014 compared to 2013.



  1. Personnel





  • The number of staff has remained relatively stable since 2010, while the number of flexible resources has increased from 1 in 2012 to 12 in 2014.

  • Personnel of outsourcing companies not working on WIPO premises are not included in this indicator.




  1. Pendency




  1. The average pendency for each of the six transactions performed by the IB is shown below. The pendency is calculated from the date a document is received to the date it is inscribed.



















  • Compared to 2013, the average pendency in 2014 increased for applications, corrections, modifications and subsequent designations. The average pendency time for renewals remained stable, whereas that for decisions decreased for the second consecutive year.

  • Improving and stabilizing pendency across all transactions is a major objective of the IB.

ANNEX VII INDICATORS OF THE HAGUE SYSTEM OPERATIONS


PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR THE EXPECTED RESULT



“IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY AND SERVICE QUALITY OF THE HAGUE OPERATIONS”



  1. As background for the performance indicators for the expected result “improved productivity and service quality of the Hague operations”, the evolution of the following factors needs to be considered:




  • The Hague System workloads;

  • The composition of those workloads;

  • The level of automation; and

  • The resources assigned to cope with the workload.




  1. The International Bureau (IB) receives four main types of documents, namely international applications, renewals, changes and decisions. The latest trend for each of these documents is presented below. Additional information on the applications received, such as their average number of designs, are also provided. For technical reasons, the indicator on the irregularities issued shows data based on processed documents rather than on incoming documents.


I. Incoming Documents

Applications received



  • In 2014, the IB received 2,924 international applications, down 2.2 per cent from 2013. In 2013, applications received sharply grew by 15 per cent.

  • In 2014, 89 per cent of applications were filed electronically. The share of electronic filings increased by 10 percentage points from 2011 to 2014, from 79 per cent in 2011 to 89 per cent in 2014.


Average number of designs per application



  • In 2014, an application contained, on average, nearly five designs. Between 2011 and 2014, the average number of designs per application varied between 4.5 and 5 designs.



Average number of designations per application



  • In 2014, an application contained, on average, nearly five designations.


Trend of irregularities in applications

  1. Irregularities in applications are grouped among the ten categories shown below.



  • In 2014, the IB identified 1,557 irregularities in applications, down 14 per cent over 2013.

  • Despite this sharp decrease, the irregularities related to product indications increased for the third consecutive year. Together with irregularities of payment, they nearly accounted for half of total irregularities in 2014.


Renewals



  • The number of renewals decreased for the second consecutive year to 2,703 renewals in 2014. This represented a 5 per cent drop on 2013.

  • Since 2013, a majority of renewals were processed automatically. They accounted for 60 per cent of total renewals in 2014

Changes



  • Applicants requested 1,063 changes in international registrations in 2014, up 8 per cent from 2013.


Decisions



  • The number of decisions received in 2014 increased by 10 per cent, to 3,169 decisions.

  • Between 68 per cent and 72 per cent of decisions were processed automatically since 2011.


II. Total workload


  1. The total workload represents the weighted total number of documents received at the IB. All four categories of documents are included (applications, renewals, changes and decisions).




  1. As processing these types of documents does not require equal resources, they are each weighted differently. According to this weighting, during the time required to process an international application, an examiner can process eight renewals, four changes or four decisions. Similarly, during the time required to process an international application, an employee involved in the automation process can be deemed to process 13 documents.



  • In 2014, the total workload remained stable compared to 2013. In 2014, applications alone represented 76 per cent of the total workload.

  • Between 2011 and 2013, the increase in workload was mainly due to the increase in the number of applications received.


III. Cost of Processing
Total cost of production


  1. The total cost of production is the total Hague System expenditure, plus a proportion of expenditure on support and management activities. It has direct and indirect components. Direct costs reflect expenditure incurred by the IB in administering the Hague System.22 Indirect costs reflect expenditure for supporting activities (such as buildings and information technology). Indirect costs are weighted to take into account only the share attributable to the Hague System.




  • The total expenditures related to the processing of the Hague System are estimated at 5.7 million Swiss francs in 2014. This represents a decrease of 5.7 per cent on 2013. Direct and indirect costs have decreased, by respectively 8.1 per cent and 2 per cent.

  • In 2014, the direct costs accounted for 60 per cent of total expenditures.


Unit cost


  1. The IB’s efficiency in processing transactions can be measured by the unit cost, defined as the average cost of producing one unit of output.




  1. As the IB registers new applications and maintains existing registrations, it is relevant to have a unit of output which includes a set of transactions. Two unit cost indicators are presented below using two different units of output.




  1. As part of the IB’s efforts to continuously refine the methodology for calculating unit costs, the methodology has been revised in the Program and Budget to reflect more accurately the cost of processing Hague workloads at the IB.




  1. The revisions in question are the following:



  • The methodology for calculating direct and indirect costs for the Hague have been aligned with the methodologies for calculating PCT and Madrid unit costs.

  • A weighted System has been introduced to better approximate the actual work required to process the four categories of documents, taking into account that certain of these documents are more labor-intensive than others.23

  • The first unit cost has been redefined to include designs contained in new international registrations and in renewals (the unit cost in the Program and Budget 2014/15 included only designs contained in new international registrations). The rationale for adding designs contained in renewals as a component of this unit cost is a sharper focus on the core Hague outputs, namely the international registration and its renewal.

  • The second unit cost is based on the number of documents processed and recorded in the register rather than the number of recordings due to the different levels of efforts required to process the various documents.




  1. For ease of comparison, the graphs below depict the evolution of the two unit costs from 2008 to 2014 using the old methodology and from 2012 to 2014 using the new methodology, including a breakdown of the contribution of direct and indirect costs.


Unit cost per new/renewed design


  1. New designs consist of designs in international applications that are registered within a given year, and renewed designs consist of existing designs in international registrations that are renewed within a given year. Combined, designs contained in these two types of transactions reflect the core business of the IB.




  1. As processing designs contained in these two types of documents do not require equal resources, they are each weighted differently.24 The unit cost is calculated by dividing the total cost of production by the number of new/renewed designs.




Old method

New method







  • The average cost of processing a new/renewed design was of 366 Swiss francs in 2014, down 12.8 per cent from 2013. This decrease was mainly due to a decrease of 5.7 per cent of the cost of production combined with an increase of 8.2 per cent of the number of new/renewed designs.


Unit cost per document recorded in the register


  1. The documents recorded in the register correspond to the total workload (see “Total workload” above).




Old method

New method








  • The average cost of recording a document in the register decreased to 1,483 Swiss francs in 2014. This is due to the decrease of 5.7 per cent of the cost of production.



III. Timeliness to process international applications

  1. This indicator reflects the time required by the IB to process regular applications. The timeliness is calculated between the time elapsed between the date of receipt of an application and the date it was registered.



  • The share of applications processed within less than one week constantly increased since 2011, to 45 per cent of applications in 2014.

  • In 2014, 85 per cent of applications were processed within 2 weeks from the date of receipt at the IB.

ANNEX VIII FUNDS IN TRUST RESOURCES POTENTIALLY AVAILABLE FOR PROGRAMMING




Table 19. Funds in Trust Potentially Available for Programming in 2016/171

(in thousands of Swiss francs)

1The figures do not include interest and exchange rate adjustments. It should also be noted that these funds generally provide for activities spanning a period of time exceeding or overlapping a single biennium, as income is received and expenditure incurred.
2These figures are purely indicative and are based on previous funding patterns. They do not represent Member States' commitments except in those cases where the FIT Agreement includes such a commitment.
3Annual contributions vary and fluctuations have been observed from one year to another.
4Republic of Korea (Education) - Expected Balance end 2015 takes into account encumbrances and obligations
.

ANNEX IX ANNUAL BUDGET TABLES FOR IPSAS REPORTING




  1. At the forty-third session of the Assemblies from September 24 to October 3, 2007, Member States approved the principle of the adoption by WIPO of IPSAS by 2010 (reference documents A/43/5 and A/43/16). This approval was related to the United Nations system-wide initiative endorsed by the General Assembly (A/RES/60/283(IV)I) to replace the existing United Nations Systems Accounting Standards (UNSAS) with IPSAS, which are internationally recognized. Accordingly, WIPO’s financial statements from the year 2010 are prepared in accordance with IPSAS.




  1. WIPO’s budget continues to be adopted by the Assemblies on a biennial basis. In compliance with IPSAS, the Organization must present financial statements on an annual basis. For this purpose, annual budget figures are provided for both income and expenditure.




  1. It is recalled that, within the context of the approval of the 2010/11 Program and Budget, the Member States approved the methodology for the annual presentation for WIPO’s biennial approved budget. The table below provides the estimated annual income amounts in accordance with this methodology for the 2016/17 Program and Budget.


Table 20. Annual Income 2006-2017

(in millions of Swiss francs)


*previously, Interest Income (up to the 2014/15 biennium)

Note: Lisbon fee income (2014/15 budgeted estimate: 8,000 CHF; 2016/17: 30,000 CHF)



  1. In respect of WIPO’s 2016/17 expenditure budget, a 50/50 split has been applied to the biennial non-personnel budget figures in order to establish the annual budget view. The personnel budget has been split on an annual basis based on the calculated costs for the two years respectively. The table below provides the annual expenditure amounts accordingly.



Table 21. Annual Expenditure 2006-2017

(in millions of Swiss francs)

*previously, Travel and Course Fellowships (up to the 2014/15 biennium)
**Contractual Services were restated for years 2004-2009 to include SSAs due to the change introduced in April 2010
***previously, included under Operating Expenses (up to the 2014/15 biennium)

ANNEX X 2016/17 BUDGET BY EXPECTED RESULT AND PROGRAM





ANNEX X (CONT.)



ANNEX XI 2016/17 BUDGET BY EXPECTED RESULT


(in thousands of Swiss francs)


Annex XI cont.


Annex XI cont.


ANNEX XII WIPO ORGANIGRAM







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