Duration: 5 weeks 30 X 55 mts lessons



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Aldridge SHS Year 10 HISTORY Unit 4 - The Move to War

DURATION: 5 weeks 30 x 55 mts lessons


Topic A Student Task:

By referring to primary and secondary sources, assess the validity of the following statement on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour.


STATEMENT

In 1941, without any warning, Japan made an unprovoked attack on the United States navy at Pearl Harbour. It was a masterful, though incomplete, tactical achievement.




Topic B Student Task:

Refer to primary and secondary sources to develop an hypothesis to the following question.


Why did Japan attack Pearl Harbour and set its nation on a war path with America?




LEARNING GOALS GENERAL

Success Criteria

Students able to



Resources

Week 1

Learning Goal 1

Acquire K&U of the conflicting interests between America and Japan in the Asia pacific region.

* Two economic and military powers in conflict

* Both after strategic and economic advantage

* Growth of dictatorships in Europe



Identify Key Individuals

Analyse a Political Cartoon

Understand the relationship between the Pacific War to events in Europe

Hypothesise about similarities between Germany, Italy and Japan eg Military solutions sought for domestic problems, Violent response, Rise of police power, The Great depression, Imperialism, Civilian Government loses control.



Key individuals
Text - Contested Spaces – Conflict in the Pacific

Pages 20 to 32

PP Japan 1919 – 1940
Manchuria 1931

Overview



Week 2

Learning Goal 2

Acquire K&U of the dilemma for the USA 1919 – 1940


ISOLATIONIST OR INTERVENTIONALIST


Understand USA’s involvement in the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations

Debate the pros and cons of an Isolationist Policy




Text - Contested Spaces – Conflict in the Pacific

Pages 33 to 46

PP USA 1919 – 1940


Week 3-5

Learning Goal 3

Review the essential elements of a high quality analytical essay
Acquire K&U of

Essay structure

Referencing – Endnotes

Annotated Bibliography

Reflective Journal



Note Taking bases on an analysis of the Question

Did Japan attack without Warning?

Was the attack unprovoked?

Was it a masterful tactical achievement?

Was the attack a complete success?
Measured by senior Modern History criteria

PLANNING & USING A HISTORICAL

RESEARCH PROCESS
FORMULATING HISTORICAL

KNOWLEDGE THROUGH CRITICAL

INQUIRY
COMMUNICATING HISTORICAL

KNOWLEDGE

Text - Contested Spaces – Conflict in the Pacific


Web sites
Exemplars

Essay structure A

Essay structure B

Notes Topic A

Referencing – Endnotes

Annotated Bibliography

Reflective Journal


LEARNING GOALS GENERAL

Success Criteria

Students able to



Resources

Week 6

Learning Goal 4

  • K&U of the Japanese occupation of Southeast Asia by speed reading chapter 5 in one lesson.

  • K&U of the concept of Imperialism and its impact on South others.




Complete an overview of a 14 page chapter using small group speed reading.

Students identify the key issue.

Identify key issues related to occupation, resistance, imputes for independence, treatment of alien POWs


Chapter 5 pages 77 to 92

Contested Spaces – Conflict in the Pacific




Week 7

Learning Goal 5

Critical review how this event has been portrayed in the media.




Write a review

Movies

Pearl Harbour – Controversial – Love triangle – sixtieth anniversary of the attack – wrapped in nationalism – of little historical value

Tora Tora – 1970 – The most balanced / objective movie made on this historical event

An Original Newsreel About the Bombing of Pearl Harbor


http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/249620/an-original-newsreel-about-the-bombing-of-pearl-harbor/


Week 7

Learning Goal 5

Review of Topic


Students reflect on their research skills and the reliability of the sources they used and the conclusions they developed.

The Pacific War Historical Society 

http://www.pacificwar.org.au/pearl_harbor.html


Extension Unit

Guiding Questions



  1. What accounts for the growing hostility that had developed between the United States and Japan by the early 1930s?

  2. In its approach to the Sino-Japanese conflict of the 1930s, did the United States place itself on a path to war?

  3. Was the "southern advance" a reasonable attempt to address to Japan's international dilemma, or was it a reckless step toward war?

  4. Was war between the United States and Japan inevitable after September 1941?




LEARNING GOALS GENERAL

Success Criteria

Students able to






Context

The Growth of U.S.–Japanese Hostility, 1915–1932

Learning Goal 1

Using contemporary documents, students in this lesson will explore the rise of animosity between the United States and Japan.


Explain how Japan's ambitions in China conflicted with the American concept of the "Open Door."

Discuss the means by which the United States and Japan sought peaceful means of resolving their differences.

Articulate why U.S. trade and immigration policies angered the Japanese.

Explain the importance of the Manchurian Incident of 1931, and the American response to it, for the deterioration in U.S.–Japanese relations.




Response to the following question:

Why did Japan invade Manchuria in 1931, and why did the United States consider this a matter of concern?

Locate the following on a blank map of East Asia:

China Japan Manchuria

Identify and explain the significance of the following terms:

"open door"

"Twenty-One Demands

"Lansing–Ishii Agreement

Nine-Power Pact

"non-recognition"







LEARNING GOALS GENERAL

Success Criteria




Activity 1

LG students will look at four documents pertaining to U.S. and Japanese policies in China. By examining these, and answering questions about them, they should gain an understanding of why tensions developed between the two countries.








Learning Goal 2

Examine the overall principles which underlay both Japanese and American foreign policy in the mid- to late-1930s.

Context

America and the Sino-Japanese Conflict, 1933–1939











Learning Goal 3

Examine primary documents and maps to discover why Japan embarked on its "southern advance."


Context

Japan's "Southern Advance" and the March toward War, 1940–1941











Learning Goal 4

Students put themselves in the shoes of U.S. and Japanese diplomats in the final months of 1941.

Context

The Failure of Diplomacy, September–December 1941










In this unit, students:

Learning Goals

Explain how Japan's ambitions in China conflicted with the American concept of the "Open Door."

Discuss the means by which the United States and Japan sought peaceful means of resolving their differences.

Articulate why U.S. trade and immigration policies angered the Japanese.
Explain the importance of the Manchurian Incident of 1931, and the American response to it, for the deterioration in U.S.- Japanese relations.

Explain why Japan went to war against China during the 1930s.

Articulate the reasons why the United States believed that its interests were at stake in East Asia.

Discuss how the United States responded to developments in the Sino-Japanese War.

Assess the effectiveness of U.S. foreign policy in East Asia in the 1930s.

Define what Japanese leaders meant by the "southern advance," and explain why they opted to pursue it.

Articulate the U.S. response to the "southern advance," and assess whether it was a reasonable one.

Explain why Tokyo decided in September 1941 to prepare for war against the United States.

List and explain the issues that divided the United States and Japan in the fall of 1941.

Articulate the reasons why Japan chose to go to war against the United States.

Assess the overall effectiveness of U.S. foreign policy during this period.

BLOOMS TAXONOMY

Blooms Level

Description

Creating

Putting together ideas or elements to develop an original idea or engage in creative thinking.

Evaluating

Judging the value of ideas, materials and methods by developing and applying standards and criteria

Analysing

Breaking information down into its component elements

Understanding

Understanding of given information

Skills and Key Concepts for National Curriculum

Chronology, terms and concepts

Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places (ACHHS164)

Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS165)

Historical questions and research

Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform historical Inquiry (ACHHS166)

Evaluate and enhance these questions (ACHHS167)

Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS168)



Analysis and use of sources

Identify the origin and purpose and context of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS169)

Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument (ACHHS170)

Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS171)



Perspectives and interpretations

Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS172)

Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own) (ACHHS173)

Explanations and communication

Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use evidence from a range of sources that are referenced (ACHHS174)

Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS175)

Key Concepts of historical understanding are:

Evidence

Information obtained from historical sources used to construct an explanation or narrative, to support a hypothesis, or prove or disprove a conclusion.



Continuity and change

Continuities are aspects of the past that have remained the same over certain periods of time. Changes are events or developments from the past that represent modifications, alterations and transformations.



Cause and effect

The relationship between a factor or set of factors (cause/s) and consequence/s (effect/s). These form sequences of events and developments over time.



Perspectives

A point of view or position from which events are seen and understood, and influenced by age, gender, culture, social position and  beliefs and values.



Empathy

An understanding of the past from the point of view of the participant/s, including an appreciation of the circumstances faced, and the motivations, values and attitudes behind  actions.



Significance

The importance that is assigned to particular aspects of the past, such as events, developments, movements and historical sites, and includes an examination of the principles behind the selection of what should be investigated and remembered.



Contestability

Debate about particular interpretations of the past as a result of the nature of available evidence and/or different perspectives





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