DLenm project glad colonial Regions and the Thirteen Colonies Austin Independent School District, 8th grade idea pages



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ELD Questions for Jamestown Pictorial
Point to (targets ELPS beginning level):

  • Show me the forest. (knowledge)

  • Point to the James River. (knowledge)

  • Identify the crops. (comprehension)

  • Point to the way that the Jamestown settlers stayed safe? (analysis)

  • (Show two pictures.) Which of these shows why the settlers did not like the gentry? (analyis)

  • Point to the Powhatan Chief. (knowledge)


Yes/no (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  • Did any women arrive with the first Jamestown settlers? (knowledge)

  • Did Pocahontas and James Rolfe’s marriage help the settlers? (analysis)

  • Did the settlers find gold? (knowledge)

  • Would it have been better for the settlers if more people knew how to farm? (evaluation)

  • Would it be a good idea to go outside of the fort? (evaluation)


Either/or (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  • Were the gentry willing or not willing to work to build new houses? (comprehension)

  • Was John Smith or John Rolfe the captain of the settlers? (knowledge)

  • Did settlers grow tobacco right away or did they wait until the second year they were at Jamestown? (comprehension)

  • Was the Starving Time a difficult time or an easy time? (analysis)

  • Were the settlers prepared to live in North America or not? (knowledge)

  • Would you rather be a settler or an Indian? (Point to pictures.) (evaluation)

Open-ended questions (need to adjust expectations for answers based on students’ language levels, targets ELPS intermediate, advanced and advanced-high levels):

  • Why do you think the settlers began the House of Burgesses? (synthesis)

  • Why do you think the Indians grew angry with the settlers? (appliction)

  • Do you think the settlers were smart or foolish to leave England and travel to North America? (comprehension)

  • Why do you think the fort was built with only 3 sides? (analysis)

  • The salt water in the Chesapeake Bay got into the water of the James River? Explain why that caused problems for the settlers. (synthesis)

  • How do you think they took care of those who got sick? (analysis)

  • What do you think the settlers ate when they first arrived? Why? (analysis)


Narrative Input Chart

Blood on the River James Town 1607 by Elisa Carbone

Excerpt From: CARBONE, ELISA. “Blood on the River.” iBooks. https://itun.es/us/8lxvv.l

Page 1


“LONDON, ENGLAND, OCTOBER 1606

MY FEET SLAP, bare and cold, on the cobblestones. I’m breathing hard from running. I turn the corner—the street is dark, empty. It’s my chance. I find the right door under the sign with three gold balls. I’ve carried a rock with me. I slam the rock down hard on the padlock, pounding until it breaks free. Inside the pawnshop it is quiet and musty. It smells of old wood and candle wax.

There is the locket, displayed on a piece of beaver felt. I close my fingers around the cool, smooth silver. I haven’t touched it since the day she died.

Mine. It should have been mine, because it was hers. I pull, but it is wired down tightly.

I hear footsteps outside. I panic, yank on the wire—too hard. The wire slices my hand. I see my blood drip, but the locket is in my grasp.

“You! Boy!” A man lumbers into the shop—it’s the shopkeeper come from his house across the street.”

“He lunges, grabs me, but I’m too fast. I squirm away and run, escape out into the fog, and I’m lost. Disappeared.

Page 2


I walk along the docks, past the dark hulks of ships bobbing slowly. My heart is still racing. I try to calm myself. I listen to sailors laughing and arguing, their card games stretching into the night. I even venture a whistle— nothing fancy, just my own tune. The shopkeeper will not find me, I promise myself. When he sees me in the daylight he will not know it was I who wrenched out of his grasp in the dark shop. And he certainly would never guess that I have not stolen anything, only taken back what is mine. It should have been given to me when she died, this locket of my mother’s.

Page 3


“This will bring a pretty penny,” they said at the poorhouse. “It will pay for some of the extra food you eat.”

Can I help it if I’m always hungry?

Then they expected me to stay on and keep working in the nailery, keep letting them beat me when they felt like it. As if I wanted to live in the poorhouse. As if Mum and I had wanted to be kicked out of our cottage on our farm. As if the blight was our fault and we wanted the crops to rot in the fields and had planned all along not to pay the rent to the lord of our cottage.

But I chose the streets instead. I’d rather dig in the garbage heaps with the rats for my meals.

Who knows? Maybe my mum would still be alive if she hadn’t been a widow and hadn’t had to work so hard—first for the greasy, fat gentleman who owned our farm and cottage, and then, after we’d been kicked off, making nails for twelve hours a day to pay our way at the poorhouse. Maybe she would still be alive if she’d had an easier time of it. Not my father, though. He would have drunk himself to death no matter what.

Page 4


I find my favorite hollow near the London Bridge. Spiked on a pole atop the bridge is the severed head of a traitor—a man who betrayed the crown of England and paid for it with his life. I turn my face away so I don’t have to look at those dull, staring eyes.

I curl up to go to sleep. For this one night, the locket is around my neck, hidden under my shirt. One night.

Page 5

A SHARP KICK to the ribs wakes me.



“This looks like the one done it—scraggly hair and scrawny as a broomstick.”

I’m on my feet in a split second.

“Grab him!”

I try to twist free, but hands close on my arms, my neck. It’s the shopkeeper and his burly son.

I thrash and kick. They tighten their hold until it hurts. The shopkeeper pulls the locket out from under my shirt. “Ah, what have we here?” he says. A grin shows teeth brown as worms.

“It’s mine,” I cry. “Mine!”

They don’t listen. They talk between themselves as they tie my arms behind me with ropes.

“The magistrate will enjoy this delivery—another criminal off the streets.”

“The sooner he’s hanged the better.”

I throw my head back hard. It hits the son square in the chin.

“Yeow!” he cries. “He made me bite my tongue!”

He returns my blow. One swipe with his hand to the side of my head, just like my father used to do. And just like in the old days, I see black, feel my knees crumple, and I’m out before I hit the ground.”

Page 6

SOME WOULD SAY I am lucky. Others would say I’m doomed. I escaped the gallows—that is why I am lucky. The magistrate mumbled something about having a son my age, pulled me out of my dark jail cell after just two days, and marched me down to the orphanage. “His name’s Samuel Collier, age eleven, son of dead peasants. Can you take him?” he asked Reverend Hunt when he opened the orphanage door.



The reverend nodded to the magistrate and showed me to my bed in a row of neatly made beds.

Reverend Hunt is a tall, quiet man with broad shoulders and more patience than anyone I have ever known. He tells me I have a lot to learn about right and wrong.

It was wrong to steal the locket,” he says. “It was no longer yours—it belonged to the pawnshop owner.” He says I need to make decisions based on love, not on anger.

I loved my mum and wanted her locket back, so I was acting out of love,” I say.

He just shakes his head. “The locket would not have brought your mother back,” he says. I know he is right, and I know the real reason I stole it is that I was angry at the bosses at the poorhouse, angry at our landlord, angry at the world. But how can I make decisions based on love when there is no one left to love?

Page 7


The orphanage was not a bad place—better than sleeping on the streets. Maybe if I’d been less of a danger to the other boys they’d have let me stay. But the boys started calling me “thief” and “jail rat” and I knew only one way to settle the argument: with my fists. Collin’s nose spurting bright red blood was quite an accomplishment. But I think Richard’s tooth only fell out because it was already loose when I punched him.

As for being doomed, if I am doomed then so is Richard. We are the two boys Reverend Hunt decided to bring with him on this journey to the New World. Richard is to be the reverend’s servant, and I am to serve a man called Captain John Smith.

Page 8

It is early on a December morning as we walk from the orphanage to the docks. Fog hangs thick and cold. It makes the stone houses drip and the wattle and daub houses look soggy. Richard carries Reverend Hunt’s satchel, heavy with his books and Bible and some extra clothes. My new shoes clomp on the cobblestones. The shoes are too big—passed on from an older boy who died at the orphanage last month—but Reverend Hunt says I can’t go barefoot in the New World.



The New World. The boys—Collin and the others—think we will die there. They even begged Reverend Hunt not to go. The reverend explained to them the importance of the mission. King James has granted a charter to the Virginia Company of London to send men to the New World, to Virginia. The men will explore for gold, silver, and jewels, and for a new passage to the Orient, and they’ll cut down New World trees to send back to England to build English houses—all to make a big profit for the investors of the Virginia Company. But the real importance, Reverend Hunt says, is to bring the good news of Christ to the native people who live in Virginia. He says we’ll also look for survivors from the Roanoke colony, the settlers who went to Virginia with Sir Walter Raleigh over twenty years ago. That is why Reverend Hunt wants to go. But I want to go for the gold. They say it washes up on shore with every tide.

Page 9


We reach the harbor. The sky is gray with morning light, and the place is alive with commotion. Hawkers call out their wares, and I smell fresh baked bread. Sailors pull on ropes and pulleys, lifting barrels to swing from each ship’s yard arm so they can be loaded onboard. Officers shout orders, and sailors march up the gangways carrying loads on their shoulders. Reverend Hunt points out the three ships that will be ours. Their hulls and scaffolding are newly painted in rich blue, deep maroon, and pale yellow. He says the largest one is the Susan Constant, next in size is the Godspeed, and the smallest, a pinnace, is the Discovery. They bob next to the docks, and I watch as crates of chickens are carried on board.

I scan the throng of men milling around the docks. There are hoards of gentlemen dressed in velvet and silk, sailors in their wide-legged slops, and one very dirty boy selling eels. I wonder where he is, this Captain John Smith. Reverend Hunt says he is a soldier, an officer—not a ship’s captain but a captain in the English military. And he is a commoner, a yeoman, so I don’t look for him among the gentlemen.

Page 10

I am to be Captain Smith’s page, which means I’m supposed to serve him and learn from him. I don’t argue with Reverend Hunt, but inside I scoff at the idea. Me, an apprentice to an officer? I’ve never been teachable in my life. Except my mum teaching me how to read—that, I sat still for. But my father tried to teach me smithing, and when I ruined a piece of iron, out came his fist. I won’t have some man I hardly know trying to beat sense into me.



A man comes marching up,“Is this the boy you promised me? Which one is the fighter?”

Reverend Hunt nods my way. The man, who I think must be Captain John Smith, narrows his eyes at me. I narrow my eyes back at him. I have a moment to study him while he studies me. Not tall, but stocky and strong. Curly reddish-brown hair and beard. Flashing green eyes. If you beat me I’ll spit in your ale, I threaten silently.

Captain Smith smiles slightly, almost as if he has heard my unspoken threat. “Yes,” he says slowly. “We’ll take that energy you’ve got for fighting and put it to some good use.” He turns to Reverend Hunt. “At least we’ll have a good worker here.”

Is that what he plans for me? To make me into a work-horse? I cross my arms over my chest and scowl.

Captain Smith looks about at the crowd. “Where is Captain Newport?” he asks impatiently. “I want to speak to him about this gentleman problem.” He marches off, leaving us behind.

Page 11


Reverend Hunt turns to me and Richard. “There are men here whom you must show extra respect to, you understand?”

Richard and I both nod. I have never seen so many finely dressed gentlemen in one place.

Over there.” Reverend Hunt points discreetly with his chin. “Sir Edward Maria Wingfield. A very high-ranking gentleman, and a member of the Virginia Company. Remember who he is.”

I take a good look at Edward Maria Wingfield. He’s got a puffed-out chest and a strut like a peacock. Wingfield, I say to myself, imagining him with bright tail feathers and wings. I won’t forget.

And there,” Reverend Hunt says. “Captain Bartholomew Gosnold, captain of the Godspeed.”

I already have birds on my mind, so I think of a gosling with light-colored down to match Captain Gosnold’s fair hair.

And him,” Reverend Hunt says. “That’s Captain John Ratcliffe, captain of the Discovery, the smallest ship.”

Captain Ratcliffe has close-set, beady eyes and a long, pointy nose. “Ratcliffe,” I whisper, and have to bite my lip to keep from snickering.

Page 12

And over there is Captain Christopher Newport. He’s captain of the Susan Constant and leader of the whole expedition. Do not forget who he is.”



I see Captain Smith talking to a tall, dark-haired man in a red doublet. The man’s right sleeve is pinned up and empty. I remember the boys at the orphanage talking about Captain Newport, how he was in a battle at sea with the Spanish and got his arm shot off. I would think that the loss of an arm would diminish a man, but I see that it has not diminished Captain Newport one bit. He nods to Captain Smith, then looks over the scene around him with an air of confidence and authority, as if it were his kingdom. In fact, these three ships and all of the men on board are his kingdom until he drops us colonists safely in the New World.

Now wait here,” Reverend Hunt tells us. “I’m going to find out which ship we’ll be on.”

Richard and I stand there but we don’t talk. Richard is younger than I am by a year, and a bit shorter and broader, with dark, serious eyes. We haven’t said a word to each other since I knocked his tooth out. This suits me just fine; I don’t need a friend. I haven’t needed anyone since my mum died.

Reverend Hunt returns and tells us we’ll be passengers on the flagship, the Susan Constant. A breeze picks up. It will be a good day for sailing.

Get your men on board,” Captain Newport orders.

I feel a leap of excitement inside me. Doomed or not, the adventure is about to begin.



ELD Review Questions

Blood on the River

Choose questions that match your instructional focus with students. Questions were written assuming students are familiar with the historical fiction.



Point to (targets ELPS beginning level):

  1. Point to a picture that shows the setting of the story. (know/remember)

  2. Point to the beginning of the story where we find out that Samuel is in trouble for taking back his mother’s locket. (know/remember)

  3. Point to the picture that shows unhappy children. (comprehend) Point to Samuel’s most important or valued possession. (know/remember)

  4. Point to the picture that shows the man that got Samuel out of the orphanage. (know/remember)

  5. Point to the captain that you think you could trust. (evaluate)

Yes/no (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  1. Is Blood on the River about people from England? (know/remember)

  2. Does Samuel go on board the Susan Constant ship? (know/remember)

  3. Did Samuel break the law? (Extension – How do you know? (apply)

  4. Which do you think was better for Samuel, to stay in the orphanage or to go on the voyage to the New World to serve Captain John Smith? (evaluate)

Either/or (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  1. Did Samuel board the Susan Constand or the Godspeed for the voyage to the New World? (comprehend/understand)

  2. Was Samuel afraid or nervous about serving Captain John Smith? (analyze) (Extension-Why?, evaluate)

  3. Do you think the voyage to the New World will be easy or difficult? (analyze) (Extension – Why?, analyze)

  4. Do you think Samuel taking back his mother’s locket was worth it? (evaluate)

Open-ended questions (need to adjust expectations for answers based on students’ language levels, targets ELPS intermediate, advanced and advanced-high levels)

  1. What were the three ships that would be sailed to the New World? (know/remember)

  2. When in history does this story take place? (know/remember)

  3. Why do you think Samuel took the locket? Explain. (analyze)

  4. How would you feel if you were Samuel? Why? (analyze)

  5. Do you think Samuel was justified in taking back his mother’s locket? (evaluate) Why? (analyze)

Literacy Awards on following pages




This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.

group 99 group 100 group 101 group 103 group 104 group 102 rectangle 24 rectangle 29 rectangle 39 rectangle 44 rectangle 49
Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607

rectangle 65
This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607


This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


This colony was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas.

How do you think that influenced our culture?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607


Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607


Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607


Jamestown Colony

Founded in 1607

group 99group 100group 101group 103group 104group 102rectangle 24rectangle 29rectangle 39rectangle 44rectangle 49rectangle 65
Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


The people and events surrounding this colony are a part of American folklore, including Thanksgiving and plymouth rock.
What is the purpose of folklore?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


Plymouth Colony

Founded in 1620


The people and events surrounding this colony are a part of American folklore, including Thanksgiving and plymouth rock.
What is the purpose of folklore?

Sketch or write what you think on the back of this card.


The people and events surrounding this colony are a part of American folklore, including Thanksgiving and plymouth rock.
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