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The kids are right...

Edward Jackson

11/19/2011 7:14:19 PM






Discussion Question # 1: Who were the Hippies and how did they influence the culture of the 1960s?

Even though many Americans were enjoying Post World War II prosperity, there were many conflicting issues that were starting to bubble up throughout the country. 


The air was so thick with political tension you could cut it with a knife.  War had broken out in Vietnam, a war that many people had opposed.  Americans were
becoming increasing worried about the Cold War.  There was also a certain level of government oppression that was starting to come down on the youth of society.

So what happened?  Well something called the counterculture began to form.  It wasn’t just music, clothing or hair styles that defined the people that were a part of


this movement; it was more of a state of mind (which was freedom from the system, as it were). 

And the personality type that came to represent the counterculture (even though it really transcended just them) was the hippie.  The hippie was involved in marches,


protests, and sit-ins all over the country.  They represented free love, free thinking, and tried to break through some of the dusty, old traditions that had been
sanctioned by society.

Hippies were very important during their time because they inspired music, literature, clothing styles, and most importantly, a new way of thinking.  And, that was the


ideology of tolerance and acceptance for all people from all walks of life all while trying to separate from the system of control (which was seemingly capitalism). 
What’s really interesting is that even though the hippie message wasn’t accepted by everyone during the 1960s, you can definitely see their philosophy coming to
fruition in these modern times.



Discussion Question #2 Research and report on a current social movement that you think could be defined as a counter culture movement.

When first reading this task I thought about the Tea Party and Wall Street protests.  But comparing that to the movement in the 1960s just seemed


very shallow and superficial.  I came to the conclusion that even though nothing exists today like in the 1960s, there are still small forms of counterculture popping
up here and there.

You can usually see it with our younger generations.  There are the emos, goths, and punks…all driven by their own ideologies, clothing styles, hair styles, literature


and music.  The common thread amongst the hippies from the 60s and the emos, goths, and punks, is that they want to disconnect from the system of control.  
Whether that’s rebelling against their parents in the typical fashion or just not believing everything television and the government tells them to believe, the ideology
of freedom, freewill and free thinking is something that even the youth can understand; and thus a counterculture has been created.

Farber, D. (1994). The Age of Great Dreams, America in the 1960's. New York: Hill and Wang.

Veloso, Bryan, J.A. (n.d.). Counter Culture, Now and Then:. Retrieved November 19, 2011, from http://sdjekic.wordpress.com/counter-culture-now-and-then/

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net

Punks

Goths
 

 

emos











RE: The kids are right...

Edward Jackson

11/20/2011 12:10:44 PM





RE: The kids are right...

Edward Jackson

11/20/2011 12:10:44 PM






I also went through the goth phase, something I'm trying to forget now.  :-)

At the time I felt pretty lonely, and the goth lifestyle fit my emotions and life for that short period (a couple of years).

But going even beyond that now...I still question what I see happening around me.  I know some things we, as Americans, are doing are not right.  I know the government and society are a little hypocritical at times. 

There are many things we could be doing better in the way of civil rights and equality.  For the free'est country in the world, many citizens are slaves to poverty, poor health, and little to no education.

------------------------------------------------------------
Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net











RE: Who am I to say?

Edward Jackson

11/20/2011 12:29:46 PM






It's true what you said, "Freedom in our society should not be a battle over belonging as a human being!"  But life doesn't seem to work like we think it should, even in America.  There are bullies..ones that go way beyond just school and the internet.  How about Corporate America?  Corporate America is driven by the ideology of capitalism, enslaving many of us to just joining the ranks and complying to corporate policies and procedures (ruling in almost in a tyrannical fashion).  Usually we have to fall in line without question...and just do as we're told...Corporate America becoming the biggest bully of them all. 

Sometimes it feels like they're pushing us around and taking our lunch money.  But what can you do?  Corporations are king in this country.  I say we do what we can when we can to live up to our own expectations.  No one can tell you who are, or what you should become; a sort of masters of our own destinies.

------------------------------------------------------------
Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net








RE: "That's Jive Talk"

Edward Jackson

11/20/2011 1:20:51 PM






It's very interesting that people are once again questioning the boundaries that have been set before them (and I'm all for that).  Most of us are taught from a very young age to listen to authority and follow the rules, even if those rules don't always make sense.  But I don't agree with this philosophy.  If something is wrong, then you should question why we are doing it...or perhaps what we could do better.

I've been watching the Wall Street marches and really looking at the people that are there.  I wonder should it be considered counterculture?  It's definitely people questioning the rules...but the rules are really only about money and jobs.  The hippie movement shook the very foundation of our society and its beliefs, bringing clothing styles, hair styles, music, art, literature, and truly a new philosophy that possibly changed the course of history.  Now that's a movement.  Of course that's not to say that what the people are doing at Wall Street isn't important, because it is.  I'm just not sure if it's a counterculture, not yet anyway.

The real question is...would you or I have been a hippie during the 1960s?

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net








RE: The kids are right...

Edward Jackson

11/21/2011 2:24:42 PM






I believe they do it for several reasons. One to rebel. Nothing more rebellious and nothing more will get under a parent's skin than a child putting holes in their faces. And two, they want their outward appearance to reflect their inner turmoil. Apparently being a teenager is hard...and parents just don't understand. So kids do the only thing they know how to do, and that's express themselves through their appearances, which is easy compared to actually talking about it (in most cases they don't even know what's going on inside their own heads). I thought I knew everything when I was a kid, and all my choices were better than any adult was making. Of course this was a one-sided, flawed perception, of not really having experienced or knowing anything about the real world, as it were.

Kids do things like this because they don't know how to do anything else...and this is not their fault really.


------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net

Silly kids:










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