Discussion 1 of 2



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Discussion 1 of 2
Affirmative action attempts to remedy the injustice of racial and sexual discrimination. When asked to justify their position, supporters of affirmative action commonly appeal to its effects on living individuals of our society's long history of past discrimination. Other point to current patterns of discrimination. Would the regents be correct to conclude that, in light of these considerations, Katie Sampson's proposal should be rejected?


Do you agree that all affirmative action policies create unjust reverse discrimination? If not, which specific forms of affirmative action do you think escape this charge, and why do you think this?


Discussion 1 Edward Jackson 4/7/2011 9:46:12 PM


I do agree that affirmative action policies do create a form of reverse discrimination. However, America is quite well-known for its past transgressions, especially when it comes to discrimination in the workplace, and we need laws to address such business practices. I have had many jobs throughout my career and sometimes I witnessed a “status-quo” person being hired instead of the most qualified. And I asked myself is this fair? Should quotas be filled? And the answer is simple, the answer is yes. Why you ask? Because American business isn’t about the little man, at least not anymore, it’s about the rich and powerful, and the only way we can keep them honest is to force them to recognize that hiring practices should be honest, fair, and most of all diverse.

Through affirmative action we can accomplish just that. If you walk into a law firm where there are hundreds of lawyers, and you happen to notice they are all white males in their mid-30’s, I can almost guarantee you that the rich and powerful are leveraging their weight against the social classes as they were.

As far as Katie Sampson is concerned, I DO THINK that her proposal should be rejected. Affirmative action combats discrimination and it is America’s penance for its past sins. I don’t believe Katie has the right to take that away from those who may need it most.

Thiroux, J, & Krasemann, K. (2009). Ethics: Theory and Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student
http://eddiejackson.net



RE: Unit 6 Discussion Edward Jackson 4/7/2011 9:58:03 PM

I completely understand the competive edge. But what if a business seeks out a certain demographic, because that's what they like? Because they do not care about filling quotas, they only care about their bank accounts. How is this fair? So the question comes down to, how can we the people, protect everyone's best interest? Well, we can't. It's either going to be pro-business, or pro-employee. Personally, I'm leaning towards pro-employee, after all, it's employees that make up businesses anyway.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student
http://eddiejackson.net



RE: Unit 6 Discussion Edward Jackson 4/8/2011 7:26:11 AM



Totally agree with you Eric. America really does still have some growing up to do.

A few passages from our book about free enterprise, which makes complete sense to me: "The only ethical way to conduct business is to put it in the hands of the government, which operates for the good of everyone. This system allows everyone to share equally in the good and the bad, eliminating the uneven distribution that exists under free enterprise".

I believe the only way we're going to solve many of America's problems is to break up the social classes and more evenly distribute what we consider to be most important to us; which are education, healthcare, and great jobs that lead to great careers.

Money right now is the driving force of most companies, it's the bottom line, it's all about the numbers (we've all heard these statements). The problem with this is that money (the greed thereof) is cold and calculated, and insensitive to the needs of the people. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with making money, but you should never do it at the expense of the people themselves. And this is happening every day in America. It causes jobs to be outsourced. It causes discrimination. And just like our book says, aggression and competition bring out the worse in people.

Thiroux, J, & Krasemann, K. (2009). Ethics: Theory and Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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Eddie Jackson

GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student

http://eddiejackson.net









Discussion 2 of 2

Discussion 2 Edward Jackson 4/10/2011 10:14:06 AM




Why do people and companies cheat?

I believe the reasons why people cheat is because it's a shortcut; shortcuts to popularity, money, to escape blame and responsibility for one's own actions.

Cheating is usually the easiest path you can take. I believe it is ethically wrong because it not only eats-away at your integrity as a person or a company, but also can cause damage to personal and professional relationships.

What damage is caused by cheating?

Per our book, it shatters the trust needed for the continuance and survival of human relationships. But most of all, it really is the cheater that morally and ethically has deceived themselves. Even if they somehow got ahead by cheating, psychologically, it is a ticking time bomb. Our books states that cheaters can become lazy, and I completely agree with that idea.

If a person is taking all the shortcuts throughout life, how will they learn to do something properly? They won’t. So eventually, they’ll be asked to do something that they won’t be able to prove they know how do; how embarrassing will that be? The moral and ethical thing to do is to do it right the first time, and not cheat your way through it.

What ethical principles can be considered in relationship to cheating?

Principles in relationships range from breaking promises to social trust and personal integrity. I don’t really make promises, just because of the mere weight I believe promises should have. I say, "I’ll try to do that", or "we’ll see what happens", or "let’s play it by ear".

How have you dealt with this issue in your life?

Personally, I do things right the first time. Whether it is taxes, schoolwork, self-studies, to paying the bills; I always try to think about the ramifications of my actions and how they affect me and those around me. In the long run, it really is the best ideology to follow. As far as dealing with cheaters, I definitely have come across some people I have caught cheating, and my advice to them is always the same-I tell them to do the right thing.

Thiroux, J, & Krasemann, K. (2009). Ethics: Theory and Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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Eddie Jackson

GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student

http://eddiejackson.net

RE: To Cheat or not to Cheat - Traci L Suddeth Edward Jackson 4/10/2011 10:27:59 AM



I totally agree with you, money does seem to be the most popular reason why people and businesses cheat. I wonder why? Money has become the driving factor in most businesses and has somehow crept into our personal lives. America has become consumed with the almighty dollar. So much so, that I really think we are beyond the stopping point now. Are there ways we can stop cheating, especially in businesses? Maybe. Perhaps accountability to the public would help...we could do this through state and federal regulation. As far as cheating in people's personal lives, educating everyone on the ramifications of their actions is probably the best approach.

Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student
http://eddiejackson.net


RE: Cheating Edward Jackson 4/12/2011 8:35:16 PM

I agree with you, if the person doesn't wish to take the time to learn, then I don't feel like I should help them. I get asked for shortcuts to certifications, or inside information of what will be on a certification exam. I always tell them no, no and no. It's crazy people really do expect something for nothing. I think cheaters may somehow make it to the top, but it's just a matter of time before they get caught, or asked to prove what they're supposed to know. Cheating does not pay off in the long run.

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Eddie Jackson
GOK - Liberal Studies/Philosophy student
http://eddiejackson.net











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