DLenm project glad colonial Regions and the Thirteen Colonies Austin Independent School District, 8th grade idea pages



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DLeNM Project GLAD

Colonial Regions and the Thirteen Colonies

Austin Independent School District, 8th grade

IDEA PAGES

  1. UNIT THEME: European exploration and colonization of North America -

  • Geographic factors influence historic events and contemporary issues

  • People adapt to and modify their environment

  • Societies are shaped by religious, legal and philosophical traditions

  1. FOCUS & MOTIVATION

  • Prediction-Reaction Guide

  • Observation Charts

  • Big Book: “Colonial Settlements and the Thirteen Colonies”

  • Cognitive Content Dictionary

  • Inquiry Chart

  • Read Aloud

  • Three Personal Standards and Scouts

  • Literacy Awards



  1. CLOSURE & ASSESSMENTS

  • Processing of All Charts

  • Learning Log

  • Home/School Connections

  • Portfolios

  • Individual Tasks

  • Team Presentations

  • Graffiti Wall

  • Jeopardy Game

  • Teacher-Student Made Tests

  • Teacher-made Test

  • Chapter Tests

  • Prediction-Reaction Guide (post)

  • Action Plan

  • Writing and Portfolio Rubrics



  1. CONCEPTS/STANDARDS: Social Studies, Grade - Austin ISD Curriculum Road Map: 2014, 1st 6 Weeks

(1)  History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history through 1877. The student is expected to:

    • (A)  identify the major eras and events in U.S. history through 1877, including colonization, revolution, drafting of the Declaration of Independence, creation and ratification of the Constitution, religious revivals such as the Second Great Awakening, early republic, the Age of Jackson, westward expansion, reform movements, sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction, and describe their causes and effects;

    • (B)  apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods; and

    • (C)  explain the significance of the following dates: 1607, founding of Jamestown; 1620, arrival of the Pilgrims and signing of the Mayflower Compact; 1776, adoption of the Declaration of Independence; 1787, writing of the U.S. Constitution; 1803, Louisiana Purchase; and 1861-1865, Civil War.

(2)  History. The student understands the causes of exploration and colonization eras. The student is expected to:

  • (A) identify reasons for European exploration and colonization of North America; and

  • (B)  compare political, economic, religious, and social reasons for the establishment of the 13 English colonies.

(3)  History. The student understands the foundations of representative government in the United States. The student is expected to:

  • (A)explain the reasons for the growth of representative government and institutions during the colonial period;

  • (B)  analyze the importance of the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, and the Virginia House of Burgesses to the growth of representative government; and

  • (C) describe how religion and virtue contributed to the growth of representative government in the American Colonies.

(7)  History. The student understands how political, economic, and social factors led to the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War. The student is expected to:

  • (C)  analyze the impact of slavery on different sections of the United States;

(10)  Geography. The student understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of the United States, past and present. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  locate places and regions of importance in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries;

  • (B)  compare places and regions of the United States in terms of physical and human characteristics; and

  • (C)  analyze the effects of physical and human geographic factors on major historical and contemporary events in the United States.

(11)  Geography. The student understands the physical characteristics of North America and how humans adapted to and modified the environment through the mid-19th century. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  analyze how physical characteristics of the environment influenced population distribution, settlement patterns, and economic activities in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries;

  • (C)  describe how different immigrant groups interacted with the environment in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

(12)  Economics. The student understands why various sections of the United States developed different patterns of economic activity. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  identify economic differences among different regions of the United States;

  • (B)  explain reasons for the development of the plantation system, the transatlantic slave trade, and the spread of slavery;

  • (D)  analyze the causes and effects of economic differences among different regions of the United States at selected times in U.S. history.



(15)  Government. The student understands the American beliefs and principles reflected in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and other important historic documents. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  identify the influence of ideas from historic documents, including the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Federalist Papers, and selected Anti-Federalist writings, on the U.S. system of government;

(23)  Culture. The student understands the relationships between and among people from various groups, including racial, ethnic, and religious groups, during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  identify selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups that settled in the United States and explain their reasons for immigration;

  • (C)  identify ways conflicts between people from various racial, ethnic, and religious groups were resolved;

  • (D)  analyze the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity; and

(25)  Culture. The student understands the impact of religion on the American way of life. The student is expected to:

  • (A)  trace the development of religious freedom in the United States;

  • (B)  describe religious motivation for immigration and influence on social movements, including the impact of the first and second Great Awakenings; and

  1. CONCEPTS/STANDARDS: English Language Arts, Grade 8 - Austin ISD Curriculum Road Map: 2014, 1st 6 Weeks

(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to adjust fluency when reading aloud grade-level text based on the reading purpose and the nature of the text.

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:



  • determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;

  • (B)  use context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or ambiguous words or words with novel meanings;

  • (D)  identify common words or word parts from other languages that are used in written English (e.g., phenomenon, charisma, chorus, passé, flora, fauna); and

  • (E)  use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.

(6)  Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

  • (A)  analyze linear plot developments (e.g., conflict, rising action, falling action, resolution, subplots) to determine whether and how conflicts are resolved;

  • (B)  analyze how the central characters' qualities influence the theme of a fictional work and resolution of the central conflict; and

  • (C)  analyze different forms of point of view, including limited versus omniscient, subjective versus objective.

(8)  Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the effect of similes and extended metaphors in literary text.

(9)  Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze works written on the same topic and compare how the authors achieved similar or different purposes.



(10)  Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

  • (A)  summarize the main ideas, supporting details, and relationships among ideas in text succinctly in ways that maintain meaning and logical order;

  • (B)  distinguish factual claims from commonplace assertions and opinions and evaluate inferences from their logic in text;

  • (C)  make subtle inferences and draw complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns; and

(14)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

  • (A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;

  • (B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;

  • (C)  revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;

  • (D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and

  • (E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

(15)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

  • (B)  write a poem using:

    • (i)  poetic techniques (e.g., rhyme scheme, meter);

    • (ii)  figurative language (e.g., personification, idioms, hyperbole); and

    • (iii)  graphic elements (e.g., word position).

(17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

    • (A)  write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:

    • (i)  presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;

    • (ii)  contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;

    • (iii)  is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;

    • (iv)  accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and

    • (v)  uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;

  • (B)  write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;

(19)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

  • (A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

  • (i)  verbs (perfect and progressive tenses) and participles;

  • (ii)  appositive phrases;

  • (iii)  adverbial and adjectival phrases and clauses;

  • (iv)  relative pronouns (e.g., whose, that, which); and

  • (v)  subordinating conjunctions (e.g., because, since);

  • (B)  write complex sentences and differentiate between main versus subordinate clauses; and

(20)  Writing/Conventions of Language/Handwriting. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

  • (A)  use conventions of capitalization; and

  • (B)  use correct punctuation marks, including:

  • (i)  commas after introductory structures and dependent adverbial clauses, and correct punctuation of complex sentences; and

  • (ii)  semicolons, colons, hyphens, parentheses, brackets, and ellipses.

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

(26)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:



  • listen to and interpret a speaker's purpose by explaining the content, evaluating the delivery of the presentation, and asking questions or making comments about the evidence that supports a speaker's claims;

  • follow and give complex oral instructions to perform specific tasks, answer questions, or solve problems; and

  • summarize formal and informal presentations, distinguish between facts and opinions, and determine the effectiveness of rhetorical devices.

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to advocate a position using anecdotes, analogies, and/or illustrations, and use eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, a variety of natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate productively in discussions, plan agendas with clear goals and deadlines, set time limits for speakers, take notes, and vote on key issues



  1. CONCEPTS/STANDARDS: English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS)
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