Draft land restitution policy



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The doctrine of aboriginal title is rendered unnecessary in South Africa by the Restitution of Land Rights Act as the courts are not required to invent a legal basis for restitution claims51. Precedents exist in Germany for the extension of lodgement of land claims, and for exceptions to be made to accommodate those who could not participate from the programme where through experience their exclusion cannot be justified52. Nonetheless, there are lessons to be learnt by South Africa with regard to the jurisprudence and administrative experiences of these countries.


2 See s6 (1) of the Restitution Act

3 See s12 of the Restitution Act

4 See s14(3) read with s42D of the Restitution Act

5 See s 14(2) read with s35 of the Restitution Act

6 See s 2 (1) (e) of the Restitution Act

7 See s 25 (7) of the 1996 Constitution read with s 2 (1) of the Restitution Act

8 See sections 35 (1) and 42D of the Restitution Act

9Department of Land Affairs, White Paper on South African Land Policy, 1997

10As above 9

11 The first formal European settlement began when Jan van Riebeek established a refreshment station of the Dutch East India Company in 1652.

12 After the wars of dispossession - a Dutch and later British Colony (from 1795)

13 After the wars of dispossession -a British Colony

14 After the wars of dispossession - An Afrikaner Republic

15 After the wars of dispossession - An Afrikaner Republic

16 Being the Cape of Good Hope, Natal, Transvaal and Orange Free State

17 Section 7 of the Union of South Africa Act, 1909

18 Clause 10 of the Treaty of Vereeniging

19 Mbeki, T. The Land Shall Belong to Those Who Work it. ANCT Today, Volume 3, No 24. June, 2003 [online]. See http://www.anc.org.za/docs/anctoday/2003/at24.htm [accessed on 19 January 2013]

20 These included “independent” territories, the Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei and “self-governing” KwaZulu, Gazankulu, Lebowa, KwNgwane, KwaNdebele and QwaQwa

21 Plaatjie, ST. The Life of a Native South African 1916, page 21

22See http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheidlaws/g/No21of23.htm[accessed on 19 January 2013]

23See http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheidlaws/g/No41of50.htm[accessed on 19 January 2013]

24See http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheidlaws/g/No460f59.htm[accessed on 19 January 2013]

25 Pre 19 June 1913 dispossessions shall, as indicated, be dealt with in a separate paper.

26 Recommendations of the National Land Restitution Workshop [May, 2011]

27 See section 6 (2) (b) of the Restitution Act, read with a definition of “claimant”

28Surplus Peoples Project in the White paper on South African Land Policy, 1997; and Mbeki, T. The Land Shall Belong to Those Who Work it. ANCT Today, Volume 3, No 24. June, 2003 [online]. See http://www.anc.org.za/docs/anctoday/2003/at24.htm [accessed on 19 January 2013]

29Dube, P, “Reconsidering Historically Based Land Claims” Master’s Degree Thesis” 2009:

30Seehttp://wiredspace.wits.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10539/275/18_chapter6.pdf;jsessionid=B91F3FCD213CD64779D655626DE96F2B?sequence=18 [accessed on 8 February 2013]


31 See Hlolweni, Mfolozi & Etyeni Communities v North Pondoland Sugar (Pty) Ltd & Another, LCC 41/03

32 S1 of the Restitution Act

33Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform, budget speech 2010

34 Alexkor Ltd and Another v Richtersveld Community and Others (CCT19/03) [2003] ZACC 18; 2004 (5) SA 460 (CC); 2003 (12) BCLR 1301 (CC) (14 October 2003), paragraph 41

35 This may take various forms such as institutionalised land user rights adapted from customary tenure systems, sectional titles and a collective land use right.

36 Sections 35 (3) and 42D (3) of the Restitution Act

37. Moyo, S. 2004. The Politics of Land Distribution and Race Relations in Southern Africa. Identities, Conflict and Cohesion Programme Paper Number 10 December 2004. Geneva: United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD)

38Dube: 51

39Dube: 51. He however points out that Canada and Australia are developed countries whilst South Africa is a developing country and that the neither the Canadian nor Australian Constitutions provide for restitution. Restitution in those countries is dealt with through judicial interpretation of the common law.

40Mabo and Others v State of Queensland (No 2) (1992) 175 CLR 1 referred to in Dube: 52 and at http://www.atns.net.au/agreement.asp?EntityID=741 [accessed on 11 February 2013]

41


42Dube: 59

43 Delgamuukw v British Columbia [1997] 3 SCR 1010 referred to in Dube: 65 at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delgamuukw_v._British_Columbia [accessed on 11 February 2013]

44Dube: 70

45Dube: 70

46Bundesergänzungsgesetz zur Entschädigung für Opfer der nationalsozialistischen Verfolgung 1953, Bundesgesetz zur Entschädigung für Opfer der nationalsozialistischen Verfolgung, 1956 and Bundesentschädigungsschlussgesetz 1965.

47See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Restitution_Laws [accessed on 11 February 2013]

48As above, 68

49See http://www.afw-saarburg.de/web_en/publish/news_18.html [accessed on 11 February 2013]

50Dube: 48

51Dube: 118

52 The Bundesergänzungsgesetz zur Entschädigung für Opfer der nationalsozialistischen Verfolgung 1953 was negotiated in a period of 3 and a half months, and had to be amended to accommodate those that had been excluded from the programme

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Initials:




Land Restitution Policy (post 1913 dispossessions)







Minister










Nkwinti, GE (MP)



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