Drill: Reserved & Concurrent Powers



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USHX 2.2: The Bill of Rights


Drill: Reserved & Concurrent Powers


Reserved Powers – Are the powers held by the states e.g. licenses, and diplomas.

Concurrent Powers are those shared by both the state and federal governments, and include collecting taxes.
OBJECTIVES

Students will be able to discuss the freedoms listed in the First Ten Amendment by examining the rights that the amendments provide to people accused of crimes.


1. The Bill of Rights

The First Amendment protects five basic freedoms

Fourth Amendment protects people from unreasonable searches.

The next four amendments protect citizens accused of a crime: due process.

The Fifth: evidence to indict, double jeopardy, and self-incrimination.

The Sixth Amendment requires a speedy trial.

The Seventh Amendment gives people the right to have a jury.

The Eighth Amendment allows most accused persons to make bail.



2. petition, or make a request of, the government

3. due process, or the fair application of the law

4. indict, or formally accuse

5. double jeopardy, or be tried again for the same crime.

6. eminent domain, or the right to take personal property to serve the public’s interest
Odds & Ends

1. James Madison is often called the Father of the Constitution.

2. The right of petition enables Americans to express their dissatisfaction with current laws or to suggest new ones.

3. The goal of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Amendments is to ensure that the rights of accused persons are fully protected.

4. Government has the right to take personal property when it is in the public’s interest.

5. The Sixth Amendment gives people accused of crimes the right to have an attorney.

6. The Eighth Amendment bans government from giving cruel and unusual punishments.

USHX 2.2: The Bill of Rights


1. T

2. F; The First Amendment prohibits government from supporting an official religion.

3. T

4. T

5. T

6. F; They protect the rights of accused persons.

7. T

8. T

9. F; This is a Sixth Amendment right.

10. T
LITERATURE

1. According to Theodore Roosevelt, the power of government from within the people themselves.

2. Roosevelt believed that the rest of the world is watching America to see if democracy and self-rule can succeed.

3. According to Roosevelt will wreck the hopes of others who look to America with the hope that the republic will succeed in bringing liberty and justice to all of its citizens

4. Roosevelt said their duty toward their neighbors, family, and nation

5. Good civic education of the average citizen is very important to Roosevelt. Without it, he believes that the nation itself will encounter disaster and misfortune.
Summary: In today’s lesson we discuss the freedoms listed in the First Ten Amendments by researching the rights that the amendments provide to people accused of crimes.
Home Work: Double Jeopardy & Eminent Domain

Double Jeopardy -Anyone found not guilty in a criminal trial cannot face, or be tried again for the same crime.

Eminent Domain – this rule allows the government the right to take personal property to serve public’s interest.

Name _______________ _________________________ Class _______________ Date ____________


USHX 2.2 Citizenship and the Constitution


TRUE/FALSE: Indicate whether each statement below is true or false by writing T or F in the space provided. If the statement is false, explain why.

______1. James Madison is often called the Father of the Constitution.

______2. The First Amendment permits the government to support an official religion.

______3. The freedom of speech does not mean that people can say anything they want to say.

______4. The right of petition enables Americans to express their dissatisfaction with current laws or to suggest new ones.

______5. Because the Fourth Amendment protects against unreasonable searches and seizures, officials must obtain a search warrant before they can search a person’s home.

______6. The goal of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Amendments is to ensure that the rights of crime victims are fully protected.

______7. Anyone found not guilty in a criminal trial cannot be tried again for the same crime.

______8. Government has the right to take personal property when it is in the public’s interest.

______9. The Seventh Amendment gives people accused of crimes the right to have an attorney.

______10. The Eighth Amendment bans government from giving cruel and unusual punishments.
11. List the main freedoms of the First Amendment, and explain why are they important?

12. What rights do the amendments give to people accused of crimes?


Identify:

petition:

due process:

indict:

double jeopardy:

eminent domain:
USHX 2.2: The Bill of Rights LITERATURE READING The Free Citizen

One of the most outspoken leaders on the topic of popular self-government was President Theodore Roosevelt, who held office from 1901 to 1909. Roosevelt was dedicated to the belief that each American needed to be educated and trained in order to be an effective citizen. Roosevelt’s personal moral and political philosophy about free government affected his actions as both a leader and an
USHX 2.2: The Bill of Rights LITERATURE READING The Free Citizen…Continued

average citizen. As you read the following excerpt from The Free Citizen, notice the ways in which Roosevelt thinks Americans should be good citizens.

1. We carry the responsibility for our government . . . . Men can never escape being governed. Either they must govern them-selves or they must submit to being governed by others. From lawlessness or fickleness [changing one’s mind] . . . they ref se to govern themselves, then most ass redly in the end they will have to be governed from the o t-side. They can prevent the need of government from without only by showing that they possess the power of government from within. . . . Are the American people fit to govern themselves? . . . believe they are.. . . believe the majority of the plain people of the United States will, day in and day o t, make fewer mistakes in governing themselves than any smaller class or body of men, no matter what their training, will make in trying to govern them. In spite of all o r failings and shortcomings, we of this Republic have more nearly realized than any other people on earth the ideal of justice attained through genuine popular rule.

2. . . . not for the sake only of our own country’s future . . .The history of America is now the central feat re of the history of the world; for the world has set its face hopefully toward o r democracy; and my fellow citizens, each one of you carries on your shoulders not only the burden of doing well for the sake of your own country, but the burden of doing well and of seeing that this nation does well for the sake of mankind.

Nowhere else in all the world is there such a chance for the triumph on a gigantic scale of the great cause of democratic and popular government. If we fail, the fail re will be lamentable [sad] . . . for not only shall we fail for ourselves, b t o r fail re will wreck the fond desires of all throughout the world who look toward us with the hope that here in this great Republic it shall be proved from ocean to ocean that the people can rule themselves, and thus ruling can gain liberty for and do justice both to themselves and to others. Our success means not only our own triumph, but the triumph of the ca se of the rights of the people throughout the world, and the uplifting of the banner of hope for all the nations of mankind.

3. . . . and we must be trained to bear it if freedom is to survive. The democratic ideal must be that of subordinating chaos to order . . . the individual to the community . . . of training every man to realize that no one is entitled to citizenship in a great free commonwealth unless he does his full duty to his neighbor, his full duty to his family life, and his full duty to the nation.

The republic cannot succeed if we do not take pains in educating the masters of the republic . . . t is easy enough to live under a despotism [without freedom]. You do not have to do anything; just let the other man govern.

But it is not easy to live in a republic where each man has to do his part in the governing, and where he cannot do it if there is not a sound basis of moral and intellect al training . . . steady training . . . in conscience and character, until he grows to abhor [hate] corruption and greed and tyranny and brutality and to prize justice and fair dealing. . . . Fail re to train the average citizen . . . must in the long r n entail

[involve] misfortune, shortcoming, possible disaster, upon the Nation itself.



From The Free Citizen, by Theodore Roosevelt.
UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU READ.

1. According to Theodore Roosevelt, what character traits do people need to possess in order to govern themselves?

2. Why did Roosevelt believe that the history of America is central to the history of the world?

3. According to Roosevelt, what will happen if Americans cannot make democracy succeed?

4. What did Roosevelt say that people must do in order to be entitled to full citizenship?

5. How important do you think education was to Roosevelt? What did he think would happen if citizens were not effectively educated?
In your own words, summarize today’s lesson.


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