Dining Board Meeting Thursday, February 24th, 2011 Sevy Meeting Room Members Present



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Dining Board Meeting

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

Sevy Meeting Room
Members Present: Alex Dunn ’11, Katie McKenna, Michael Delcambre, Ben Hellerstein ’12, Dan Bergeson, Ned Heckman ‘13
Guests Present: Dan Watrin, Michele Hesterberg ’11, Alex Lai ’13

Dan Watrin, Executive Sous Chef – Market Report:

Dan went over the 02/24/2011 Market Report, the report is attached.



What do other commercial places do (restaurants) when there are supply shortages? They shop outside of North America. For example, they may make a deal with a Brazilian farmer for a certain amount of Brazilian tomatoes.
Comments:

Why do we not have more fish? Fish is a high demand. Canada owns the name “Walleye” and there are only about 3 lakes in Canada that it comes from.
Can there be more Rye and Whole Grain Bread? Paul said he usually does bread that corresponds with the menu. He said he’d get more out.
What happened to tacos? Tacos will be back again starting next week!
Chai Tea - It’s on rotation, if they’re talking about the machine Chai Tea, it will be coming back.
Turkey Burgers – There was a couple comments, some like the old ones, some like the new ones better.
Sweet Potato Fries – Vale is working on homemade sweet potato fries.
Keep the newspapers around – They try to keep them until they’re soiled and/or stained.
Is the ice cream frozen yogurt or ice cream? It’s frozen yogurt.
The cookies are great, soft as they should be.
Creamy tomato basil dressing was good.
Thank you for the veggie burgers again.
Where is the whole grapefruit? Grapefruit is on the salad bar, cut in half. The whole ones were walking out of the dining room.
Goat Milk – please never get rid of it.
Get soy yogurt - Bon Appétit will look into it, they’re not sure there is soy yogurt.
Please have more Indian food.
Burton knocked my socks off this week - loved the fried chicken steak.
Can there be fresh mozzarella? No.
Chinese food was good.

There were a lot of good comments on the curly fries.
Bring back salsa in LDC for breakfast - It will be back.
Michelle and Alex - Tray-less Tuesday Survey Results:

Michelle and Alex will be presenting a resolution to CSA in 10th week. The resolution says they will continue with Tray-less Tuesdays this year and move to everyday in the fall of 2011. Resolution and survey results attached.

Dan Watrin expressed concern with the trays being more self-serve and visible rather than having the student worker stop serving to go get a tray for someone that wants one. This will be discussed and will do some experimenting Spring Term. It may be possible to keep some behind various stations. Michelle and Alex will continue with communication and awareness.
Next Meeting:

Thursday, April 7th, 2011, Noon – 1:00 pm, in LDC/’51


Respectfully Submitted,

Kelly Roehl

Market Report


  • Row crop items will be in short supply over the next week. These items are foods such as zucchini, squash, lettuces, peppers ect.

  • Most supply shortages are due to freezing weather in Mexico and Southwestern USA.

  • Spring Mix lettuces as well as spinach will be in short supply due to freezing.

  • Mexico farmers are reporting 60%-100% loss on peppers, cucumbers, squashes, beans, chilies, tomatoes and egg plant.

  • Domestic honeydews are very limited as well as green grapes

  • Rain and cold temps in California and the southwest are keeping farmers from getting into fields and planning and planting the spring harvest of produce. These weather conditions will remain for most of the week.

  • Beef prices will continue to rise due to shrinking inventory and time it takes to grow herds. The reason for shrinking inventory is mostly due to fee prices. Corn is the biggest with more going toward ethanol production.

  • Pork: bacon and pork belly prices are high and in short supply due mostly to increased demand from fast food restaurants.

As always the spring weather is the greatest unknown. Storms, flooding and cold temperatures can play a major factor on the produce market. Unusual snow fall in the plains states may have effect on grain supplies which may raise feed prices, driving livestock prices higher. We are currently seeing record prices for livestock. Fuel prices affect all food commodities. Analysts predict that oil prices will rise with unrest in the Middle East and the current moratorium on domestic oil drilling.


What does this mean to us? Bon Appetit will not sacrifice our commitment to the highest quality food and food preparation. We will maintain the diversity, freshness and quality that our guests expect. With this said, we must become creative in our purchasing and preparation. When certain foods go up we must reduce our usage and/or eliminate certain products. For instance we may reduce the overall amount of tomatoes when the price goes beyond a certain price point. At that point we may put out another item to make up for the difference. When the market swings the other way and prices come down (which it always does) we will then go back to offering normal amounts.

A Resolution Concerning Trayless Dining at Carleton
Whereas, Trayless Tuesdays reduced food waste by approximately 20 percent on Tuesdays in LDC in Fall of 2010, according to measurements by Bon Appetit; and
Whereas, Reducing food waste through trayless dining would save money that would be put back into the dining program in order to continue to improve the quality of the program for Carleton students; and
Whereas, Reducing food waste through trayless dining could help reduce Carleton’s carbon footprint as Carleton has committed to do in the President’s Climate Commitment, since food production is responsible for 30 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions; and
Whereas, Over 90 percent of respondents indicated that Carleton’s environmental consciousness is somewhat or very important to them in the STA’s Winter 2011 Trayless Survey, written and designed in cooperation with Carleton’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment; and
Whereas, The Environmental Advisory Committee, President Poskanzer, and the Residential Life Sustainability Committee recommend that Carleton transition completely to trayless dining; and
Whereas, Trayless dining has been implemented at hundreds of schools, including many schools similar to Carleton that also use Bon Appétit such as Oberlin College and Colorado College; and
Whereas, Over 90 percent of respondents in the STA’s Winter 2011 Trayless Survey would support, be okay with or have no preference about continuing Trayless Tuesdays; and
Whereas, Approximately 70 percent of respondents in the STA’s Winter 2011 Trayless Survey would support, be okay with or have no preference about going trayless every day; and
Whereas, Over 500 Carleton students signed a petition in support of the college’s transition to trayless dining in Fall Term 2010; now, therefore be it
Resolved, That the CSA Senate advises that the College and Bon Appétit continue Trayless Tuesdays in the LDC; and
Resolved, That the CSA Senate advises that the College and Bon Appétit remove trays from the LDC for every meal every day starting in Fall 2011 (but continue to provide trays to those who ask for them); and
Resolved, That the CSA Senate encourages the STAs to continue to educate students about food waste, going trayless, and their option to get a tray in the LDC; and
Resolved, That the CSA Senate encourages the College and Bon Appétit to continue to consider options that would make it possible to remove trays from Burton Dining Hall.

Trayless Survey Results

By Michelle Hesterberg & Alex Lai


In order to more accurately gauge how the Carleton community feels about going trayless, the Sustainability Assistants designed a survey in collaboration with Carleton’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment. We asked every 15th person who entered the dining hall to stop and fill out the survey so that we would get a random sample of the Carleton students, faculty, staff, and visitors who eat in the dining hall. Diners were surveyed at every meal for two days in Burton and two days in the LDC. We collected 339 surveys, and the following is a summary of the results of the survey.
HABITS AND BELIEFS

In response to whether they considered environmental consciousness not important at all, not that important, somewhat important, or very important, 90.3% of survey respondents considered environmental consciousness somewhat or very important.

We also asked survey respondents whether they ever voluntarily went trayless in Carleton’s dining halls, and, if so, how often (rarely, occasionally, sometimes, often, or almost always/always). 69.1% of respondents said they voluntarily go trayless. Given a choice of reasons for why they voluntarily go trayless (easier, eat a more appropriate amount of food, less waste, more sustainable), the most popular reason was that it is easier, followed by eating a more appropriate amount, wasting less food, and finally being more sustainable.
SUPPORT FOR CONTINUING TRAYLESS TUESDAYS

88.7% of respondents said they noticed Trayless Tuesdays in the LDC. We asked respondents whether they supported continuing Trayless Tuesdays, did not have a preference one way or the other, didn’t support Trayless Tuesdays but would be okay with it as a means of decreasing food waste, or didn’t support Trayless Tuesdays. 51.9% said they supported continuing Trayless Tuesdays, 23.8% said they did not have a preference one way or the other, 15.8% said that they did not support Trayless Tuesdays but would be okay with continuing them as a means of decreasing food waste, and 8.3% did not support continuing Trayless Tuesdays.


SUPPORT FOR GOING TRAYLESS EVERYDAY

We asked respondents whether they supported going trayless everyday, did not have a preference one way or the other, didn’t support going trayless everyday but would be okay with it as a means of decreasing food waste, or didn’t support going trayless everyday. 30.3% said they either supported going trayless everyday, 21.7% said they did not have a preference one way or the other, 18.4% did not support going trayless every day but would be okay with doing so as a means of decreasing food waste, and 29.7% did not support going trayless everyday.

OTHER FACTORS IN TRAYLESS SUPPORT

There was a statistically significant difference in support of both Trayless Tuesdays and going trayless everyday among different levels of support of environmental consciousness. Respondents who said that environmental consciousness was not that important or not important at all were less in favor of both continuing Trayless Tuesdays and going trayless everyday than were those who said that environmental consciousness was somewhat or very important.



Respondents from the class of 2014 were the most supportive of both continuing Trayless Tuesdays and going trayless everyday; support decreased in 2013 and 2012, and 2011 respondents were the least supportive. For continuing Trayless Tuesdays, the most popular response was “supportive” for all class years. For going trayless everyday, however, respondents from 2013 and 2014 most often chose “supportive,” while respondents from 2012 and 2011 most often chose “not supportive.”

Students and faculty/staff did not have a statistically significant difference in support for either Trayless Tuesdays or going trayless everyday. The sample size of respondents who said they were visitors was too small to compare.

Among different meal plans (5, 10, 12, 20) and different dining hall preferences (whether respondents ate mostly at Burton, mostly at LDC, or about the same), there was also no statistically significant difference in support for either continuing Trayless Tuesdays or going trayless everyday.
CONCLUSIONS

Environmental consciousness is generally considered to be a popular concern of Carleton students, and our survey confirms that. One implication of that is that Carleton students ought to be willing to make small sacrifices like going trayless as part of that commitment, and these data show that the members of the Carleton community who are interested in the environment are more willing to go trayless, as well as that Carleton students and faculty/staff as a whole are also willing to go trayless. While not all said that they were in support of going trayless, either on Tuesdays or everyday, many were impartial or willing to accept it: over 90% would be at least okay with continuing Trayless Tuesdays, and 70% would be at least okay with going trayless everyday. First-year students were more supportive than seniors of continuing Trayless Tuesdays, but otherwise support was consistent among other class years, meal plans, dining halls, and students and faculty/staff. The results of our survey show that the Carleton community is ready to make small changes in habits in accordance with our environmental consciousness.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Thanks to the Environmental Advisory Committee, the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment for their collaboration in creating the survey, all those who looked over the survey before it was implemented, STAs and other volunteers who administrated the survey, Chris Remley and Martha Larson for data analysis, and Martha also for general support.



If you have any questions or comments, please email Michelle (hesterbm@carleton.edu) or Alex (laia@carleton.edu).




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