Dr. Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla



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SPANISH 499: Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies

Fall 2011

Mondays from 2 pm to 4:50 pm

THH 203

Dr. Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla


Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 9:15 am to 9:45 am AND from 12:45 pm to 1:45 pm AND by appointment

THH 156, (213) 740-1258



juliangu@usc.edu


Description
This course explores different narratives of cultural identity in contemporary Spain, particularly from the period of the political transition from dictatorship to democracy in 1975 to the present. We will consider narratives of “peripheral” nationalisms in Spain (Basque and Catalan), narratives of gender and sexuality, narratives of the Civil War and the Francoist Regime, narratives of ethnic and racial identities, narratives of immigration, or narratives of postmodernism by way of looking at different texts and media, including film, music, dance, literature, art, monuments, sport (soccer), journalistic texts, museums, and photographs. This course will allow students to gain a critical awareness of narratives of cultural and political identities and issues in contemporary Spain. We will analyze and historically contextualize a variety of cultural media that deal with how identities are shaped and contested in contemporary Spain. Students will work with a variety of media and forms of cultural production in order to draw wide conclusions about the topics covered.
1. Aims
This course will cover various topics associated with the exciting political, social, economic and cultural challenges and developments in post-Franco Spain, including the culture of the autonomous regions of Catalonia and the Basque Country. We will consider how the democratic state has impacted on cultural practices and the way in which these cultural practices have contributed to the consolidation of a democratic society. We will remember the history of Spain before and after the Civil War in order to rectify, or at least to point out to, the errors of Francoist historiography. We will read literary texts; we will watch movies, musical video-clips and concerts, flamenco shows; we will analyze photographs and pictures; we will read about football clubs; we will look at monuments, museums, buildings, urban plans; we will discuss journalistic and academic texts written in both Spanish and English as a way of exploring representative issues related to post-Franco Spanish society, thus developing our critical and analytical skills and our sensitivity towards an interdisciplinary analytical perspective which emphasizes the interaction and interdependence of cultural practices. Through this eclectic selection of cultural texts, which are embedded within broader topics that exemplify post-Franco Spain, we will pay attention to the historical, cultural, political and aesthetic concerns of this socio-historical period and how these artistic practices have greatly contributed to the cultural production of democratic Spain.
The course introduces you to a selection of cultural texts produced in post-Franco Spain. The different topics analyzed in this course will allow you to deepen your understanding of important issues that affect post-Franco Spanish society, including the recovery of History and the memory of the Civil War and the Francoist regime, the unresolved conflict between tradition and modernity, radical and moderate nationalisms, the changes in traditional gender roles, migration, racism, urban marginality and the depopulation of rural areas or the establishment of art museums in major Spanish cities as symbols of Spain’s integration into the global art market, to name just a few. The course will allow you to develop a critical understanding of the causes and ramifications of these problems. We will pay attention to the formal and thematic aspects of these cultural texts. The reading of primary and secondary sources will allow us to discuss various aspects not only related to the artistic sphere, but also to the political, social and cultural context.

2. Objectives
By the end of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

• Ability to analyze and interpret texts and cultural practices through the acquisition of a broad knowledge of significant cultural texts (film, literature, music, dance, photography, cities, museums) produced in post-Franco Spain, addressing the aesthetic and thematic concerns of these cultural texts.

• Development of linguistic ability in Spanish. The course expands our understanding of important issues related to the nation, race or gender, among others, which affect post-Franco Spanish society.

• Understanding of the principles of learning a course on a foreign langue and culture and of organizing our study independently and with the guidance of the instructor.

• Use a variety of media to consolidate our learning.

• Ability to express our individual and collective opinions.

• Develop an understanding of Hispanic culture and an awareness and sensitivity to foreign cultures.

• Adopt a critical approach to the selection and organization of the material in order to present written and oral arguments in a coherent, structured manner and to contribute to group discussions in Spanish through intellectual stimulation.

• Improve the ability to conduct academic research and learning about academic ethics.


3. Texts
A) Available at USC Bookstore:


  • MONTERO, ROSA: TE TRATARE COMO A UNA REINA. (Required)

ISBN: 9788432217173

New: $39.95

Used: $30.00


  • RIVAS, MANUEL: EL LAPIZ DEL CARPINTERO (PUNTO DE LECTURA) (P). (Required)

ISBN: 9788466318440

New: $11.95

Used: $9.00
B) Available on Blackboard one week before we cover the Topic: Fragments from:

Jo Labanyi’s Constructing Identity in 20th Century Spain: Theoretical Debates, Cultural Practice, Paul Julian Smith’s The Moderns: Time, Space and Subjectivity in Contemporary Spanish Culture, Rikki Morgan, Rikki and Barry Jordan’s Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies, Jo Labanyi and Helen Graham’s 
Spanish Cultural Studies, Cristina Moreiras, Cultura herida. Literatura y cine en la España democrática, Teresa Vilarós, El mono del desencanto. Una crítica cultural de la transición española (1973-1993) AND OTHERS.


In addition, there will be a selection of movies and other audiovisual material placed on reserve that will be part of our preparation for the class or for individual essays and group work. The students will rely at all times with the guidance necessary to perform bibliographical searches for their presentations or essays.
Primary texts include:
Week 1: Post-Franco Spain and Theories of nationalism.

Week 2: Catalan nationalism: FC Barca: “més que un club”.

Week 3: Basque nationalism: La pelota vasca (Julio Médem).

Week 4: Memory and amnesia: El Valle de los Caídos and El Guernica (Picasso).

Week 5: Memory and amnesia: El laberinto del fauno (Guillermo del Toro).

Week 6: Memory and Amnesia: El lápiz del carpintero (Manuel Rivas).

Week 7: Midterm exam.

Week 8: Women in Spain: Te trataré como a una reina (Rosa Montero).

Week 9: Queer voices: Todo sobre mi madre (Pedro Almodóvar).

Week 10: Theories of postmodernism.

Week 11: Photography (Cristina Garcia Rodero), architecture (Santiago Calatrava and Rafael Moneo), Barcelona and art museums in Spain.

Week 12: Gypsy identity: Music (Ketama and Rosario Flores) flamenco dance (Joaquín Cortés).

Week 13: Latin American migration: Flores de otro mundo (Icíar Bollaín).

Week 14: African migration: Cartas de Alou (Montxo Armendáriz).

Week 15: Revision of issues.
4. Teaching and learning methods
Each class will be based on an introduction by the instructor, followed by a presentation of 30 minutes conducted by students. These presentations will motivate class discussion. Before the class, students will prepare a report of the film and texts studied for that day and the rest of the class will think of answers or ask more questions about the films and texts studied. These learning methods will be supported by various media, including audiovisual material or computer programs. The course will be taught entirely in Spanish. The presentation of the students will count towards the final grade.
5. Participation and attendance
It is very important to arrive on time, to be well prepared and to participate in class, as the grade for participation and attendance will affect the final grade. In any case, no student may have more than 3 unjustified absences, which will mean a grade of F for participation and attendance. Therefore, do not miss classes, try to contribute to class discussions and to have a positive attitude in class and toward your peers. It is important to ask relevant questions, to be critical and analytical with the content of the class and to share ideas and opinions with the rest of the class. Finally, no examination may be taken on another date except on the date indicated and no homework or composition will be accepted on another date except on the date indicated on the syllabus.
6. Requirements
Throughout the semester, you will write two short essays of two pages (1,500 words), which will consist of a critical commentary on two films or other material studied in the course. You will write a final essay of 5 to 7 pages at the end of the semester. The essays will give you the opportunity to expand your knowledge of the relevant films and texts and topics covered in the course. Essays must be typed and must use double spacing and 12 font. Moreover, students must follow the MLA style when writing the essays (The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, seventh edition). Also, there will be a midterm exam and a final exam which will consist of several essay questions. The final grade will be the result of the following partial grades:
-Participation and Attendance: 10%

-Presentation: 10%

-Short essays: 15%

-Final essay: 20 %

-Midterm exam: 20%

-Final exam: 25%


Grades:

A 93-100


A- 90-92

B+ 87-89


B 83-86

B- 80-82


C+ 77-79

C 73-76


C- 70-72

D+ 67-69


D 63-66

D- 60-62


F less 60%
SPANISH 499: Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies, Fall 2011, Mondays from 2 pm to 4:50 pm, THH 203.
The Readings here are suggestive instead of prescriptive. This bibliography will help you with your essays. The required readings will be available on Blackboard one week before we cover the topic.
Schedule:
Week 1, Monday August 22: Post-Franco Spain and Theories of nationalism.

Week 2, Monday August 29: Catalan nationalism: FC Barca: “més que un club.”
Readings:

Balfour, S. and A. Quiroga (2007), The Reinvention of Spain: Nation and Identity Since Democracy. (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Conversi, Daniele, The Basques, the Catalans and Spain: Alternative Routes to Nationalist Mobilisation (Londres: Hurst, 1997).

Balcells, Albert (1996), Catalan Nationalism: Past and Present (New York: St. Martin’s Press).

Siebenmann, Gustav (1992), ‘El idioma como factor de la identidad cultural: el caso de Cataluña’, in Hispanic Studies in Honour of Geoffrey Ribbans, eds. by Ann L. Mackenzie and Dorothy S. Severin (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press), 355-366.

Wright, Sue, ed. (1999) Language, Democracy and Devolution in Catalonia (Clevedon: Multilingual Matters).

Woolard, Kathryn Ann (1989). Double Talk: Bilingualism and the Politics of Ethnicity in Catalonia (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press).

Football

Barça’s official web site: http://www.fcbarcelona.cat/web/castellano/. This is the Spanish version of the site: versions also exist in Catalan and English (follow the links). The web pages include a detailed history of the club.

Burns, Jimmy (2000), Barça: a people’s passion, London: Bloomsbury.

Phil Ball (2003), Morbo: the Story of Spanish Football (London: WSC Books).

Crolley, Liz (2000), ‘Football and fandom in Spain’, in Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies eds. Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas (London: Edward Arnold’, pp.304-312.

Duke, Vic and Liz Crolley (1996), Football, Nationality and the State (Harlow: Longman).

Castillo, Juan Carlos (2007), ‘The concept of loyalty and the challenge of internationalisation in post-modern Spanish football’, International Journal of Iberian Studies 20/1, pp.23-40.

Castillo, Juan Carlos (2007), ‘Play Fresh, Play Local: The Case of Athletic de Bilbao’, Sport in Society 10/4, pp.680-697.

Walton, John (2001), ‘Basque Football Rivalries in the Twentieth Century’, in Fear and Loathing in World Football eds. Gary Armstrong and Richard Giulianotti (Oxford: Berg), pp.119-133.
Week 3, September 5: LABOR DAY (NO CLASS)
Week 4, September 12: Basque nationalism: La pelota vasca (Julio Médem).
Readings:

Balfour, S. and A. Quiroga (2007), The Reinvention of Spain: Nation and Identity Since Democracy. (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Conversi, Daniele, The Basques, the Catalans and Spain: Alternative Routes to Nationalist Mobilisation (Londres: Hurst, 1997).

MacDonald, Ross B. and Monica C. Bernardo, ‘The Politics of Victimhood: Historical Memory and Peace in Spain and the Basque Region’, Journal of International Affairs 60/1, pp.173-196.



La pelota vasca

Angulo, Jesús and José Luis Rebordinos (2005), Contra la certeza: el cine de Julio Medem (San Sebastián/Huesca: Filmoteca Vasca/Festival de Cine de Huesca).

Barrenetxea Marañón, Igor (2006), ‘La pelota vasca: la piel contra la piedra: historia de una polémica’, Revista Sancho el Sabio 25 (2006), pp. 138-162. Available via http://archinet.fsancho-sabio.es/publicaciones.asp and click on the link for ‘Revista Sancho el Sabio’.

Gómez L-Quiñones, Antonio (2009)'Del diálogo y sus límites en La pelota vasca: la piel contra la piedra', Hispanic Research Journal vol 10 no 2, April, 141-156.

Stone, Rob (2007), Julio Medem (Manchester: Manchester University Press).

Week 5, September 19: : Memory and amnesia: El Valle de los Caídos y El Guernica de Picasso and SUBMISSION OF FIRST ESSAY.
Readings:

Colmeiro, José F. Memoria histórica e identidad cultural: de la postguerra a la posmodernidad Serie Memoria rota: exilios y heterodoxas; Estudios 40. Rubí (Barcelona): Anthropos, 2005. 286pp. ISBN 84 7658 733 3.

Aguilar, Paloma and Carsten Humlebæk (20020, ‘Collective Memory and National Identity in the Spanish Democracy’, History and Memory 14/1-2, pp. 121-164

Boyd, Carolyn (2008), ‘The Politics of History and Emory in Democratic Spain’, Annals of the American Academy of political and Social Science 617/1, pp.133-148.

Davis, Madeleine (2005), ‘Is Spain Recovering its Memory? Breaking the Pacto del Olvido’, Human Rights Quarterly 27/3, pp.858-880.

Druliolle, Vincent (2008), ‘Democracy Captured by its Imaginary: the Transition as Memory and Discourses of Constitutionalism in Spain’, Social & Legal Studies 17/1, pp.75-92

Labanyi, Jo (2007), ‘Memory and Modernity in democratic Spain: The Difficulty of Coming to Terms with the Spanish Civil War’, Poetics Today 28/1, pp.89-116.

Richards, Michael (2002), ‘From War Culture to Civil Society: Francoism, Social Change and Memories of the Spanish Civil War’, History and Memory 14/1-2, pp.93-120.

Richards, Michael (2000), ‘Collective Memory, the Nation-State and Post-Franco Society’ in Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas, eds, Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies (London: Arnold), 38-47.
Ley de Memoria Histórica
http://www.hoy.es/20071211/nacional/senado-aprueba-memoria-historica-20071211.html

http://www.tiempodehistoria.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=907
On the Valle del los Caídos:
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/spain/madrid/fallen/fallen.html

http://www.feelmadrid.com/valleyofthefallen.html



http://gospain.about.com/od/elescorial/ss/valle_caidos.htm (for images)
Dent Coad, Emma, ‘Constructing the Nation: Francoist Architecture’, in Helen Graham and Jo Labanyi, eds, Spanish Cultural Studies: an Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), pp. 223-225.

Valis, Noël, ‘Civil War Ghosts Entombed: Lessons on the Valley of the Fallen’, in Noël Valis, ed. Teaching Representations of the Spanish Civil War, New York: Modern Languages Association, 2007, pp.425-435.

See also the web site of theAsociación para la Recuperación de la Memoria Histórica at http://www.memoriahistorica.org/
Guernica
Chipp, Hershell, Picasso’s Guernica: history, transformation, meanings, London: Thames and Hudson, 1989

Fisch, Eberhard, Guernica by Picasso, Lweisburg: Bucknell University Press, 1988

Martin, Russell, Picasso’s War: the extraordinary story of an artist, an atrocity and a painting that shook the world, London: Scribner, 2003.
Week 6, September 26: Memory and amnesia: El laberinto del fauno (Guillermo del Toro).
Readings:

Atkinson, Michael.

"Moral Horrors in Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, the Supernatural Realm Mirrors Man's Inhumanity to Man." Film Comment, Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 43 Issue 1, pp. 50-53.

Clark, Roger; McDonald, Keith

"'A Constant Transit of Finding': Fantasy as Realisation in Pan's Labyrinth." Children's Literature in Education: An International Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 52-63, Mar 2010

Hanley, Jane

"The walls fall down: Fantasy and power in El laberinto del fauno." Studies in Hispanic Cinema, 2008, Vol. 4 Issue 1, pp. 35-45.

Hei Tsuei, Kam.

"The Antifascist Aesthetics of Pan's Labyrinth." Socialism & Democracy, Jul2008, Vol. 22 Issue 2, pp. 225-244

Hanley, Jane.

"The walls fall down: Fantasy and power in El laberinto del fauno." Studies in Hispanic Cinemas, 2008, Vol. 4 Issue 1, pp. 35-45.

Hodgen, Jacob M.

"Embracing the Horror: Tracing the Ideology of Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth." Velox: Critical Approaches to Contemporary Film, Vol 1, No 1 (2007)

Janet J. T.

"Other Pasts: Family Romances of Pan's Labyrinth." Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, Jul2008, Vol. 13 Issue 2, pp. 175-187.

Lázaro-Reboll, Antonio.

"The Transnational Reception of El espinazo del diablo (Guillermo del Toro 2001)."

Hispanic Research Journal, Feb2007, Vol. 8 Issue 1, pp. 39-51.

Levine, Deborah.

"Pan's Labyrinth." International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, Jan2008, Vol. 3 Issue 1, pp. 118-124.

Rohde-Brown, Juliet.

"Pan's Labyrinth". Psychological Perspectives, Jun2007, Vol. 50 Issue 1, pp.167-169.

Segal, Timothy

"Pan's Labyrinth : A subjective view on childhood fantasies and the nature of evil." International Review of Psychiatry, Jun2009, Vol. 21 Issue 3, pp. 269-270.

Smith, Paul Julian.

"Pan's Labyrinth (El laberinto del fauno). Film Quarterly, Summer2007, Vol. 60 Issue 4, pp. 4-9.

Tanvir, Kuhu.

"Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of History." Wide Screen, 2009, Vol. 1 Issue 1, pp1-4.

Thormann, Janet .

"Other Pasts: Family Romances of Pan's Labyrinth." Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, Jul2008, Vol. 13 Issue 2, pp.175-187.

Tsuei, Kam Hei.

"The Antifascist Aesthetics of Pan's Labyrinth." Socialism and Democracy. Jul 2008. Vol. 22, Iss. 2.

Yocom, Margaret R.

"Pan's Labyrinth (El laberinto delfauno)." Marvels & Tales, 2008, Vol. 22 Issue 2, pp. 345-348.

Zipes, Jack.

"Pan's Labyrinth (El laberinto delfauno)." Journal of American Folklore, Spring2008, Vol. 121 Issue 480, pp. 236-240.


Week 7, October 3: El lápiz del carpintero (Manuel Rivas).
Week 8, October 10: Midterm exam
Week 9, October 17: Women in Spain: Te trataré como a una reina (Rosa Montero).
Week 10, October 24: Queer voices: Todo sobre mi madre (Pedro Almodóvar).
Readings:

Acevedo-Munoz, Ernesto, "The Body and Spain: Pedro Almodóvar's All About My Mother" Quarterly Review of Film and Video Volume 21, Number 1 March 2004, pp. 25-38.

Amago, Samuel, "Todo sobre Barcelona: Refiguring Spanish Identities in Recent European Cinema." Hispanic Research Journal, Feb2007, Vol. 8 Issue 1, pp. 11-25.

Bersani, Leo, Forms of being: cinema, aesthetics, subjectivity Published: London : BFI, 2004.

D'Lugo, Marvin, "The geopolitical aesthetic in recent Spanish films." Post Script Wntr-Spring 2002 v21.2

Edwards, Gwynne, "From screen to stage: Almodovar's All About My Mother." New Review of Film & Television Studies, Dec2008, Vol. 6 Issue 3, pp. 285-301.

Garlinger, Patrick Paul, "All About Agrado, Or the Sincerity Of Camp in Almodóvar's Todo Sobre Mi Madre." Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Feb2004, Vol. 5 Issue 1.

Kinder,Marsha, "Reinventing the motherland: Almodoóvar's brain-dead trilogy." Film Quarterly 58.2 (Winter 2004).

Poyato Sanchez, Pedro, Todo sobre mi madre : Pedro Almodóvar (1991) Valencia : Nau Llibres ; Barcelona : Ediciones Octaedro, [2007].

Ressner, Jeffrey.

Smith, Paul Julian, "Silicone and sentiment." ('All about my Mother') Sight and Sound Sept 1999 v9.9 .
Week 11, October 31: Theories of Postmodernism and Photography (Cristina Garcia Rodero), arquitecture (Santiago Calatrava and Rafael Moneo), Barcelona and art museums in Spain. SUBMISSION OF SECOND ESSAY.
Readings:

Paul Julian Smith, The Future in the Past: Cristina García Rodero and Rafael Moneo (in The Moderns pp. 42-59).

Jo Labanyi, Helen Graham and Antonio Sánchez, Conclusion: Modernity and Cultural Pluralism (in Spanish Cultural Studies pp. 396-418).

Antonio Sánchez, Barcelona’s Magic Mirror: Narcissism or the Rediscovery of Public Space and Collective Identity pp. 294-310 and Xon de Ros, The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao: High Art as Poular Culture pp. 280-294 (in Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spain).

Selma Reuben Holo, The Art Museum as a Means of Refiguring Regional Identity in Democratic Spain (in Refiguring Spain).

Cultural Memory, Commerce and the Arts: The Valencian Institute of Modern Art (in Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies pp. 92-101).


Week 12, November 7: Gypsy identity: Music (Ketama and Rosario Flores) flamenco dance (Joaquín Cortés).
Readings:

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘The Representation of Ethnicity and ‘Race’ in Contemporary Spanish Cinema’ (article to be distributed in class)

Lou Charnon-Deutsch, ‘Travels of the Imaginary Spanish Gypsy’ in Jo Labanyi, Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spain.

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘Ethnic and Racial Configurations in Contemporary Spanish Culture’ in Jo Labanyi, Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spain

Paul Julian Smith, ‘Cross-Cut: Gypsy’, in Paul Julian Smith, The Moderns: Time, Space and Subjectivity in Contemporary Spanish Culture.
Week 13, November 14: Latin American migration: Flores de otro mundo (Icíar Bollaín).
Readings:

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘The Representation of Ethnicity and Race in Contemporary Spanish Cinema’.

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘Ethnic and Racial Configurations in Contemporary Spanish Culture’ in Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spain

Parvati Nair, ‘In modernity’s wake : transculturality, deterritorialization and the question of community in Icíar Bollaín’s flores de otro mundo’, Post script, v.21, n.2 (2002).

Cristina Martínez-Carazo, ‘Flores de otro mundo: la pluralidad como propuesta’, Letras Peninsulares, Fall 2002.
Week 14, November 21: African migration: Cartas de Alou (Montxo Armendáriz).
Readings:

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘The Representation of Ethnicity and Race in Contemporary Spanish Cinema’.

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘Ethnic and Racial Configurations in Contemporary Spanish Culture’.

Isabel Santaolalla, ‘El africano y el asiático: El “otro” por excelencia’ in Etnicidad y “raza” en el cine español contemporáneo.

Isolina Ballesteros, ‘Xenofobia y racismo en España’ in Cine (in)surgente; textos fílmicos y contextos culturales de la España postfranquista.

Yolanda Molina and Thomas Di Salvo, ‘Policing Spanish/European Borders: Xenophobia and Racism in Contemporary Spanish Cinema’ (http://www.lehman.cuny.edu/ciberletras/v05/molina).


Week 15, November 38: Revision and SUBMISSION OF FINAL ESSAY.
Final exam: Friday, December 9 2011 from 2pm to 4 p.m.

Statement for Students with Disabilities

Any student requesting academic accommodations based on a disability is required to register with Disability Services and Programs (DSP) each semester. A letter of verification for approved accommodations can be obtained from DSP. Please be sure the letter is delivered to me (or to TA) as early in the semester as possible. DSP is located in STU 301 and is open 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The phone number for DSP is (213) 740-0776.


Statement on Academic Integrity

USC seeks to maintain an optimal learning environment. General principles of academic honesty include the concept of respect for the intellectual property of others, the expectation that individual work will be submitted unless otherwise allowed by an instructor, and the obligations both to protect one’s own academic work from misuse by others as well as to avoid using another’s work as one’s own. All students are expected to understand and abide by these principles. Scampus, the Student Guidebook, contains the Student Conduct Code in Section11.00, while the recommended sanctions are located in Appendix A: http://www.usc.edu/dept/publications/SCAMPUS/gov/. Students will be referred to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards for further review, should there be any suspicion of academic dishonesty. The Review process can be found at: http://www.usc.edu/student-affairs/SJACS/.








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