DR. mary e. Vogel visiting Scholar, 2014-present Department of Sociology nyu, 2014-present and Professor of Law, 2011-present Chair in Criminal Law University of Manchester and Benedict Distinguished Visiting Professor in Sociology and



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DR. MARY E. VOGEL


Visiting Scholar, 2014-present

Department of Sociology

NYU, 2014-present

and

Professor of Law, 2011-present

Chair in Criminal Law

University of Manchester

and

Benedict Distinguished Visiting Professor

in Sociology and Anthropology, Winter 2016

Carleton College

19 Briarwood Avenue

Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey 07716

(732)670-6685

mev298@nyu.edu

and


31 Old Gloucester St

London WC1N 3AS UK



mary.vogel@manchester.ac.uk

EDUCATION

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Ph.D. in Sociology, l988, with accompanying study in law. Graduate scholarships, stipendiary support and teaching fellowships. Interests centred on Democracratic Transformation, Law and Social Ordering. Specialization in comparative and historical sociology; socio-legal studies; methods of quantitative and qualitative social research; social theory; political sociology; jurisprudence and criminology. Themes explored included: democratic state formation and transformation; rule of law in social ordering; discretionary informality in law; social inequality and processes of its emergence, maintenance and dissolution; courts and criminal process; social conflict and divided societies; social regulation and governance; transnationalization and criminology (particularly transnational organized crime, prosecution and criminal justice).
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Doctoral study in Sociology with emphasis on socio-legal studies, criminology and criminal justice, and social theory. Graduate fellowship through the Center for Criminal Law and Criminology, Marvin Wolfgang, Director (Withdrew to return to Harvard)


HARVARD UNIVERSITY, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, Massachusetts

M.C.P. Graduate scholarship. Specialization in political and economic development, urban politics and social policy, urban economics and housing markets.


GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, School of Foreign Service, Washington, D.C.

B.S.F.S. in International Economic Affairs (Magna Cum Laude). Specialization in economic history, international economics, and processes of economic and political development.



AWARDS, FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS

Benedict Distinguished Visiting Professor in Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton College, Winter 2016

Visiting Scholar, Department of Sociology, NYU, 2014-present

SIRF, Strategic Investment Research Fund, Centre for the Study of Democratic Transformation and the Law, proposal in preparation for re-submission at Funding Committee request.

Hallsworth Conference Fund, Grant, Hosting a series of three conferences on Organized Crime and Its Prosecution in London, Manchester and Shanghai, China during 2014, August, 2013.

British Academy, Research Grant , July 2013

Visiting Scholar, Center for the Study of Law and Soceity, University of California at Berkeley, 2010

Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship, 2008-2010

Senior Visiting Fellowship, Rothermere Institute, University of Oxford, Autumn 2008-2009 and Associate Fellow, 2009--2012

Runner-Up, British Society of Criminology Book Prize, British Society of Criminology, 2008

Nominated by Oxford University Press for the John P. Reid Book Prize in Legal History, 2008

Associate Research Fellowship, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2003-2011, and Visiting Fellow, 2001-2003

Distinguished Article Prize for 1999-2000, American Sociological Association, Law Section, August 2001

Award for Best Article of 1999, Law and Society Association, May 2000

Visiting Fellowship, Wolfson College, Oxford University, Spring 1999

Visiting Scholar, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University, Spring 1999

John Adams Fellowship, School for Advanced Study, University of London, Autumn 1998

Fellow, Eccles Center, British Library, Autumn 1998

Visiting Scholar, American Bar Foundation, Autumn 1996

Dean's Summer Grant, 1994

American Philosophical Society, Grant, 1993

Bunting Fellowship, Harvard University, 1992-1993

Faculty Achievement, Presidential Awards Honoree, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1992

Dean's Faculty Development Grant, 1992

Eugene Weinstein Award for Graduate Teaching, 1991

Nuala McGann Drescher Award (Research Fellowship) 1989

Faculty Travel Award, 1989

Faculty Development Grant, 1987

Mark DeWolfe Howe Fund Grant, Harvard Law School, 1986

American Society of Criminology, Student Paper Competition Prize (Third), 1978


EXTERNAL EXAMINING/EXTERNAL EXPERT

University of London, International Programme, Examiner, 2012 to present

SOAS, University of London, Examiner, Doctoral Viva, Spring 2010

University of Cambridge, Examiner, Doctoral Viva, Spring 2009

University of Manchester, Examiner, Doctoral Viva, January 2009

External Expert, University of Bradford, 2005-2008

London School of Economics, Examiner, Doctoral Viva, Spring 2007
DOCTORAL SUPERVISIONS

Lu Ran (2013-present) University of Manchester

Santiago Amietta (2011-present) University of Manchester, (Lecturer, Middlesex University), The University of Manchester Law School Scholarship 2011-2014.

Peng Wang, PhD. 2013, KCL, (Lecturer, University of Hong Kong) King’s International Graduate Scholarship; King’s Alumni Scholarship(first supervisor, 2010-2011, with continuing supervision after my move to Manchester to the viva)

Thomas Goldup, Ph D. 2016, KCL, (Visiting Lecturer, KCL and University of Manchester). AHRC Scholarship (first supervisor, 2009-2011 with continuing supervision after my move to Manchester to the viva)

Melanie Collard (2009-2014) Lacey French Scholarship (second supervisor, 2009-2011; Acting first supervisor Spring 2011; occasional supervision to viva)

Fabian Zhilla, Ph D. 20012, KCL, (Lecturer, Canadian Institute of Technology, Tirana, Albania; Fullbright Scholar to Columbia University, 2016-2017) SOROS OpenSociety Institute Scholarship; Central Fund Scholarship, University of London (first supervisor). Fullbright Fellowship, 2016-2017.

Jacopo Martire, Ph D. 2012, KCL. (Lecturer in Law, University of Stirling, August 2012-present; Visiting Scholar, New School for Social Research, 2016). AHRC Scholarship and Modern Law Review Scholarship (first supervisor).

Zakhele Hlophe, Ph D. 2011, KCL. (Lecturer in Law, University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, April 2011-present) King’s College London International Scholarship, Dean’s Scholarship and Republic of South Africa Doctoral Fellowship for Overseas Study (first supervisor). Young Global Leaders Fellowship, Oxford University 2015-2016 and Princeton 2016-2017.

Kenneth Andrews, Ph D. 1996 (Assistant Professor, 1997-2001; John L. Loeb Associate Professor of Sociology, 2001-2003, Harvard University; Associate Professor, 2003-2010 and Professor, 2011 to present, Departmental Chair, 2014-present, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) American Council of Deans Dissertation Prize; American Sociological Association Social Movements Section Graduate Paper Prize and,

subsequently, Distinguished Book Award.

Richa Chauhan Ph.D. 1994 (Assistant Professor, Widener University) University Dissertation Award

Pedro Ibaja Ph.D. 1993 (Lecturer, Catholic University, Lima, Peru) Fulbright Scholarship

Howard Koval Ph.D. 1992 (second supervisor)

Marika Lindholm Ph.D. 1992 (Assistant Professor, 1992-2005, Northwestern University) American Sociological Association Gender Section Graduate Paper Prize

Sharon Meagher Ph.D. 1991 (Assistant Professor 1991-1998 and Professor, 1998-present, University of Scranton)



REVIEWER

National Science Foundation

American Journal of Sociology

Law and Society Review

Routledge

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)


Palgrave Macmillan
EDITORIAL BOARD

King’s College Law Journal, Editorial Board, 2006-2011


MANUSCRIPTS CURRENTLY IN REVIEW AT JOURNALS
“Legal Mobilization and Institution-Building for Local Governance in the Early American Republic: The Courts, Whig Social Ordering and the Rights-Based Discourse of Democratic Liberalism, 1820-1860”, submitted and in review at American Journal of Sociology.


PUBLICATIONS
“Plea Bargaining: Enigmas of Coercion, Fairness and Efficiency. Interpreting Fifty Years of Conflicted Research into Its Contemporary Consequences”, Issues in Juvenile Crimes and Delinquency, no. 6, November 2013 (Translated by this journal into Chinese).
“Between Markets and Hierarchies?: Constituting Postcolonial Political Authority in America’s Imagined Republic, 1820-1850. From Discourse to Discipline." 22(3) King’s Law Journal, November 2011, 335-395.
“The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining: An Approach to the Empirical Study of Discretionary Leniency” in Martin Partington, ed., Law’s Reality: Case Studies of Empirical Research on Law. Special issue of the Journal of Law and Society, Spring/Summer 2008, 201-231.
“Situating Legislative Drafting” in Helen Xanthaki, ed., 10 European Journal of Law Reform 2 (Special Issue) May 2008, 275-293.
Coercion to Compromise: Plea Bargaining, the Courts and the Making of Political Authority. New York and Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2007 (Oxford Socio-Legal Studies series edited by Keith Hawkins, Runner-Up, British Society of Criminology Book Prize, British Society of Criminology, 2008; Nominated by Oxford University Press for the John P Reid Book Prize in Legal History, 2008).
Crime, Inequality and the State. Mary E. Vogel, ed., London and New York: Routledge, 2007. Contributing authors include: Loraine Gelsthorpe, Michael Tonry, Anthony Bottoms, David Farrington, Elijah Anderson, William Julius Wilson, Al Blumstein, Robert Putnam, Tom Tyler, Christopher Uggens and Robert Sampson, among others.
“The Irony of Imprisonment: The Punitive Paradox of the Carceral Turn and the ‘Micro-Death’ of the Material’ (Introduction)” in Mary E. Vogel, ed., Crime and Inequality. London and New York: Routledge, 2007.
“Plea Bargaining and Its Historical Origins: The Courts, Discretionary Informality and the Transition to Democracy” in Mary E. Vogel, ed., Crime and Inequality. London and New York: Routledge, 2007.
“’Embedded Liberty’: Imagining Citizenship for a World of Self Rule. The American Courts in the Early National Period,” 18 King’s College Law Journal, January 2007, 23-59.

“The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining: Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation, 1830-1860" in Jo Dixon, Aaron Kupchik and Joachim Savelsberg, International Library of Criminology, Criminal Justice and Penology, Vol II: Criminal Courts, Aldershot: Ashgate, January 2007. Republication of article previously published in Law and Society Review, Vol. 33, no. 1, March 1999.


“Plea Bargaining, Discretionary Leniency and the Making of Political Authority,” Amicus Curiae, London: Society for Advanced Legal Studies, Issue 57, January/February 2005.
“Lawyering in an Age of Popular Politics: Plea Bargaining, Legal Practice and the Structure of the Boston Bar, 1800-1860” in Jerry Van Hoy, ed., Legal Professions: Work, Structure and Organization. London: Elsevier, 2001.
“The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining: Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation, 1830-1860," Law and Society Review, Vol. 33, no. 1, March 1999 (Received the Law and Society Association Award for Best Article of 1999 and the American Sociological Association, Law Section’s Distinguished Article Award for 1999-2000).
“‘L’Affaire Thomas’ and the Politics of Image,” chapter in Paul Siegel, ed., Outsiders Looking In. New York: Hampton Press, 1996.
“The Negotiated Guilty Plea: Vacancies as an Alternative to the Caseload Pressure Explanation,” The Journal of Mathematical Sociology, Vol. 21, no. 3, Summer 1996.
"Courts of Trade: Social Conflict and the Emergence of Plea Bargaining in Boston, Massachusetts, l830-l890," Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University, Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms, l988.
"Educational Grant Consolidation: Its Potential Fiscal and Distributive Effects," Harvard Educational Review, Vol. 52, no. 2, May l982, pp. l69-88.
"Introduction," to P. Michael Timpane (ed.), The Federal Interest in Financing Schooling. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Ballinger Publishing Co., l978 (with P. Michael Timpane, recently President of Columbia University Teacher’s College).
The Urban Impacts of Federal Policies. Santa Monica, California: The RAND Corporation, R-2205,6,7-KF/HEW, May l979 (with Roger J. Vaughan and Stephen M. Barro).
Mechanisms for the Implementation of Civil Rights Guarantees by Educational Institutions. Santa Monica, California: The RAND Corporation, R-2485-HEW, January l980 (with Paul Hill, et al.)
"Fiscal and Distributive Impacts of Grant Consolidation," in C. Philip Kearney and Elizabeth A. Vander Putten (eds.), Grant Consolidation: A New Balance in Federal Aid to Schools? Washington, D.C.: Institute for Educational Leadership, l979.
Formal Memorandum prepared as the request of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Washington, D.C. to proposed regulations regarding fiscal accountability for the Title I Program (which provides educational assistance to disadvantaged children) attendant to the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of l965, July l979.
Tinkering With the System: Technological Innovation in State and Local Services. Lexington, Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1977 (with Robert K. Yin and Karen A. Heald).
Patrolling the Neighborhood Beat. Santa Monica, California: The RAND

Corporation, R-l9l2-DOJ (with Robert K. Yin, Jan M. Chaiken and Deborah Both).


"The Census of Human Services Integration," Santa Monica, California: The RAND Corporation, WN-9289-HEW, 1976 (with William Lucas and Karen A. Heald).
The Process of Housing Choice. Washington, D.C.: The Urban Institute, 1975 (with John Goodman).
"Housing Satisfaction" and "Residential Location," In James Wallace (ed.), Working Paper on Early Findings: Experimental Housing Allowance Program. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Abt Associates, Inc., 1975 ("Residential Location" co-authored with Anthony Phipps).


RESEARCH PLAN AND WORK IN PROGRESS: 2015-2019
What follows can be understood as a research plan at a sufficient level of development and detail that provisional titles are sketched out. They indicate works at varying stages of development between initial drafts and complete manuscripts.
The Five Year Horizon: 2015-2020

Once my book Coercion to Compromise and my edited volume Crime, Inequality and the State were published in 2007, work moved forward on a trio of inter-related sole-authored books, an edited volume, and associated articles. Work on these is moving to conclusion now and publication of each is expected within the next five years. The first book project, which has received funding from the Leverhulme Trust and the British Academy, is an archival study using quantitative and qualitative methods. It explores the historical origins of the controversial practice of plea bargaining (or plea negotiation) in England and probes for its roots during the late 18th, 19th and early-to-mid 20th centuries. The second sole-authored book, titled Sea Change, explores the changing landscapes of transnational power to which prosecution and criminal processes, as well as citizens, are responding today. The third book considers the global expansion of plea bargaining as part of an explosion of the practices of discretionary informality in law around the world since 2000. It asks why this change has occurred now and explores its relation to politicization of the courts, corruption and reaction to the requirements of human rights. The edited volume, Comparing Prosecutions, compares and contrasts prosecutorial practice across ten countries and highlights the role of discretion, ways it is exercised and significant implications for power. (Chapters are being written by authors who are native speakers and who often are prosecutors or defense lawyers practicing in those countries as well as scholars. An introduction and theoretically-informed comparative analysis as well as a chapter on prosecution in England and Wales are written by myself.)



Works to Be Submitted to Journals by Winter 2015-2016

“Plea Bargaining and Its Consequences: Reading the Texts as Data”, being revised for review at Criminology.


"Plea Bargaining and the American Courts: Weighing Competing Accounts of Its Historical Origins,” article manuscript being submitted to Yale Law Journal in January 2016. (complete manuscript available)
“Plea Bargaining in the Decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court” article manuscript being submitted to Criminal Law Quarterly in February 2016. (partial manuscript available)
"Dueling Discourses: The Courts, "Well-Regulated" Society and the Oppositional Language of American Liberalism, 1820-1865," American Journal of Legal History in March 2016. (complete draft available)

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by August 2016

“Plea Negotiation in the Age of Reform: Origins in 19th and Early 20th Century England”, manuscript being prepared for submission to American Journal of Sociology, July 2016. (Early results from the Leverhulme-funded project.)


“The Shifting Balance of Public and Private Power in Governance,” manuscript being prepared for submission to Journal of Law and Society in August 2016 (early draft available).
“Legality and Subversion: The Paradoxical Role of Law and the Courts in the Process of Social Ordering in Postcolonial America, 1820-1850”, article manuscript being submitted to the Law and Society Review, manuscript being prepared for submission April 2016.
“Constituting the Political Subject of Self-Rule: Politics, Legal Mobilization and Social Ordering in the Early American Republic”, manuscript being prepared for submission to Law and Society Review, May 2016. (near complete draft available)

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by March 2017
Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics: The Criminal Courts in Nineteenth Century England, book manuscript being prepared for submission to OUP in January 2017.
“The Misreading of Law in Modernity,” article manuscript being prepared for submission to Modern Law Review in March 2017.
“Law in the ‘Imagined’ Republic: Social Ordering as the Focal Project of Local Governance?,” article manuscript invited by and being submitted to Law and Social Inquiry in March 2017. (partial draft)

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by July 2017
“Plea Bargaining in Twentieth-Century England and America: A Comparative Perspective,” manuscript being prepared for submission to the Criminal Law Review in June 2017.

“Plea Bargaining in England,” article manuscript being prepared for submission to Criminal Law Review, May 2017.


“The Global Movement of Plea Bargaining: Elite Power, Corruption and the ‘Burden’ of Human Rights,” manuscript being prepared for submission to Criminal Law Quarterly in July 2017.

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by March 2018
Sea Change: The Shifting Balance of Public and Private Power in Governance, book manuscript being prepared for submission to publisher by March 2018.

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by August 2019
“The Motivational Dilemma of the Common Law,” article manuscript being prepared for submission to Modern Law Review, June 2019.
“Plea Bargaining in Comparative Perspective: England and France,” manuscript being prepared for submission to the Journal of Law and Society, July 2019.
Comparing Prosecutions, edited volume being prepared for submission to publisher in August 2019.

Works to be Submitted to Publisher by December 2019
Global Expansion of Plea Bargaining: Elite Politics and Discretionary Informality in Law, book manuscript being prepared for submission to publisher in October 2019.
“The Cultural Origins of Plea Bargaining: Recrafting the Tradition of Episodic Leniency in a Context of Popular Politics," article manuscript invited by the New England Quarterly, based on a formal public Harvard Bunting Lecture, and currently in preparation for submission in November 2019.
"Compromise and Consent: Community and Work in the Emergence of Plea Bargaining, 1830-1860," article manuscript invited by and now in preparation for submission to Crime, History and Societies in December 2019.


ACADEMIC TEACHING AND RESEARCH EXPERIENCE
CARLETON COLLEGE

Benedict Distinguished Visiting Professor, Winter 2016

Teaching courses on Law and Society and Social Movements

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Visiting Scholar, Department of Sociology, 2014-present.
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

Visiting Professor (part-time), School of Criminal Justice, 2015-present

Taught course Gender, Crime and Justice, Autumn 2015.

JOHN JAY COLLEGE, CUNY

Visiting Professor (part-time), Department of Sociology, 2015-present

Taught Introduction to Sociology, Autumn 2015.


UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER, Manchester, England

Professor of Law and Chair in Criminal Law, August 2011-present. Lead criminal law and process research cluster. Lead lecturer on the large undergraduate English Criminal Law course. Courses offered include: Democratic Transformations and the Law; Criminal Law; Law and Social Theory; Prosecution and Pre-Trial Process; and Transnational and Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY, Berkeley, California

Visiting Scholar, Center for the Study of Law and Society (Spring 2010).


UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, Oxford, England

Senior Visiting Fellow, Rothermere American Institute (Autumn 2008) and Associate Fellow (Spring 2009 to 2011).


KING’S COLLEGE LONDON

Reader in Law and Democratic Transformation, 2007 to 2011; Lecturer in Law, 2005 to 2007.

Pathway Leader for Legal Theory, 2011: liased with LLM Director; planned and coordinated course offerings; arranged events for the academic staff and students on the pathway; prepared Induction presentations and reception; communicated with staff offering courses on the pathway; and prepared an annual strategy paper.

Juriste Europeen Programme, Assistant Director, King’s College London with Universite de Paris II and Humboldt University, Berlin, Spring 2010-2011. (King’s Representative to Academie d’Ete)

Courses offered include: Law and Social Theory (LLM, convenor, 2006-2011; LLB, 2006-2011, convenor spring 2006) with Alan Norrie (2005-2009), Sionaidh Douglas-Scott (2005-2007), Vanessa Munro (2005-2008), Susan Marks (2006-2007) and Christoph Kletzer 2008-2011); Criminology LLB, 2005-2007 (with Elaine Player, Ben Bowling, Penny Green, Mike Hough and Paul Turnbull); Criminology and Criminal Justice Core Course, MA, 2005-7 (with Elaine Player, Ben Bowling and Mike Hough); Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice, MA, 2005-2008 (co-convenor with Ben Bowling); Prosecution and Pre-Trial Process, MA, 2006-2011 (convenor; with Ben Bowling 2006); Transnational and Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice, MA, 2006-2011 (convenor); Democratic Transformations and the Law, MA and LLM, 2010-2011 (convenor).

Member of King’s College Law Journal Editorial Board, 2006-2011; Ethics Committee member, 2006-2009; and Convenor of Staff Seminar Series, 2006-2008.

Connectivity Project, participated with colleagues in Comparative Literature and in European Studies at King’s College London in an intercultural research collaboration with Humboldt University, Berlin,

November 2010 (Berlin) and December 2010 (London). Producing co-authored article in preparation with Dr. Florian Knauer, Law, Humboldt comparing plea bargaining and the formative influences shaping its practice in England and Germany.


UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER, Department of Criminology (previously Scarman Centre for the Study of Social Conflict)

Lecturer in Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies, MSc Programme Director, 2003-2004 and Postgraduate Tutor, 2003-2005.

Courses offered include: Knowledge and Method: The Craft of Inquiry; Understanding Crime; and Security, Data Analysis and Technology. Coordinated the Postgraduate Campus-Based MSc Programme and the Doctoral Programme prior to the thesis stage, 2003-2004. Updated all modules. Participated in the transformation of the Scarman Centre for the Study of Social Conflict into a Department of Criminology in 2003-2004 as well as a QAA visit that conferred accreditation in Spring 2004.
UNIVERSITY OF READING, Department of Sociology

Visiting Lecturer, Spring 2003. Offered courses in Introduction to Sociology and in Criminology.


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Associate Research Fellow, 2003-2009 and Visiting Fellow, 2001-2003.

Visiting Lecturer, Dickinson Seminar (Spring 2002).

Conducted seminars on comparative Constitutional traditions and also on comparative analysis of judicial review in the United States and England.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Santa Barbara, Law and Society Program

Visiting Assistant Professor (Autumn 1999 to Summer 2001). Courses offered include: Comparative Law; Introduction to Law and Society; Constitutions and Democracies; Law and American Society; Junior Pre-Thesis Honors Seminar: The Research Craft; Senior Honors Thesis Seminar; and Criminology.


UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, Oxford, England

Visiting Scholar, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies (Spring and Summer 1999) and Visiting Fellow, Wolfson College.


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

John Adams Fellow, Institute for United States Studies (Autumn 1998) and Fellow, Eccles Center, British Library (1998-1999).


UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, Department of Sociology,

Visiting Assistant Professor (January 1997- August 1998). Courses offered include: Introduction to Sociology; American Society: From the Cold War to Cyberspace; Criminology; Juvenile Delinquency; and a graduate seminar Law, Social Inequality and Change.


NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, Department of Sociology,

Visiting Assistant Professor (Autumn 1996 through Spring 1997). Taught graduate seminars on Sociological Methods of Comparative-Historical Research and Modern Social Theory.

AMERICAN BAR FOUNDATION

Visiting Scholar (Autumn 1996).


HEBREW UNIVERSITY, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem, Israel

Visiting Scholar, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, May 1993.


HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute,

Bunting Fellow (October 1992-September 1993).


STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK-STONY BROOK, Sociology Department, Honors

College and Socio-Legal Studies Program

Assistant Professor, Sociology, 1988-96; Lecturer, 1986-1988 (while completing dissertation at Harvard University).

Courses offered in Sociology include: Sociological Methods of Comparative and Historical Research (Grad); Law and the Processes of Class Formation (Grad); Classical Social Theory (Grad) as well as undergraduate courses in Political Sociology; Law and Politics in American Society (Sociology of Law); Introduction to Sociology; Contemporary Sociological Theory; American Society; and Crime and Deviance.

Invited Co-Instructor, Honors College, Taught Core Interdisciplinary Freshman Seminar, Progress and Its Discontents (From Kant to Quarks), for the University's select entering cohort of forty students, Spring 1992 and academic year 1994-95 (Co-taught with Distinguished Teaching Professor Elof Carlson (Biology Department) and Professor Edward Casey (Chairman, Philosophy Department).

Acting Director, 1988, Socio-Legal Studies Program. Advisory Board Member, 1993-96.


BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY

Visiting Assistant Professor (Summer 1990 and 1987). Taught Introduction to Sociology and also Law and Politics in American Society (Sociology of Law).


HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Department of Sociology

Graduate Dissertation Writer, 1984-1988.

Graduate Student, Coursework, 1978-1984.

Tutor and Teaching Fellow, Sociology Department, 1979-83; Teaching Fellow, History Department, 1984 (with Alan Brinkley, now at Columbia University); and Tutor, Social Studies Undergraduate Honors Program, 1978-79 (with Michael Walzer, now at Princeton University).

Dunster House, Resident Tutor, 1981 and Non-Resident Tutor, 1982-6.


SUMMER AND PART-TIME RESEARCH DURING GRADUATE STUDY
"Women and Work in Nineteenth Century New England," University of California at

San Diego, San Diego, California.

Consultant to Professor Thomas Dublin on an historical study of the careers and family lives of women working in shoe and garment production, teaching, domestic work and the needle trades. (Summer and Part-Time Autumn l983)
GOODMEASURE, INC., 330 Broadway, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Consultant and assistant to Professor Rosabeth Kanter, then of Yale University and now of Harvard Business School, on two studies -- one, a study of the management and organization of work in 50 "progressive" American companies and, the second, a study of the bases and exercise of power by "successful" middle managers. This work contributed to the book When Giants Learn to Dance. (Summer l98l)


OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PLANNING AND EVALUATION (ASPE),

U.S. DHEW

Consultant to ASPE in Washington, D.C., l979-80. Prepared the Office's analysis and critique of the proposed regulations for the Title I program for educational assistance to disadvantaged children, emphasizing resource control provisions to channel monies to designated uses, as part of the 1980 reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of l965.
THE RAND CORPORATION, 2l00 M St., Washington, D.C.

Consultant, l978-79, on study of the implementation of Civil Rights guarantees.


CENTER FOR CRMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL LAW, University of Pennsylvania.

Participated in study coordinated by Marvin Wolfgang on follow-up study to Delinquency in a Birth Cohort. (Autumn l977 through Spring l978)



RESEARCH EXPERIENCE PRIOR TO DOCTORAL STUDY
THE RAND CORPORATION, 2l00 M St., Washington, D.C.

Associate Social Scientist, l976-78. Consultant, 1975. Worked on studies of urban economic development and domestic social policy. Major project commitments included: study of inadvertant impacts of federal policies on urban economic development, patterns of residential settlement and urban fiscal conditions; analysis of the potential fiscal and distributive effects of consolidating federal categorical programs for education into block grants; and three separate studies of technological and organizational innovation.


THE URBAN INSTITUTE, 2100 M St., Washington, D.C.

Consultant, 1975. Contributed to the Integrative Analysis of the Housing Allowance Supply and Demand Experiments conducted by then-US Department of Housing and Urban Development.




MEMBERSHIPS AND POSITIONS HELD IN PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

American Sociological Association: 1986-1988, 1990-2004, 2005-2006, 2008-present

Sociology of Law Section

o Elected, Governing Council Member, August 2009- August 2011

and again August 2015-August 2017

o Committee on Nominations and Elections, Law Section,

member, 2009-2010

o Distinguished Article Prize Committee, Law Section, 2010-11;

Chair, 2010-11

o Distinguished Book Prize Committee, Law Section, 2012-13 and

2013-14; Chair, 2013-2014

o Session Organizer 2001 (“Power and Contextuality in Legal

Transformation” and “Theorizing the Autonomy of Law”)

Theory Section

o Junior Theorist Award Committee, 2013-2014

o Theory Prize Committee, 2014-2015; Chair 2014-2015

Comparative/Historical Sociology Section

o Nominating Committee, 1994

o Session Organizer 2015 (“Modern Slavery”)

Crime Law and Deviance Section,

o Session Organizer 2001 (“Law and Societal Reaction”) and

o Law, 2001 (“The Role of Law and Social Justice in the Transition

to Democracy”)

Law and Society Association: 2007-2008, 2010-2011, 2014-present

o Herbert Jacob Book Prize Committee, 2014-2015

o Session Organizer, 1998 (“Imagining the State and the Political

Subject: Nineteenth Century Formation of the American State”)

British Society of Criminology: 2005-2007

European Society of Criminology: 2007-2008

European Sociological Association: 2008-2012 (Social Theory Network)

American Society of Criminology: 1998, 2006

Socio-Legal Studies Association: 2008-2009 and 2010-2012

Social Science History Association: 1988

Session Organizer, 1988



LANGUAGES

Speak and write very good French, fair German, basic modern Hebrew and basic Italian. Read fair

Latin. Beginning study of Chinese (Mandarin).


INVITED PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS AT CONFERENCES
“Legal Mobilization and Institution-Building for Local Governance in the Early American Republic, 1820-1850”, paper presented at the Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association, Chicago, Illinois, August 2015.
“Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics: The Paradoxical Birth of a Controversial Practice”, invited lecture presented at the Department of Sociology, NYU, 11 May 2015.
“Plea Bargaining: A Comparative and Historical Perspective”, paper presented at University of Nanjing, School of Law, Nanjing, China, 3 November 2014
“Sea Change in Governance and the Power of Organised Crime”, paper presented at the Conference on Organised Crime and Its Prosecution, Shanghai, China, 30 October 2014
“Plea Bargaining and Organised Crime”, paper presented at Zhejiang Police Academy, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, China, 27 October 2014
“Plea Bargaining in the Opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court,” paper presented at the annual

meetings of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, CA, August 2014.


“Organised Crime and the Changing Function of Law,” paper presented at Conference on Organised Crime and Its Prosecution, University of Manchester, July 2014.
“Organised Crime and Plea Bargaining,” paper presented at Conference on Organised Crime

and Its Prosecution, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London, January 2014.


“Creating the Subject of Power”, paper presented at the American Sociological Association Meetings, New York, August 2013.
“Law and the Subject of Power: Courts and Discretion in Post-Revolutionary America, 1820-1850”, Legal History and Legal Theory Conference, Queen Mary University of London, April 2013.
“Constituting the Democratic Political Subject: The Legality of Politics in the Early American Republic,” paper presented at the American Sociological Association Meetings, Denver, Colorado,

August 2012.


“Plea Bargaining: Coercion or Compromise,” paper presented at the Socio-Legal Studies Association Meetings, De Montfort University, Leicester, England, 3-5 April 2012.
“Markets, Hierarchies and Subversive Legalities: Rethinking Postcolonial Liberty and the Political Subject in 19th Century American Politics and Law,” paper prepared for presentation at European Sociological Association (Social Theory Network) Meetings, Geneva, September 2011.
“Distinguished Article Prize Presentation”, American Sociological Association Meetings, Sociology of Law Section, Las Vegas, Nevada, August 2011.
“Emerging Conceptions of Liberty and Citizenship in 19th Century American Politics and Law”, paper presented at CRASSH Conference Citizenship: The Self and Political Agency, Clare College, University of Cambridge, 6 November 2010.
“Amidst Market and Hierarchies: Liberty and Citizenship in Postcolonial America”, paper presented at American Sociological Association meetings, Atlanta, Georgia, August 2010.
“Markets and Hierarchies: The Making of Postcolonial Political Authority in Nineteenth Century America”, paper presented at session Subversive Legalities: British Colonial Subjects and the Law at the Law and Society Association meetings, Chicago, Illinois, May 1910.
“Law, Discretion and Democratic Politics: Comparing England and America”, paper presented at Visiting Fellows Colloquium, Center for the Study of Law and Society, University of California at Berkeley, April 2010.
“Theorizing Discretionary Informality in Law”, Paper presented at the European Sociological Association, Lisbon, Portugal, September 2009.
“Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics”, Paper presented at the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, CA, August 2009.
“Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics: Early Findings on Origins of Plea Bargaining in 19th and 20th Century England”, Paper presented at British Society of Criminology, Cardiff, July 2009.
“Reconceptualising Regulation Post Credit Crisis”, Session Chair, WG Hart Conference, London, June 2009.
“Plea Bargaining in Global Context: Interplay with Democratic Politics”, Paper presented at Socio-Legal Studies Association, Leicester, England, March 2009.
‘The Shifting Balance of Public and Private Power in Democratic Governance’, European Sociological Association, Social Theory Network, Innsbruck, Austria, 11-13 September 2008.
‘Plea Bargaining in the U. S. and England: A Comparative Perspective,’ American Sociological Association Meetings, Boston, Massachusetts, 1-4 August 2008.
‘The Punitive Paradox of the Carceral Turn and Implications for Democratic Governance’, British Society of Criminology, Huddersfield, England, 9-11 July 2008.
‘Public and Private Power in Governance: A Shifting Balance’ WG Hart Conference, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London, 24-26 June 2008.
‘Governance and the Shifting Balance of Public and Private Power,’ Law and Society Association Meetings, Montreal, Canada, 30 May 2008.
‘Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics: Discretionary Informality in Law in Historical Context,’ Law and Society Association Meetings, Montreal, Canada, 30 May 2008.
‘Plea Bargaining and Its Origins: Comparing England and America,’ Socio-Legal Studies Association Conference, University of Manchester, England, March 2008.
‘The Shifting Balance of Public and Private Power,’ Socio-Legal Studies Association Meetings, University of Manchester, England, March 2008.
‘The Limits and Opportunities of Rights’ (Chair/Discussant) Law and Society Association Meetings, Berlin, Germany, Summer 2007.
‘Plea Bargaining and Access to Justice: Comparing England and America’ W G Hart Conference, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, University of London, London, June 2007.
‘Plea Bargaining in the US and England: A Comparative-Historical Perspective,’ Paper presented at the American Society of Criminology annual meetings, Los Angeles, California, November 2006.
‘Plea Bargaining in the US and England: Implications for Democratic Politics,’ Paper presented at the European Society of Criminology annual meetings, Tuebingen, Germany, August 2006.
Invited Discussant for paper session on Gender and the Law, American Sociological Association annual meetings, Montreal, Canada, August 2006.
‘Plea Bargaining in the US, England and France: A Comparative Perspective,’ British Society of Criminology annual meetings, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, July 2006.
‘Plea Bargaining and Democratic Politics: Discretionary Informality in Historical Context,’ W G Hart Conference, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, University of London, London, June 2006.
'Plea Bargaining and Its Origins: Estimating the Effects of Discretionary Leniency in Law,' W G Hart Conference, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, University of London, London, June 2005.
‘Democracy and the Rule of Law: Law Rule and Self Rule in Democratic State Formation,’ invited lecture, Dean’s Seminar Series, School for Advanced Study, University of London, Spring 2005.
"Criminal Justice Policy in the Making," Session Chair, American Society of Criminology Meetings, Nashville, Tennessee, November 2004.
‘Law and Society,’ invited series of lectures at university of Reading, Reading, England, Spring 2003.
‘Crime, Inequality and the State,’ invited series of lectures at University of Reading, Reading, England, Spring 2003.
“’Law Rule’ and ‘Self Rule’ in the Making of Democratic States: Conflict, Constitutional Structures and the Origins of Judicial Review,” Invited Lecture, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, June 2002.
“Plea Bargaining: Its Origins and Consequences in Comparative Perspective,” Invited Lecture, British Institute of International and Comparative Law, University of London, May 2002.
‘Constitutions and Judicial Review in Comparative Perspective,’ invited series of guest lectures, The British Legal System, Dickinson Seminar Series, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, University of London, Spring 2002.
Organizer and Presider, “The Role of Law in the Transition to Democracy,” American Sociological Association, Annual Meetings, Anaheim, California, August 2001.
Organizer and Presider, “Law and Societal Reaction,” American Sociological Association, Annual Meetings, Anaheim, California, August 2001.
Presider and Discussant, “The Debate About Sovereignty in a Globalized World,”

Law and Society Association, Annual Meetings, Budapest, Hungary, July 2001.


Presider, “Ethnicity, Minority Status and the Law,” Law and Society Association Annual Meetings, Budapest, Hungary, July 2001.
“Coercion to Compromise: Plea Bargaining, the Courts and the Making of Political Authority,” Invited Public Lecture, University of California at Santa Barbara Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Karpeles Manuscript Library, Santa Barbara, California, April 2001.
“Markets and Hierarchies: Courts, Citizens and Political Authority in Jacksonian America,” Department of Sociology Colloquium Series on Institutions, University of California at Santa Barbara, April 2000.
Presider and Organizer, “Theorizing the Autonomy of Law,” American Sociological Association, Annual Meetings, Chicago, Illinois, August 1999.
Presider and Organizer, “Power and Contextuality in Legal Transformation,” American Sociological Association, Annual Meetings, Chicago, Illinois, August 1999.
“Coercion to Compromise: Plea Bargaining, American Courts and the Making of

Political Authority, “ Invited Colloquium, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, Oxford, England, April 1999.


“Coercion to Compromise: Plea Bargaining and the Making of Political Authority,” Invited Public Lecture, School for Advanced Study, University of London, London, England, December 1998.
"The Ideology of a 'Rule of Law' and the Making of Political Authority in the Early American Republic, 1820-1850," paper accepted for presentation at annual meetings of Social Science History Association meetings, Chicago, October 1998.
"Markets and Hierarchies: Courts, Citizens and Political Authority in the Early American Republic, 1820-1850," paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, August 1998.
"Dueling Discourses: Well-Regulated Society and the Oppositional Language of Liberalism, 1820-1860," written with the assistance of Lynn Itagaki, paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, August 1998.
"Articulating a Conception of Authority and the Political Subject in a World of Self-Rule: The American Courts in the Early National Period," paper presented at the annual meetings of the Law and Society Association, Aspen, Colorado, June 1998.
"The Making of Post-Revolutionary Political Authority," invited colloquium presented at the Sociology Department, University of Michigan, February 1998.
"The Courts and the Construction of Post-Revolutionary Political Authority," paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August 1997.
"The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining: Reconsolidating Partisan Power in an Age of Popular Politics, 1830-1860," paper presented at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians, San Francisco, California, April 1997.
"Coercion to Compromise: Social Conflict and the Emergence of Plea Bargaining, 1830-1865," invited colloquium presented at Sociology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, March 1997
"The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining: Social Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation, 1830-1860," invited colloquium presented at Sociology Department, Northwestern University, November 1996.
"The Social Transformation of Plea Bargaining: Boston's Unlikely Democratic Alliance and Its Stewardship of the Transfer of Urban Power, 1870-1895," paper presented at the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, New Orleans, October 1996.
"The Cultural Origins of Plea Bargaining: Recrafting the Tradition of Episodic Leniency in the Context of Popular Politics," paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, August 1991.
"The Early Contours of Plea Bargaining, 1830-1860," paper presented at the American Sociological Association meetings, Washington, D.C., August, 1990.
"Courts of Trade: Social Conflict and the Emergence of Plea Bargaining in Boston, Massachusetts, 1830-1860," paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, California, August 1989.
"Ethnic Politics and the Transformation of Plea Bargaining, 1860-1890," paper presented at the annual Law and Society meetings, Madison, Wisconsin, June 1989.
"Courts of Trade: Social Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation," Humanities Institute Colloquium, SUNY-Stony Brook, N.Y., May 1989.

"Law and the Courts in the Process of State Formation, 1830-1890," colloquium presented to the Sociology Department at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York, April 1989.


"The Negotiated Guilty Plea: Institutional Capacity as an Alternative to the Caseload Pressure Explanation," paper presented at the Eastern Sociological Society, Baltimore, Maryland, March 1989.
"Coalition Formation: A Transaction Cost Approach," paper presented at the annual meetings of the Public Choice Association, Orlando, Florida, March 1989.
"Social Conflict and the Transformation of American Law: One Facet of Cultural Change, 1830-1850," invited paper presented at conference on "The Transformation of American Culture, 1815-1850" to commemorate the opening of the Commonwealth Center for the Study of American Culture at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, February 1989.
"Critical Analysis of Sociological Methods of Comparative and Historical Research," paper accepted for presentation at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta, Georgia, August 1988.


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