Discussion



Download 31.41 Kb.
Date conversion03.05.2016
Size31.41 Kb.




Discussion

Be sure to answer all of the questions in the thread in an in-depth, well- thought-out manner (150–200 words). Make at least two references to the course material. Engage in on-going, productive conversation with a minimum of three of your classmates throughout the unit. Remember that we will learn more by sharing ideas. Your grade will be based on how well your posts further the discussions by stimulating thought and understanding in others

Don’t forget to reference the ideas in your response to the course materials or other resources that you consulted to answer this question.



Civil Rights and Justice

Edward Jackson

11/12/2011 6:05:51 PM






Do you think that the Civil Rights Movements of the 1960s would have had the same impact if they had been led by Malcolm X instead of Martin Luther King?

The simple answer is No; the Civil Rights Movement would not have had the same impact if Malcolm X had been the face man or the spokesman of the movement. Malcolm X was a very important African-American of his time, very influential and stood up for the African-American community, however he wasn’t known for unity between the races. He wasn’t advocating integration and desegregation, more like he wanted justice against white America. Martin Luther King Jr. on the other hand wanted peace and harmony amongst the races, and preached of one day when all men could be equal. It’s what needed to be said…and it’s how things needed to be handled during that turbulent time.

Farber, D. (1994). The Age of Great Dreams, America in the 1960's. New York: Hill and Wang

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net

"If you can't fly, then run.


If you can't run, then walk.
If you can't walk, then crawl.
But whatever you do, keep moving."

-Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.








RE: White Privilege?

Edward Jackson

11/12/2011 7:10:32 PM






I found that article very interesting. I would have to say though I found many of the items listed to be misleading and could easily label any person of any color. Racism is just a small part under the umbrella of prejudice (which is really the larger problem). And we as Americans have perfected all the facets of prejudices. The judging of a person by the color of their skin or their culture are pretty common, albeit shallow, attempts to categorize people into understandable units in our society. 1960s were of course an explosive time in our history…where civil rights due to racism rose to the top.

The real problem I see now is that white or not, there are many people (I would say a majority) that don’t feel adequate enough…are being judged by such high level expectations that are being pushed to everyone in America. From not having enough education, not being professional or successful, to not looking young, thin and beautiful; we are all being affected by this current ideology. I’m white, but still feel like I’m not living up to standards that have been placed on me. I have many white friends that wouldn’t feel comfortable riding in the same car as a business man or woman, or my business friends not feel comfortable riding with my poor friends.

Racism is of course a topic that needs to tackled, but there is something far worse and it is prejudice. Prejudice can be more subtle and affect any person at any time. And when I look out into society now, that’s what I see. Rich people separated from the poor. Educated people separated from the less privileged.

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net








RE: White Privilege?

Edward Jackson

11/13/2011 10:58:55 AM







I have felt the exact same way, but under a different light. In my case, I didn't have a college degree compared to some of those around me. I was doing the exact same job and doing it much better than my peers, but never got a promotion and never really got recognized for all the hard work I was putting in. It was directly related to not having a degree; talk about feeling different! I'd thought I had been cheated (as this went on for almost 4 years). I ended up leaving that company.

So the real issue is like you said, discrimination...and of course what I said prejudice. How do why circumvent such ideology in the workplace as well as just general society? It’s tough because I think it’s a very human trait to look for things we understand…and then ostracized the things (or people) we don’t understand. We as Americans have found many new ways to discriminate and exercise prejudice against one another. But still, I have faith in us. I’m hoping we can rise to the occasion and make a better present for ourselves and a brighter future for our children.

------------------------------------------------------------
Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net







RE: Main Post

Edward Jackson

11/13/2011 11:17:50 AM






Malcolm X WAS an important leader during his time...and this is why. What white America had done to the African-American community was an atrocity. Of course the philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr. was more of a universal message of hope and working together to achieve desegregation. However, the message of Malcolm X wasn’t completely unfounded. When a criminal commits a crime, we throw them into prison…we punish them. So I think America got off pretty easy for the 200 hundred years of crimes committed against a race of people. MLK Jr. is what America needed…but I understand where Malcolm X was coming from.

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net





You're right; Malcolm X’s message was definitely more “forceful” and more aggressive. Martin Luther King Jr. really just wanted equality, whereas Malcolm X’s philosophy was more about supremacy. I didn’t live during that time, but I can understand both sides of the argument.

Sometimes you have to fight for what is right…and if you think about it…that’s the very spirit that this country was founded upon.

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net


RE: Martin or Malcolm

Edward Jackson

11/13/2011 11:26:05 AM






You're right; Malcolm X’s message was definitely more “forceful” and more aggressive. Martin Luther King Jr. really just wanted equality, whereas Malcolm X’s philosophy was more about supremacy. I didn’t live during that time, but I can understand both sides of the argument.

Sometimes you have to fight for what is right…and if you think about it…that’s the very spirit that this country was founded upon.

------------------------------------------------------------
Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net








RE: Civil Rights Movement

Edward Jackson

11/13/2011 11:46:28 AM






Yes I believe the Civil Rights would have turned out differently if Malcolm X was its leader instead of MLK Jr, but I really do wonder if it would have been better or worse.

Sometimes, especially in the founding of this country, violence must be met with violence. The founding fathers of this country were considered rebels against the British Authority, yet were well respected revolutionaries amongst Americans. Sometimes you have to fight for what you believe in. If MLK Jr. hadn’t come along, I’m not sure if the Civil Rights movement would have/could have even been stopped.

Americans have sought equality and freedom from the very beginning. And every time we try to persecute a people because of the color, culture, or even life styles for that matter, that group of people rises us and fights for the freedoms that are rightfully theirs.

------------------------------------------------------------


Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy Major
http://eddiejackson.net






The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page