Discussion Respond to the Discussion This unit contains two



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Discussion

Respond to the Discussion

  • This unit contains two Discussion Board questions.

  • Read the questions carefully so that you can post a response that addresses all aspects of each question.

  • You should also respond to at least two classmate’s postings for each thread; each response should contain a minimum of 100 words.

  • The Discussion Board grading rubric in the course syllabus will help you understand how this assignment will be graded.

Question 1:

Between 1920 and 1945 women experienced a great deal of change both privately and publically. Describe the new woman in politics. What are some of the key goals of the women’s movement in this era? What kind of legislation is proposed? Who are the key women of this era and why? Answer those questions, and then think about which woman you feel most connected to and tell us why.





The age of new women

Edward Jackson

12/8/2012 7:47:31 PM






What are some of the key goals of the women’s movement in this era?
After World War I, and many women getting their first taste of what it meant to work outside the home, women wanted more.  Women wanted to contribute to society.  Women wanted to do fulfilling work like men.  And it seemed women were winning after the landmark victory of the Amendment 19, giving women the right to vote.  So after that particular victory, women began looking for what was next; and that was equality in job and career opportunities, and pay.

What kind of legislation is proposed?
With the victory of the 19th amendment, women began looking for what was next.  There was a lot of legislation to follow; some of it was good and some of it was bad.  You had the Sheppard-Towner Act which gave funds for infant health information in 1921.  The Equal Rights Amendment was introduced in 1923.  In 1932, the National Economy Act (which was more to the detriment of women’s rights) was passed in 1932; this led to thousands of women being laid off.  Even more legislation was to follow with the New Deal (from FDR in 1933); though most of the New Deal programs, once again, seem to fail women.  The legislation that followed the New Deal, the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), actually did do more for women equality by creating new policies for wages and hours. (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012)
   
Who are the key women of this era and why?
Some of the key women of this era were Alice Paul, Mary Van Kleeck, Julia Lathrop, Frances Perkins, and Addie Hunton.  Paul was the founder of the National Woman’s Party, which continued to press forward with women’s equality (like through the ERA). Kleech fought for standards in women’s employment, which due to the disparity, was needed. Julia Lathrop and Frances Perkins were social reformers extending women’s legal rights. And last, but not least, Addie Hunton.  Hunton, a field secretary for the NAACP, fought for African American women’s rights.  She was needed because, on many levels, African American women were being excluded from the battle and victories of the period (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012).

Answer those questions, and then think about which woman you feel most connected to and tell us why.
I feel most connected to Alice Paul.  Why?  Because she was serious about her cause, made consistent progress, and devoted her life towards women’s rights.  I like successful people, and I consider Paul successful; I consider myself successful.  It’s not so much what you do in life, as it is how you do it…and Paul did it to the best of her ability, just like I do.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/alice-paul-loc-1915-228x250.jpg









RE: Women in Politics

Edward Jackson

12/8/2012 8:24:31 PM






I too like Alice Paul.  She founded the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage in 1913 (which becomes the National Women’s Party in 1917), introduced the Equal Rights Amendment, and spent her whole life dedicated to women’s rights.  She was definitely an iconic, historical figure in women’s history and in American history for that matter.  I believe the Equal Rights Amendment was only proposed in 1923, not actually enacted.  You won’t believe this, but it took until 1972 to get it back into Congress where 35 of the required 38 states voted yes. So, that basically still leaves us with 3 states that are needed for the ERA to become an Amendment.  I have said it before, and I will say it again, America needs to get with the program.  The majority of all the other industrialized nations have equaled the playing field when it comes to male/female equality in the workplace.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/era(5).jpg









RE: Initial Post

Edward Jackson

12/8/2012 9:46:18 PM






Ah, times seemed to be on the upswing for women.  The 19th Amendment, the NWP, the Roaring Twenties, the flappers, things really seemed to be favoring women and their pursuit of equality.  One person you mentioned, which I think is well-underrated, is Eleanor Roosevelt.  People forget just how well loved she was by the general public, and especially by women; she was truly a strong woman of her time.

But, the good times (as they were) did not last.  The stock market crashes, banks fail, international business policies fail…and sent America spiraling into a depression. Women’s rights of course suffered because of this.  FDR did what he could (which was as much as could have been asked of any good president) to bring America out of the depression.  But in 1941, America joined the world war – which is attributed to pulling us out the depression.  With this action, men went to war, and the government called on women in a big way.  This is where women and their cause for equality were once again launched into full action.


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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/Women_aluminum_shells_wwii.jpg








Question 2:

View the following link: http://www.nps.gov/pwro/collection/website/home.htm

Read the introduction, and pick a few of the women’s stories to read closely. Then view the Training Women for War Production video. A transcript for the video is available in Doc Sharing

Rosie the Riveter is an important figure for women politically and socially. During WWII women began to experience meaningful changes associated with the expansion of women’s rights. This included more and more women leaving the domestic sphere and entering the working world.



Women stepping up

Edward Jackson

12/9/2012 5:34:30 PM






Why did women work in these situations?
Ah, World War II, such an interesting time in American History.  Just before the war...the Great Depression was pretty much pummeling most Americans.  Times were not good.  FDR did what he could, but it still wasn’t enough.  It would take the U.S. entering the war in 1941 to pull us out of the depression.  Many jobs were created due to the fact that men were being drafted and being sent to war overseas.  First, the demand for war production caused many factories to open back up and go into full swing.  And then, of course, women worked as mechanics, welders, clerks, telephone operators, etc.  And, because there was the need and pressure from women’s groups, the WAC (Woman’s Army Corps) recruited 140,000 women; women were in high demand during these times (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012).

How did working affect their lives and the way they felt about themselves?
Even though women were moving more and more into all the job roles traditionally held by men, the perception of conventional women’s roles was still an obstacle.  Nonetheless, no matter what society thought, the government needed women---and needed them in a big way.  So, propaganda like Rosie the Riveter circulated, and pulled woman out of their households into factories, offices, and even into war (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012).

Once women were there (outside the household), they felt like they were contributing---to society and the war movement.  During this time, a whopping 5 million women entered the workforce; it was good times for women.  Whatever skills that women may have lacked before and during the great depression, they made up for tenfold during WWII.



How did the women of the Progressive era pave the way for these women to enter the workplace?
The woman of the Progressive Era set the tone and minimum set of standards that would be accepted and tolerated in the workplace by women.  Eight hour day work hours, better salaries, and suitable working conditions, were all made possible from the women of the Progressive Era (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012).

Dubois, E.C. & Dumenil, L. (2012). Through women’s eyes (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/dothejobheleftbehind.jpg









RE: DB 2

Edward Jackson

12/9/2012 6:21:15 PM






I totally agree, WWII gave women the independence and sense of fulfillment that they had sought after for so long.  The roles of women did change…from managing households…to 5 million women entering the workforce doing pretty much all types of jobs.  What I find very interesting is all the propaganda that “Uncle Sam” was publishing.  From Rosie the Riveter, to popular magazines like the Saturday Evening Post, there was an outreach to women to strengthen the overall war effort (DuBois & Dumenil, 2012).

And, the walls of female subjugation were beginning to be torn down.  Of course, even with the war effort, even with the monumental services provided by women, there was still a certain societal perception about women and their traditional roles---which shortly after WWII, came back.  But because women had such a huge impact, and because women refused to go back just as housewives, things would never be the same again.

Dubois, E.C. & Dumenil, L. (2012). Through women’s eyes (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.
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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/ARTV01064.jpg









RE: Unit 5 DB 2

Edward Jackson

12/9/2012 6:55:27 PM






You touched on something…that was really the biggest problem during the turn of century (and still is for that matter in the higher job positions); the idea of working women didn’t seem beneficial.  The traditional female role of being solely a homemaker was being challenged.  It started in the mid-1800s, continued into the Progressive Era, and was still well underway in the 1940s.  Women were no longer content with just being housewives.  WWII really brought out some of the best in women.  Women proved they could do almost any task (even ones that had been filled by men).  Mechanics, welders, machine operators, clerks, teachers, nurses, and they were directly involved in the battle side of war through WAC and WASP.  Women were beneficial then, and come to find out, were beneficial in the long run.

Dubois, E.C. & Dumenil, L. (2012). Through women’s eyes (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Philosophy Major/Liberal Studies
http://eddiejackson.net  university page

http://eddiejackson.net/web_images/waac_poster.jpg










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