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and this tradition is only two steps from John to the writer,

and that through sons who lived with their parents for

thirty-five years or more. Cornwallis camped two days within

a quarter of a mile from his home, and destroyed everything

on the premises. His brother William was in the service.
Rankin, John and Robert. Sons of George and grandsons of

Buffalo Men in the Revolutionary War 199


Robert, Sr. Their father died in 1761. John married Rebecca

Rankin in 1786. Robert was a pensioner, No. W. 5664 in

office at Washington.
Rankin, John, Robert and William. Sons of Robert and grand-

sons of Robert, Sr. For Robert, see Life of Caldwell, page

234. William was trading in land in 1782, and John in 1784.

They must have served in the war.


Rankin, William (1744-1804). Son of Joseph, of Delaware.

Was in the Alamance battle. Colonial Records, Vol. 8, page

613. Cornwallis camped on his farm. Caruthers' History,

Vol. 2, page 98. He was a staunch Whig. Life of Caldwell,

page 225. Pensioner. Colonial Records, Vol. 22, page 82.
Ross, Henry, James and John. Appear to have been brothers.

Henry was a member of Capt. Robert Bell's company. Min-

utes of Session. Henry moved to that territory in Tennessee

reserved for North Carolina soldiers. John died in 1791,

leaving a family of nine children. All three were of the

right age and must have been in the service.


Russell, Robert and AVilliam, Appear to have been brothers and

located here about 1775. William was in Capt. Robert Bell's

company. Minutes of Session. Robert was also of right age

for military duty, and both must have been in the war.


Ryan, John, Robert and William. Sons of John, and were all of

right age. For William, see files of Patriot in Public Library,

March 11, 1843. For John, see Colonial Records, Vol. 22,

page 422. Robert must have been in the service also.


Ryan, James and Patrick. Sons of James and grandsons of

Edward. For Patrick, see Colonial Records, Vol. 15, page

728. James moved to that district in Tennessee reserved for

North Carolina soldiers.


Scott, Samuel, Jr. Son of Samuel, Sr. Died or was killed during

the war. He was right age for military service.


Scott, William. Son of Samuel, Sr. Was a member of Capt.

Robert Bell's company. Minutes of Session, 1777.


Smith, John, William, Robert, Samuel and Andrew. Sons of

Robert, Sr., who located here in 1755. Were all of the right

age for military service. There are so many Smiths in the

Colonial Records and with the same given name, that it is

difficult to say who is who, and to give the references.
Smith, John, William and Thomas. Sons of John and grand-

200 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


sons of Robert, Sr. Were old enough for service. John

(1761-1822) ; William died in 1833- — he was a pensioner.

Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina, page 435. Thomas

received a grant of land in Tennessee for war service, and

was granted fifteen pounds by the county court for the loss

of a leg at Eutaw Springs in 1781. Other grandsons of

Robert, Sr., may have been in war service.
Spruce, William. A young man ; located here in 1765, and mar-

ried a daughter of John Nicks. He was right age for mili-

tary duty.
Starratt, James. Located here in 1778, and was right age for

military duty. Colonial Records, Vol. 10, page 519.


Thompson, Samuel. Son of Robert, who was killed at Battle of

Alamance. Caruthers' History, Vol. 2, page 99.


Touchstone, Jonas. Was trading in lands on North Buffalo in

1775, so was of right age for military duty.


Trousdale, William. Located on North Buffalo in 1764 and

must have been in the war. He moved to Tennessee and a

county there is named Trousdale, perhaps for him.
Unthank, Allen and John. Sons of Joseph. Allen has his taxes

remitted by the county court because of his service in the

army. John was trading in land in 1778, and so was right

age for military duty.


White, John. Married Jane Paisley in 1762, sister of Col. John

Paisley. Commissioner of Army Supplies. Colonial Records,

Vol. 14, page 449.
AVliite, James. Nephew of John. Located here about the same

time John did, just before the war. He moved to Tennessee

after the war,
Wilson, Andrew (1752-1834). James, William, David and John.

Sons of Andrew, Sr. Andrew was the captain of a company.

Colonial Records, Vol. 22, page 112. The other four brothers

were of military age and must have been in the service.


Wright, Robert. Lived on Reedy Fork, and was in Captain

Robert Bell's company. Minutes of Session.


The writer is satisfied there are others whose names should

be added to this list, but he has not as yet been able to get a

proper line on them.
Some of the young men were killed in service, and when

their father made his will later their names of course were not

mentioned.

Buffalo Men in the Revolutionary War 201


The names of many of these given here never appear on any

record after the war, and they must have been killed or died

during the war.
These heroes of the Revolutionary War should not be denied

the honors due them simply because the generation after the

war did not preserve a list of their names.

THE WAR OF 1812


The War of 1812, the second with Great Britain, was caused

by their interference with the commerce of the United States

and the enforcement of some of our seamen into their service in

their war with France.
The British forces had taken Washington, D. C, and were

threatening Virginia with an invasion. North Carolina was

called on to furnish troops for the protection of Virginia. The

people of Guilford were slow to volunteer. A mass meeting was

called to assemble at the court house, and Dr. Caldwell was asked

to address the gathering. His appeal was so effective that the

required number Avas soon made up. The following Buffalo

names appear on the ' ' Muster Roll of the Soldiers of the War of

1812," published by resolution of the State General Assembly

in 1851 :


David Burney, Robert Burney, Thomas Daugherty, Reuben

Dick, Samuel Dick, George Donnell, James Donnell, Robert

Ervin, Andrew Gamble, Henry Humphreys, Nathan Lester,

Hugh McCain, John McCain, James McQuiston, Jesse McQuis-

ton, John McQuiston, Captain Robert McQuiston, William Mc-

Quiston, John Purdue, James Ross, Robert Russell, Robert Wil-

son, William Wilson, and perhaps others.

[ 202]

WAR WITH MEXICO

This war with Mexico was from April 1846, to September,

1847, and was caused by a dispute about the boundary line. As

North Carolina was so far from the scene of conflict, and as only

a limited number of soldiers was required, our people were not

excited nor seriously affected by it. We find in the files of the

Patriot in the Public Library the names of three men who vol-

unteered as soldiers : Robert Mitchell, William Scott and Robert

Wilson.

[203]

BUFFALO MEN IN THE WAR BETWEEN THE

STATES, 1861-1865


In Buffalo congregation sentiment at first was decidedly

opposed to secession, and North Carolina was one of the last of

the eleven states to secede from the Union. But after our state

was practically forced into secession by the action of the other

Southern States, North Carolina gave her whole-hearted support

to the Confederacy. The people of Buffalo were united in this

war as they had been in all others. It was a horrible civil war.

All the able bodied men from 17 to 45 years of age were drafted

into service ; not all into the army, but in some other line of

service. Twelve of the Buffalo men were either killed in battle

or died from exposure, and many others were wounded. During

these distressing four years many of our families were reduced

to poverty, and all suffered heavy losses.


' ' No grander, no more tragic figure has ever trod the arena of

history than the Confederate soldier ' ' ; and those honored heroes

from our church deserve to have their names recorded in our

memory and in this book.


ROSTER OF THE CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS
Abbott, Jesse T. Companj^ A, 53rd Regiment.
Albright, Daniel E. (1830-1917). Son of Jacob. Captain of the
Home Guards,

Albright, Dr. William M. (1845-1899). Son of Jacob. In the


Ordnance Department.

Aydelette, Leven Denny. Son of Leven. Was in the Ordnance


Department during the entire war.

Briggs, George K. Enlisted in Person County. Company H,


24th Regiment.

Denny, Alexander Calvin (1840-1913). Son of Samuel H. Com-

pany I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. Captain
N. P. Rankin's company.

Denny, Joseph (1836-1909). Son of Samuel H. Company I, 63rd


Regiment, 5th Cavalry.

[ 204 ]

Buffalo Men in the War Between the States 205
Denny, Thomas D. (1836-1898). Son of Samuel. Company I,

63rd Regiment, 5th N. C. Cavalry.


Doggett, John (1819-1895). Lieutenant Company M, 21st Reg-

iment.
Donnell, Daniel. Son of Ervin.


Donnell, Robert C. (1827-1872). Son of Major Robert. Cap-

tain Company C, 45th North Carolina Regiment.


Donnell, Robert H. (1843-1862). Son of Ervin. Company B,

27th North Carolina Regiment. Killed in battle,


Donnell, Robert L. (1837-1862). Son of Levi. Died in service.
Donnell, S. Washington (1844-1864). Son of Emsley. Com-

pany I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. Killed

in battle at Fisher Hill.
Donnell, W. Milton (1835-1868). Son of Ervin. Became sick

in the service and died shortly after.


Efland, Madison L. (1845-1931). Son of Sampson. Lieutenant

Company D, 53rd North Carolina Regiment.


Fields, Charles Harrison (1841-1901). Company M, 21st North

Carolina Regiment.


Forbis, David Washington (1831-1891). Son of David. Com-

pany I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Forbis, Hugh Rufus. Son of David. Company B, 27th Regi-

ment. Killed in battle near Richmond, Va.


Gillespie, Daniel D. Son of Robert. Company F, 2nd Cavalry.
Hatrick, Pinkney W. (1838-1863). Son of Samuel. Lieutenant

Company A, 53rd Regiment. Killed in battle.


Hatrick, Robert Alonzo (1832-1862). Son of Samuel. Company
A, 53rd Regiment. Killed in battle.
Heath, Samuel S. (1839-1916). Served in Company K, 72nd

Regiment.


Hobbs, Oliver P. Company D, 53rd Regiment.
Jordon, Ben. (1846-1901). Son of Marcellus. Company B, 27th

Regiment.


McClintock, Geo. W. ( -1932). Company F, 19th Regiment.
McKnight, John H. Son of John and grandson of Robert. Com-

pany B, 27th Regiment. Killed at Bristoe Station in 1862.


McLean, James L. (1830-1862). Son of John Calvin. Had

moved to Mississippi and enlisted there. Killed in battle.


McLean, John B. (1833-1865). Son of John Calvin. Company
B, 27th Regiment. Died in war.

206 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


McLean, Joseph E. (1836-1865). Son of John Calvin. Com-

pany B, 27th Regiment. Died in war prison.


McLean, Milton L. (1838-1876). Son of John Calvin. Had

moved to Tennessee and enlisted there.


McLean, Robert B. (1842-1910). Son of Jolin Calvin. Company

B, 27th Regiment.


McLean, Samuel F. (1832-1864). Son of John Calvin. Com-

pany B, 27th Regiment. Killed in the battle of the Wilder-

ness.
MeNeely, Thomas. Son of Alexander. Company I, 63rd Regi-

ment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Minor, James B. Son of James. Company I, 63rd Regiment,

5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Mitchell, William P. (1817-1885). Son of Adam. Company C,

74th Regiment.


Moore, William P. (1839-1883). Son of Samuel. Company

I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Orrell, Aseph. Son of L. D. Company B, 27th Regiment.
Orrell, James A. Son of L. D. Company B, 27tli Regiment.
Orrell, Daniel W. (1845-1871). Son of L. D.
Orrell, W. C. Son of L. D. Company E, 22nd Regiment.
Rankin, John H. (1840-1917). Son of Albert. Company B,

45th Regiment. Captain S. C. Rankin's company.


Rich, George W. Son of George. Company F, 19th North Caro-

lina Cavalry.


Schoolfield, John R. (1846-1927). Son of Daniel G. Company

K, 72nd Regiment, Junior Reserves.


Scott, Adam Walker (1831-1911). Son of Donnell. Company

I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Scott, David C. Son of Dr. William D. Company I, 63rd Reg-

iment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Scott, F. Marion. Son of Donnell. Company I, 63rd Regiment,

5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Scott, John Will (1843-1918) . Son of Dr. William D. Company

A, 53rd Regiment.


Shields, A. W. Son of William T. Company B, 45th Regiment.
Sikes, William Newton (1840-1891). Son of Willis. Company

I, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Stratford, Emsley W. Son of Henry. Company B, 27th Regi-

ment.

Buffalo Men in the War Between the States 207
Thomas, Phillip. Company C, 45th Regiment.
Weatherly, Robert D. Son of Andrew. Company B, 27th Reg-

iment. Killed at Bristoe Station in 1863.


Weatherly, William H. Son of Bruce. Company K, 72nd Reg-

iment, Junior Reserves.


Wharton, James M. (1834- ) (dead). Son of Robert. Company

B, 45th Regiment.


Wharton, John E. (1835-1915). Son of David. Captain of

Company K, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Wharton, William D. (1840-1907). Son of David. Lieutenant

Company K, 63rd Regiment, 5th North Carolina Cavalry.


Wharton, William Plummer (1840-1882). Son of Robert. Com-

pany I, 63rd Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry.


Winchester, Luther C. Company A, 5th Battalion Artillery.
Young, Robert C. (1828-1865). Son of Matthew. Company F,

19th Regiment, Cavalry.


There may have been others in the Confederate service whose

names have been overlooked.


THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, 1898


This war was of short duration, but caused much excitement

for a while. There was grave danger of international compli-

cations. The real purpose on the part of the United States was

to liberate Cuba, our neighbor, from Spanish oppression. So

far as we know not a man from Buffalo was in this war.


[208]

THE WORLD WAR

The United States entered the World War on April 6, 1917.

There was great excitement throughout the nation. The Buffalo

people were deeply concerned, and all entered heartily into every

line of work for winning the war. The Red Cross committee

and committees to sell war stamps faithfully did their part.


Eight young men from our church went into the war service :
Lonnie G. Albright, son of Daniel E.
Peter Clapp, son of Henry.
Luman Doggett, son of James F.
John W. Hawkins, son of J. Lewis.
Robert A. Hawkins, son of J. Lewis.
Roy Gr. McKnight, son of John E.
Ernest Minor, son of William.
David White Moore.

[209]

ODDS AND ENDS

This is not a part of the history of Buffalo, but some things

that affected the people of the church more or less, and facts

that should be remembered.


PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES IN THE COUNTY
Alamance, six miles southeast of Greensboro, was organized

in 1762.


Bethel, located nine miles east of Greensboro, was organized

in 1813.


Greensboro First was organized in 1824.
High Point First was organized in 1859.
Springwood, located thirteen miles east of Greensboro, was

organized in 1868.


Jamestown was organized in 1881, but because of deaths and

removals it was dissolved in 1912.


Westminster, located in South Greensboro, was organized in

1887.
Midway, located five miles northeast of Greensboro, was or-

ganized in 1888. In 1923 this organization and building was

moved to the village of Bessemer, two miles east of Greensboro.


Bessemer Avenue, located in the northern part of Greensboro,

was organized in 1904. In 1920 this church was dissolved, and

the 29 members and 22 others were organized into the Church

by the Side of the Road, one block farther north. In 1933,

largely because of the financial depression and inability to carry

on, this church was dissolved by the Presbytery.


The Church of the Covenant, located in the western part of

Greensboro, was organized in 1906.


Pleasant Garden, located seven miles south of Greensboro,

was organized in 1915. Because of deaths and removals this

church was dissolved in 1933.
Glenwood, located in the southwestern part of Greensboro,

was organized in 1916.


[210]

Odds and Ends 211
GOOD NEIGHBORS
The Scotch-Irish settled the central part of Guilford Connty,

the Germans the eastern part and the English Friends or

Quakers the western part. These were good neighbors. The

same motives had prompted all three nationalities to settle here.

Each nationality had its fixed religious faith, and all three were

devoted to self-government and religious freedom. They were

all seeking a place where they and their children might live and

prosper in peace and happiness. The thi*ee were kindred spirits

in desires and principles, and they were all intelligent, sturdy,

thrifty farmers. They worked together for the common weal of

all.
THE INDIANS
The Buffalo people were never molested by the Indians.

They suffered some uneasiness at times, but so far as tradition

goes there never was a real Indian raid on this community.

The Indians had moved west of the Yadkin Eiver before the

Nottingham Colony came here. The Moravian settlement, in

what is now Forsyth County, was made about the same time our

people came here, and that settlement was a protection to this

section on the west. A few Indians lived in the bounds of

Buffalo, and others passed through the community, but they did

no harm.


POLITICAL GOVERNMENTS
Without changing its location Buffalo has lived under three

political governments. From 1756 to 1776 it was in the British

Empire, with the seat of government in London ; from 1776 to

1861 it was in the United States of America, with the seat of

government first in Philadelphia and later in Washington ; from

1861 to 1865 it was in the Confederate States of America; and

from 1865 to the present back in the United States of America,
HAW RIVER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
This church was located on the south side of Haw River, some

four or five miles east of Monticello. The people of this congre-

gation were of the same stock as the Buffalo people, and they

were closely associated, and there were often intermarriages.


212 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


The names of some of the people in this congregation were

Alexander, Boyd, Carey, Denny, Ervin, Finley, Flack, Given,

Green, Maxwell, Meteer, Nelson, Nickell, Robertson, Russell,

Smith, Starratt, Thompson, Walker, Webb and Wilson. The

deed for two acres of land was given by Robert Meteer in 1770

to Robert Given, John Robertson and Thomas Flack, trustees,

and the witnesses were William Denny, John Carey and James

Nickell. The two acres included the church building and the

graveyard. This shows that the church building was there in

1770. We are not sure just when it was organized, but Dr.

Foote states that it was perhaps organized in 1762. Rev. James

McGready was pastor from 1793 to 1796. The church became

divided on the subject of revivals and the use of Watts' hymns,

and after that it was gradually weakened until it was finally

dropped from the roll of churches. In 1818 John Maxwell

bequeathed a small sum of money to repair the building, stating,

"if it is ever done."
About 1820 a part of the old Haw River Church membership

organized a new church, located on the north side of Reedy Fork,

and about three miles below Doggett's Mill, and named it Gum

Grove Presbyterian Church. This organization was disbanded

during the War Between the States.
CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
No one now living, except those who have looked up the

records, knows that there was once a Cumberland Presbyterian

Church organization in Guilford County. In 1839 Jonathan

Short donated four acres of land for this church, located on

the head waters of South Buffalo, just south of the present fair

grounds. The trustees to whom the deed was given were Wil-

liam Armfield, Joab Hiatt, Nathan Hiatt, John McGibboney, Job

Worth, Alfred Short, Albert Short, Robert Mitchell, Arthur

Sullivan, Allen Short, Jeremiah Fields, Christopher Hiatt, Jr.,

Isaiah Armfield and Newton Short. This organization had every

promise of becoming a strong church, but it was too far removed

from Tennessee, the seat of the activities of the denomination,

and it could not be regularly supplied with preaching. Some

of the Buffalo members went into this church. The building

was blown down by a storm in 1875. An obituary notice, sup-

posed to have been written by Dr. Eli W. Caruthers, of Mrs.


Odds and Ends 213


Margaret Green, who died in 1840, states that she was a mem-

ber of the only Cumberland Presbyterian Church in the county

or state.
PUBLIC SALES
The public sales in the community were events of great

interest during the last century. Wlien a citizen died all his

personal property was usually sold at public auction. If there

was much to be sold the sale would last for several days. Peo-

ple came fifteen or twenty miles to these sales, and there were

often more than a thousand present. There is preserved in the

court house a list of the things sold, who bought them and the

price paid for each article. There were some men who habitually

went to all such public gatherings and got drunk. The day

would never pass without several hard fights. The bullies would

come to these sales with the backing of their community ; a large

circle would be formed and a real exhibition fight would ensue.


There was one of these big sales just across the road from

Buffalo Church when Nathaniel Kerr, Jr., died in 1829. He




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