DLenm project glad colonial Regions and the Thirteen Colonies Austin Independent School District, 8th grade idea pages



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SAMPLE DAILY LESSON PLAN (5 Day)

NOTE: Italicized strategies are used daily in the classroom. Each day is the equivalent of 1 to 1 ½ weeks of instruction.

DAY 1:

FOCUS/MOTIVATION

Three Personal Standards with Literacy Awards

• Prediction/Reaction Guide

Cognitive Content Dictionary (CCD) with Signal Word

• Observation Charts

Inquiry Chart

• Big Book

Poetry/Chants

• Portfolios
INPUT

• Graphic Organizer – Thirteen Colonies



  • 10/2 lecture with primary language

  • Learning Log

  • ELD Review

• Pictorial Input Chart – Jamestown Settlement

  • 10/2 lecture with primary language

  • Learning Log

  • ELD Review

• Narrative Input Chart – “Blood on the River”

  •  Narrative Input Chart – “Blood on the River”

  • - 10/2 lecture with primary language

  • - Learning Log

- ELD review
GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

T-graph for Social Skills– Team points

 Picture File

- Free exploration

- List, Group, Label

- Exploration Report


READING/WRITING

 Interactive Journals


WRITER’S WORKSHOP

  • Mini lesson

  • Write/Plan

  • Author’s Chair

  • Conference


CLOSURE

• Home/School Connection


DAY 2:

FOCUS/MOTIVATION

Cognitive Content Dictionary with Signal Word

 Process Home/School Connection

Three Personal Standards with Literacy Awards

 Process Colonial Trade Graphic Organizer with word cards

• Process Jamestown Input Chart with word cards and picture file cards

 Process Chant- highlighting, sketching, picture file cards

 Review Big Book


INPUT

 Comparative Input Chart – Jamestown and Plymouth

- 10/2 lecture with primary language

- Learning Log

- ELD review
GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

Poetry and Chants

Review T-Graph for Social Skills

Team Tasks



  1. Key

  2. Menu

  3. Process T-Graph for Social Skills

  4. Team Share


READING/WRITING

• Expert Groups: Flexible Groups Reading- leveled, skill, heterogeneous, homogeneous, ELD


WRITER’S WORKSHOP

  • Mini-lesson

  • Write/Plan

  • Author’s Chair

  • Conference,

  • Publish


CLOSURE

Process charts

Poetry, chanting

 Journals

 Home/School Connection
DAY 3:

FOCUS/MOTIVATION

Cognitive Content Dictionary with Signal Word

 Process Home/School Connection

Three Personal Standards with Literacy Awards

 Read Aloud (Picture Book)

• Review Narrative Input chart with words cards and conversation bubbles

Process Chants- highlight, sketch, add picture file cards
INPUT

• Personal interaction –


GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

 Sentence Patterning Chart (Farmer and the Dell)



  1. Reading Game

  2. Trading Game

  3. Flip Chant

• Expert Groups : Flexible Group Reading- leveled, skill, heterogeneous, homogeneous, ELD
READING/WRITING

Team Tasks


GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

• Mind Map – whole group modeling

• Process Grid – first row from mind map, rest of the rows from Expert Groups (numbered heads together)
READING/WRITING

 Cooperative Strip Paragraph- Read, respond, revise, edit

 Listen and Sketch
WRITER’S WORKSHOP

Mini-lesson

• Write/Plan

• Author’s Chair

• Conference, Publish
CLOSURE

Read Aloud – Expository Text

Process charts

• Interactive Journal writing

 Home/School Connection
DAY 4

FOCUS/MOTIVATION

Cognitive Content Dictionary with “Stumper Word” (student self- selected vocabulary)

 Process Home/School Connection

Three Personal Standards with Literacy Awards

 Read Aloud – topic: water conservation

 Review Narrative Input Chart with Story Map


GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

Process Chantshighlight, sketch add picture file cards


READING/WRITING

• Strip book from SPC

• Poetry Frame

Flexible Groups Reading- leveled, skill, heterogeneous, homogeneous, ELD



  • Team Tasks with oral evaluation

  • Clunker and Links- at or above grade level with SQ3R

  • ELD Group Frame-- Story Retell based on narrative – “Blood on the River”

  • Coop Strip Paragraph group- struggling/emergent readers

  • DRTA- Non fiction


WRITER’S WORKSHOP

  • Mini-lesson

  • Write/Plan

  • Author’s Chair

  • Conferencing

  • Publish


CLOSURE

• Home School Connection

Interactive Journals

• Process Charts

• Action Plan (whole class first, then in teams) – Conflict in Jamestown
DAY 5:

FOCUS/MOTIVATION

Cognitive Content Dictionary with “stumper word”, self-selected Vocabulary

 Process Home/School Connection

Three Personal Standards with Literacy Awards

Chants/Poetry
READING/WRITING

Flexible Groups Reading- leveled, skill, heterogeneous, homogeneous, ELD

 Team Tasks- with team written evaluation of T-Graph

 Ear-to-Ear reading with Poetry Booklet

 Found Poetry

 Focused Reading with personal Cognitive Content Dictionary


WRITER’S WORKSHOP

  • Mini-lesson

  • Write/Plan

  • Author’s Chair

  • Conferencing

  • Publish



CLOSURE

Process charts, especially Inquiry Chart

 Read Aloud

 Action Plan - Team

 Team Big Book

• Team Explorations with rubric

• Individual Explorations with rubric

 Graffiti Wall

 Student generated tests

Letter Home

 Jeopardy/Family Feud

• Evaluate Week



Colonial Settlements and the Thirteen Colonies

Prediction Reaction Guide

Respond to each question by sketching and writing.



  1. Why did Europeans come to North America in the 1600s?


Prediction

Reaction


  1. What did colonists do to survive in the new settlements and colonies?


Prediction

Reaction


  1. W
    Prediction

    Reaction
    hat caused the conflicts between the settlers and the Native people?





  1. Prediction

    Reaction
    How were the colonies different from one another?

Colonial Settlements and the Thirteen Colonies

By Ruth Kriteman and Erin Mayer

Table of Contents

Page 1 Europeans Voyage to the New World

Page 2 Reasons for the Voyage

Page 3 In Search of Religious Freedom

Page 4 Native People

Page 5 The 13 Colonies

Page 6 Representative Government

Page 7 Glossary

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Europeans began coming to North America hundreds of years ago. The voyage across the Atlantic Ocean was very difficult.



  • They traveled in large ships. Passengers spent most of the voyage below deck so that they didn’t interfere with the work of the sailors. The below-deck was dark and smelly. There were no windows to bring in fresh air. There was no way to escape storms, bad weather or choppy seas.

  • Many people became very sick. Some died.

  • The food brought along on the journey spoiled. Rats and other bugs contaminated the food. The fresh water went bad.

  • It took over 2 months to travel between the European coasts to America’s Eastern Seaboard.

Travelers undertook this difficult and dangerous voyage because they believed that the unexplored land of North America would be a good place to settle.

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 1

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.



Different groups of travelers made this voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.

  • Some came for economic opportunity. Some thought they would find gold or a trade route to the Orient, but there was no gold. The waterways of the new world led deeper into the continent, not to far away continents.

  • Later groups did make money trading in items grown or made in North America like tobacco, metal tools, rice and cotton… even people. African and Native slaves were traded, bought and sold, too.

  • Travelers established settlements, and, later, colonies in places that provided many opportunities for survival. They chose land close to deep forests where they could hunt, along fresh-water rivers for drinking and cooking, near places for fishing and near deep water where they could anchor their ships.

  • Several tribes of Native American people already lived on this land. They knew how to hunt the animals in the forest, to plant crops of fresh food, to fish and trap sea life, to build homes that provided shelter and protection from the weather and to save food to be used during the cold winter.

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 2


Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

In Europe, many changes were occurring in established churches. King Henry VIII created the Church of England and required all of its citizens to worship there. Many people were unhappy and looked for ways to escape this law.



  • Some of the people who traveled to North America were looking for a place where they could worship in their own way.

  • The Puritans were the first group of travelers. They created the Plymouth Colony.

  • The Plymouth Colony was created just for Puritans. Other people were not allowed to own land or participate in the colony’s social or political life.

  • Later groups included Catholics, who settled in Maryland Colony and the Quakers, who settled in Pennsylvania Colony. These later colonies provided much more religious freedom to all men and women.

  • Religious freedom soon became an important belief among the colonists. Laws and other political decisions were made to include this important belief. Even now, Americans support the ideal of religious freedom!

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 3


Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

The Native people who already lived in North America belonged to different tribes. Some of the tribes were the Powhatan, the Algonquin, the Iroquois, the Wampanoag and the Mohicans.



  • The Native people did not know how to react to the arrival of the Europeans.

  • Some were friendly and were happy to share their food and their knowledge of how to live on the land. Some felt threatened and attacked these new arrivals.

  • The Native people were willing to trade their knowledge, food, clothing and furs for some of the things the European brought with them, such as glass, metal tools, beads and guns.

  • Most colonists believed that they were better than the Native people. They believed that they had the right to take away their land. Native people soon realized that the European settlers were taking over. As more and more settlements were built, Native hunting grounds disappeared and there were fewer places to grow crops. Diseases like Smallpox, Typhus and Cholera arrived with the settlers. The Indians had no immunity to these diseases, so many got sick and died.

  • War between the Indians and the colonists broke out. Many people died. European guns and other weapons gave the colonists victory over the Indians.

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 4


Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Building settlements, establishing colonies and expanding European life in North America was very difficult. Settlers had to learn how to grow crops that would survive in the American climate. They had to learn how to build homes that would provide shelter from the weather. They had to learn what life was like in this new land.



  • The Northern Colonies included Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. These colonies had long, cold winters. The land was rocky so it was difficult to grow crops.

  • The Middle Colonies included New York, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The climate in these colonies was mild. The growing season was longer and the land was fertile; it was much easier to grow crops.

  • The Southern Colonies included Virginia, Maryland, North and South Carolina and Georgia. These colonies were warm. The land was very fertile and the growing season was much longer. Large tracts of land were available to grow crops.

  • In all of the colonies, life was hard. Each climate created different problems. Where it was cold and snowy, sturdy houses were needed. Where it was warm and humid, mosquitos brought dangerous diseases. Fresh water was often difficult to find.

  • First colonists did not know how to grow crops, so many died of starvation. Many colonists belonged to the gentry; a wealthier class of people who expected others to do the work.

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 5


Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

As the settlers built and established these growing colonies, new beliefs about religious freedom and government grew too. These beliefs are the foundation of this country and the important documents and laws that allow us to live as the United States of America.



  • Puritans traveling as pilgrims in search of religious freedom wrote and signed The Mayflower Compact, a document that established a government in which the majority of voters (only Puritan men) are able to decide the rules that govern the way people will live. The settlers agreed to follow those rules for the sake of order and survival.

  • Later, the Puritans wrote and adopted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut that allowed more colonists, not just Puritan men, to vote and decide the rules. Both of these documents serve as the basis for the representative government we have in the United States today.

  • The Virginia House of Burgesses was an assembly of men who were chosen by the colonists to represent them in their colonial government. The men chosen as representatives were good men who lived a religious and virtuous life and were respected by their community. This assembly is the first example of representative government like our United States House of Representatives.

Region by region the colonies grew. From dreams to reality, there was much work to do.

Page 6


Glossary - http://www.merriam-webster.com

adopted

to accept formally and put into effect

Catholics

of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church

coast

the land along or near a sea or ocean

colony (ies)

an area that is controlled by or belongs to a country and is usually far away from it

disease (s)

an illness that affects a person, animal, or plant : a condition that prevents the body or mind from working normally

document

an official paper that gives information about something or that is used as proof of something

economic opportunities

an amount of time or a situation in which to relate to the process or system by which goods and services are produced, sold, and bought

government

the group of people who control and make decisions for a country, state, etc.

immunity

the power to keep yourself from being affected by a disease

journey

an act or instance of traveling from one place to another :  trip

majority

a number of votes that is more than half of the total number

Puritans

a member of a Protestant group in England and New England in the 16th and 17th centuries that opposed many customs of the Church of England

Quakers

a member of a Christian sect that stresses Inner Light, rejects sacraments and an ordained ministry, and opposes war

region

a part of a country, of the world, etc., that is different or separate from other parts in some way

religious freedom

the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in believing in a god or a group of gods and following the rules of a religion

representative government

having people who are chosen in elections to act or speak for or in support of the people who voted for them

settle

to move to a place and make it your home; settlement - a place or region newly settled

survive

to remain alive : to continue to live

trade

the activity or process of buying, selling, or exchanging goods or services

trade route

a route followed by traders (as in caravans); one of the sea-lanes ordinarily used by merchant ships

voyage

a long journey to a distant or unknown place especially over water

weapons

something (such as a gun, knife, club, or bomb) that is used for fighting or attacking someone or for defending yourself when someone is attacking you

worship

the act of showing respect and love for a god especially by praying with other people who believe in the same god : the act of worshipping God or a god













G

PICTORIAL INPUT – Jamestown Settlement




ELD Review Questions for Colonial Trade

Point to (targets ELPS beginning level):

  • Point to the Northern Colonies. (knowledge)

  • Point to the Jamestown Settlement. (knowledge)

  • Identify the colonial trade continents. (knowledge)

  • Look at the map of the United States. Are the 13 colonies on the eastern or western seaboard? Point to them. (knowledge)

  • (Show two pictures.) Which of these could be in the Middle Colonies? (application)

  • (Show a picture of Jamestown and Plymouth.) Point to the way the English settlers stayed safe. (application)


Yes/no (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  • Was Africa part of the trade triangle ? (knowledge)

  • Is Texas one of the original 13 colonies? (knowledge)

  • Were there plantations in the Northern Colonies? (comprehension)

  • Would a whaling trip (show picture) be planned from the Southern Colonies? (application)

  • Could you find iron tools in the Middle Colonies? (application)


Either/or (targets ELPS beginning and intermediate levels):

  • Are the 13 Colonies in Eastern North America or Western North America? (comprehension)

  • Would it be important to have ships available or not? (evaluation)

  • Is Plymouth a settlement or a colony? (analysis)

  • Was Pennsylvania a part of the Middle Colonies or the Northern Colonies? (knowledge)

  • Were plantations large farms or small farms? (knowledge)

  • Would you rather arrive in Jamestown or Plymouth? (Point to pictures.) (evaluation)

Open-ended questions (need to adjust expectations for answers based on students’ language levels, targets ELPS intermediate, advanced and advanced-high levels):

  • Provide examples of some products produced in the Northern Colonies. (comprehension)

  • Why do you think tobacco and cotton were better grown in the Southern Colonies? (analysis)

  • Why do you think the Europeans ended up in North America? (analysis)

  • In which of the 13 colonies would you prefer to live? Explain why. (evaluation)

  • Would you rather go whaling or work on a plantation? Explain why. (evaluation)

  • What do you think it is like to leave your country and move to another? (analyze)

  • How long do you think it would take to build a ship in colonial times? Why? (synthesize)
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