Developed by Paige Hall Smith, University of North Carolina at Greensboro



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Women’s Experiences with Battering (WEB) Scale

Developed by Paige Hall Smith, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Here are 10 statements that other women have used to describe their lives with their partners. Please read each statement and circle the answer that best describes how much you agree or disagree with each. Answer the questions thinking about your current (or your most recent) partner.

Item

Strongly


Agree

Somewhat agree

Agree a little




Disagree a little

Somewhat disagree

Strongly disagree

  1. He makes me feel unsafe even in my own home.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I feel ashamed of the things he does to me.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I try not to rock the boat because I am afraid of what he might do.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I feel like I am programmed to react a certain way to him.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I feel like he keeps me prisoner.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. He makes me feel like I have no control over my life, no power, no protection.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I hide the truth from others because I am afraid not to.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. I feel owned and controlled by him.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. He can scare me without laying a hand on me.

1

2

3

4

5

6

  1. He has a look that goes straight through me and terrifies me.

1

2

3

4

5

6



Notes:

  1. Battering is defined as women’s continuous perceptions of susceptibility to physical and psychological danger, loss of power and control in a relationship with a male partner.

  2. The WEB Scale can be made gender-neutral by changing “he” to “my partner”. It has not been validated with male victims of female violence or same-sex battering.

  3. The numbers can be reversed when administered so that Strongly agree = 6 and Strongly disagree = 1.


To score:

1. If the items are administered so that Strongly Agree = 1 then reverse score the items [so that 1=6, 2=5, 3=4, 4=3, 5=2, and 6=1] and then sum.

2. If the items are administered so that Strongly Agree = 6 then sum.

3. The range is from 10 – 60 so that higher scores mean higher psychological vulnerability (i.e. more battered).



4. If you want to dichotomize the scores, the women who score < = 19 are not battered; women who score 20+ are battered.

Women’s Experiences with Battering (WEB) Scale: Selected Publications

Publications 1-3 are based on P.H. Smith’s dissertation


  1. Smith, P.H., Tessaro, I., and Earp, J.A. (1995). Women's experience with battering: a conceptualization from qualitative research. Women's Health Issues, 5, 197-182.




  1. Smith, P.H., Earp, J.A., and DeVellis, R. (1995). Measuring battering: development of the Women’s Experience with Battering (WEB) Scale. Women’s Health: Research on Gender, Behavior, and Policy, 1(4), 273-288.



  1. Smith, P.H., Smith, J.B. and Earp, J.A. (1999). Beyond the measurement trap: a reconstructed conceptualization and measurement of battering. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 23: 179-195.


Publications 4-6 are based on a study in a health care setting


  1. Coker, A.L., Smith, P.H., McKeown, R.E. and Remsburg, M.J. (2000). Frequency and correlates of intimate partner violence: physical, sexual and psychological battering. American Journal of Public Health, 90, 553-559.



  1. Coker, A.L., Smith, P.H., Bethea, L, Remsburg, M.J. and McKeown, R.E. (2000). Physical health consequences of physical and psychological intimate partner violence. Archives of Family Medicine, 9: 451-457.




  1. Coker, A.L., Pope, B.O., Smith, P.H. and Hussey, J.R. (2001). Assessment of clinical partner violence screening tools. Journal of the American Medical Women’s Association. Winter: 19-23.




Publication 7 is a population-based study


  1. Smith, P.H., Thronton, G., DeVellis, R., Earp, E., & Coker A. (2002) Prevalence and distinctiveness of battering, physical assault and sexual assault in a population-based sample. Violence Against Women, 8 (10), 1209-1232.


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