Directions: Your answer to the following question must be based on the accompanying documents and your understanding of the historical era Outside Knowledge



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APUSH

Darnell


DBQ: Jacksonian Democrats were Guardians of the Constitution?

Directions:

Your answer to the following question must be based on the accompanying documents and your understanding of the historical era (Outside Knowledge). In your essay, you should refer to relevant historical facts and developments not mentioned in the documents, as well as ideas found in the documents. When/where relevant to your interpretation, incorporate founding ideals, historical themes and historiographical interpretations. As you analyze each document, take into account both the source and author’s point of view/perspective/bias. In no case should documents simply be summarized. You must incorporate a minimum of 6 documents into your essay in order to receive maximum points.


Historical Background:

Jacksonian Democrats viewed themselves as “the guardians of the United States Constitution.” They believed the Democratic-Republicans (and the short-lived National Republicans) strayed from the Jeffersonian belief that the role of the federal government was to protect individual rights and had adopted a more Hamiltonian view of using government to empower the wealthy capitalist class. They pledged to increase political democracy, protect individual liberty, and secure equality of economic opportunity.


Essay Prompt:

In light of the following documents and your knowledge of the 1820s and 1830s, to what extent do you

agree with the Jacksonians’ view of themselves as “guardians of the Constitution”?

Out of Class Preparation:


  1. AVMS All docs

  2. Create a TOT

    1. Translate the Question

    2. Organize your response (see chart below)

    3. Write your Thesis

  3. Create a chart like below ORGANIZING your evidence with your category of analysis/arguments.

Evidence Source Category of Analysis/Arguments

Outside Knowledge


Political

Economical

Geographical

Social

Documents














Document A

Source: Alexis de Tocqueville. Democracy in America. (1835)

“Amongst the novel objects that attracted my attention during my stay in the United States, nothing struck me more forcibly than the general equality of condition among the people. I readily discovered the prodigious influence which gives a peculiar direction to public opinion, and a peculiar tenor to the laws: it imparts new maxims to the governing authorities, and peculiar habits to the governed.”

Document B

Source: Sarah Grimke. Legal Disabilities of Women. (1838)

“There are few things which present greater obstacles to the improvement and elevation of women to her appropriate sphere of usefulness and duty, than the laws which have been enacted to destroy her independence, crush her individuality; laws which, although they are framed for her government, she has had no voice in establishing, and which rob her of some of her essential rights.”

Document C

Source: John C. Calhoun. Fort Hill Address. (1831)

“The great and leading principle is, that the General Government emanated from the people of the several States, forming distinct political communities, and acting in their separate and sovereign capacity, and not from all the people forming one aggregate political community . . . the Constitution of the United States is, in fact, a compact, to which each state is a party . . . This right of . . . nullification . . . I conceive to be the fundamental principle of our system . . .”

Document D

Source: Andrew Jackson. Bank Veto Message. (1832)

“Is there no danger to our liberty and independence in a bank that in its nature has so little to bind it to our country? . . . Every monopoly and all exclusive privileges are granted at the expense of the public . . . It is not conceivable how the present stockholders can have any claim to the special favor of the Government.”

Document E

Source: Theodore D. Weld. Slavery As It Is. (1839)

Reader, you are empanelled as a juror to try a plain case and bring in an honest verdict. The question at issue is not one of law, but of fact—“What is the actual condition of slaves in the United States?” A plainer case never went to a jury. Look at it. TWENTY-SEVEN HUNDRED THOUSAND persons in this country, men, women, and children, are in SLAVERY. Is slavery, as a condition of human beings, good, bad, or indifferent? We submit the question without argument.”

Document F

Source: Henry Clay. Addressing Congress. (1826)

“[Indians are] essentially inferior to the Anglo-Saxon race . . . and their disappearance from the human family will be no great loss to the world.”

Document G

Source: Grolier’s Presidential Election Results



Election Year Candidate Electoral Votes Popular Votes Popular % U.S. Population

1824

Jackson

99

153, 544

42

9,638,453




J. Q. Adams

84

108,740

32







Crawford

41

46,618

13







Clay

37

47,136

13






















1828

Jackson

178

647,292

56







J. Q. Adams

83

507,730

44






















1832

Jackson

219

688,242

54.5

12,866,020




Clay

49

473,462

37.5







Floyd

11

….

….







Hart

7

101,051

8






















1836

Van Buren

170

764,198

51







Harrison

73

549,508

37







White

26

145,352

9







Webster

14

41,287

3







Magnum

11

….

….






















1840

Harrison

234

1,275,612

53

17,069,453




Van Buren

60

1,130,033

47





Document H

Source: Frank Weitenkampf, ”King Andrew the First,” 1833king andrew jackson bw





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