Detailed Reading List



Download 207.81 Kb.
Page2/2
Date conversion21.02.2016
Size207.81 Kb.
1   2
60(6): 908-927. Factors affecting survival or demise.

  • Robnett, B. (1996). “African-American Women in the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965: Gender, Leadership, and Micromobilization.” American Journal of Sociology 101(6): 1661-1693.

  • McCarthy, John D.; Wolfson, Mark "Resource Mobilization by Local Social Movement Organizations: Agency, Strategy, and Organization in the Movement against Drinking and Driving" American Sociological Review; 1996, 61, 6, Dec, 1070-1088.

  • Cress, Daniel M.; Snow, David A. "Mobilization at the Margins: Resources, Benefactors, and the Viability of Homeless Social Movement Organizations" American Sociological Review; 1996, 61, 6, Dec, 1089-1109.

  • Tarrow, Power in Movement, Chapter 3.

  • Edwards, B. and M. Foley (2003). “Social Movement Organizations beyond the Beltway: Understanding the Diversity of One Social Movement Industry.” Mobilization 8(1): 87-107.

  • Van Dyke, N. (2003). “Crossing Movement Boundaries: Factors That Facilitate Coalition Protest by American College Students, 1930-1990.” Social Problems 50(2): 226-250.

    B. FRAMES, IDENTITIES, EMOTIONS, ETC.



    1. Overviews of social psychological approaches and debates. These are articles which discuss the advantages and disadvantages of instrumentalist and constructionist social psychologies. My own view is that some of the authors construct false dichotomies and straw men, but the issues are well worth engaging.

      1. David A. Snow and Pamela E. Oliver. "Social Movements and Collective Behavior: Social Psychological Dimensions and Considerations." In Karen Cook, Gary Fine, and James House, eds., Sociological Perspectives on Social Psychology. Allyn and Bacon. A comprehensive review of social psychological issues, including networks, personality, socialization, instrumentalism, and constructionism.

    The following grew out of the same conference and are in Morris and Mueller, Frontiers of Social Movement Theory. (MM) They are all reviewing various approaches to the problem of the construction of movement ideologies.

      1. Bert Klandermans. 1992. "The Social Construction of Protest and Multiorganizational Fields." MM

      2. William A. Gamson. 1992. "The Social Psychology of Collective Action." BC 487-504. MM

      3. Sidney Tarrow. 1992. "Mentalities, Political Cultures, and Collective Action Frames: Constructing Meanings Through Action." MM

      4. Myra Marx Ferree. 1992. "The Political Context of Rationality: Rational Choice Theory and Resource Mobilization." MM

      5. David A. Snow and Pamela E. Oliver. "Social Movements and Collective Behavior: Social Psychological Dimensions and Considerations." In Karen Cook, Gary Fine, and James House, eds., Sociological Perspectives on Social Psychology. Allyn and Bacon. A comprehensive review of social psychological issues, including networks, personality, socialization, instrumentalism, and constructionism.

      6. Goodwin, Jeff. "The Libidinal Constitution of a High-Risk Social Movement: Affectual Ties and Solidarity in the Huk Rebellion, 1946-1954" American Sociological Review; 1997, 62, 1, Feb, 53-69.

      7. Snow, David A.; Cress, Daniel M.; Downey, Liam; Jones, Andrew W. Disrupting the "Quotidian": Reconceptualizing the Relationship between Breakdown and the Emergence of Collective Action. Mobilization; 1998, 3, 1, Mar, 1-22. Theoretical piece which reworks breakdown theory in cultural and symbolic interaction terms. Significant.




    1. Emotions (also see Passionate Politcs listings)

      1. Goodwin, J. (1997). "The Libidinal Constitution of a High-Risk Social Movement: Affectual Ties and Solidarity in the Huk Rebellion, 1946-1954." American Sociological Review 62(1): 53-69.

      2. Goodwin, J., J. M. Jasper, et al. (2000). "The Return of the Repressed: The Fall and Rise of Emotions in Social Movement Theory." Mobilization 5(1): 65-84.

      3. Snow, D. A., D. M. Cress, et al. (1998). "Disrupting the "Quotidian": Reconceptualizing the Relationship between Breakdown and the Emergence of Collective Action." Mobilization 3(1): 1-22.

      4. Turner, R. H. (1996). "The Moral Issue in Collective Behavior and Collective Action." Mobilization 1(1): 1-15.

      5. Eric Hirsch. “Sacrifice for the Cause: Group Processes, Recruitment, and Commitment in a Student Social Movement.” MS 303-311 ASR 55: 243-254. 1990.

      6. Verta Taylor and Nancy Whittier. “Collective Identity in Social Movement Communities: Lesbian Feminist Mobilization.” BC 505-523.

      7. Cadena-Roa, J. (2002). “Strategic Framing, Emotions, and Superbarrio-Mexico City's Masked Crusader.” Mobilization 7(2): 201-216.

      8. Gould, D. B. (2002). “Life during Wartime: Emotions and the Development of ACT UP.” Mobilization 7(2): 177-200.

      9. Kim, H. (2002). “Shame, Anger, and Love in Collective Action: Emotional Consequences of Suicide Protest in South Korea, 1991.” Mobilization 7(2): 159-176.

      10. Hagan, J. (2001). “Cause and Country: The Politics of Ambivalence and the American Vietnam War Resistance in Canada.” Social Problems 48(2): 168-184.

      11. Perry, E. J. (2002). “Moving the Masses: Emotion Work in the Chinese Revolution.” Mobilization 7(2): 111-128.



    1. Frames, Discourses & construction

      1. Bert Klandermans. 1988. "The Formation and Mobilization of Consensus." International Social Movement Research 1: 173-196. [cites Kriesi 1986 that NSM are rooted in dense countercultural networks and thus can have loose structures. cf CRM] consensus mob is the creation of shared views of movement issues (vs action mob to act); on purpose by movt. New belief system. cite Snow, need for congruence. Wide-ranging review of functionalist requirements for content of ideologies and sources of communication and credibility. Example of decline in opinion after counter-campaign. Useful overview.

      2. *David Snow et al., "Frame Alignment Processes," ASR 51 (1986): 464-481. The first and most influential piece: movement actors try to bring their movement's frame into alignment with other's ideas so that they will join or support the movement. in MS & BC. Also JSTOR.

      3. David Snow and Robert Benford. 1988. "Ideology, Frame Resonance, and Participant Mobilization." International Social Movement Research 1: 197-217. framing tasks and constraints on framing. nice review of analytic dimensions of ideology.

      4. *Robert Benford. 1993. "Frame Disputes within the Nuclear Disarmament Movement." Social Forces 71: 677-702. Debates inside the peace movement about how they would view their issue and present themselves to others.

      5. *David Snow and Robert Benford. 1992. "Master Frames and Cycles of Protest." In Morris and Mueller, Frontiers of Social Movement Theory. How broad frames like "rights" characterize protest cycles. BC 456-472.

      6. Hank Johnston. "Antecedents of Coalition: Frame Alignment and Utilitarian Unity in the Catalan Anti- Francoist Opposition." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13: 241-259. 1991. Broad unity among Catholics and Marxists and among different ethnic groups and classes arose as four frame alignment processes converged on a master frame.

      7. Myra Marx Ferree. "Political Strategies and Feminist Concerns in the Untied States and Federal Republic of Germany: Class, Race and Gender." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13: 221-240. 1991. US feminism guided by race analogy, while Germany feminism by the conflict between gender and class politics. Discourses around employment policy, reproductive rights, and women in military vary; political culture important.

      8. km-3. Jane Jenson. "Changing Discourse, Changing Agendas: Political Rights and Reproductive Policies in France." Talk about alliances, content of debates for 3 issues (inter-war suffrage, inter-war birth control, 1970s abortion). no explicit research methodology but lots of talk about whose ideas were connect to whose, and distinctions, subdivisions. useful.

      9. Rita Noonan. “Women Against the State: Political Opportunities and Collective Action Frames in Chile’s Transition to Democracy.” MS 252-267. Sociological Forum 10: 81-111. 1995.

      10. Stephen Ellingson. “Understanding the Dialectic of Discourse and Collective Action: Public Debate and Rioting in Antebellum Cincinnati.” American Journal of Sociology 101: 100-144. 1995. MS 268-280.

      11. Moaddel, M. (1992). “Ideology as Episodic Discourse: The Case of the Iranian Revolution.” American Sociological Review 57(3): 353-379.

      12. Diani, Mario "Linking Mobilization Frames and Political Opportunities: Insights from Regional Populism in Italy" American Sociological Review; 1996, 61, 6, Dec, 1053-1069.

      13. Babb, Sarah"A True American System of Finance": Frame Resonance in the U.S. Labor Movement, 1866 to 1886. American Sociological Review; 1996, 61, 6, Dec, 1033-1052.

      14. "What a Good Idea: Frames and Ideologies in Social Movements Research." (Pamela E. Oliver and Hank Johnston) Mobilization: An International Journal 5 (1 April) 2000: 37-54. A copy of this article + Snow & Benford’s reply and our rejoinder are posted on my web page.

      15. Tarrow, Power in Movement, chapter 7.

      16. Gamson, W. A. and D. S. Meyer (1996). Framing Political Opportunity. CP: 273-290. The perception of political opportunity is framed.

      17. McAdam, D. (1996). The Framing Function of Movement Tactics: Strategic Dramaturgy in the American Civil Rights Movement. CP: 338-355. A summary of the civil rights movement as strategic dramaturgy. The key is that tactics are frames and there are frames about tactics, that a key were battles over the interpretation of tactics as legal or illegal, moral or immoral.

      18. McCarthy, J. D., J. Smith, et al. (1996). Accessing Public, Media, Electoral, and Governmental Agendas. CP Concerned with specifying the social structural contexts that condition movement framing efforts, and condition the repertoires of tactics within these structures. Groups with more resources tend to use more "insider" tactics. The article links the agenda-setting literature with ideas of strategy and tactics.

      19. Oberschall, A. (1996). Opportunities and Framing in the Eastern European Revolts of 1989. CP: 93-121. Framing processes determine the perception of political opportunities. Case histories of the anti-communist revolutions in Poland, Hungary, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. Emphasizes crowds rather than organizations in the revolts.

      20. Zald, M. N. (1996). Culture, Ideology, and Strategic Framing. CP: 261-274. Six different issues relevant to culture, ideology, and framing, developed from a useful summary of existing literature.

      21. Zdravomyslova, E. (1996). Opportunities and Framing in the Transition to Democracy: The Case of Russia. CP: 122-137. Describes the phases of the Leningrad revolt, stressing shifts in police responses over time, and the changing frames and tactics of the movement as it grew in strength. Police initially repress.

      22. Myra Marx Ferree. "Political Strategies and Feminist Concerns in the Untied States and Federal Republic of Germany: Class, Race and Gender." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13: 221-240. 1991. US feminism guided by race analogy, while Germany feminism by the conflict between gender and class politics. Discourses around employment policy, reproductive rights, and women in military vary; political culture important.

      23. km-8. Myra Ferree. "Equality and Autonomy: Feminist Politics in the United States and West Germany." difference in type, each is strong in ways, weak in ways. US liberal, Germany radical.

      24. km-3. Jane Jenson. "Changing Discourse, Changing Agendas: Political Rights and Reproductive Policies in France." Talk about alliances, content of debates for 3 issues (inter-war suffrage, inter-war birth control, 1970s abortion). no explicit research methodology but lots of talk about whose ideas were connect to whose, and distinctions, subdivisions. useful.

      25. Griggs, S. and D. Howarth (2002). “An Alliance of Interest and Identity? Explaining the Campaign against Manchester Airport's Second Runway.” Mobilization 7(1): 43-58.

      26. McCammon, H. J. (2001). “Stirring Up Suffrage Sentiment: The Formation of the State Woman Suffrage Organizations, 1866-1914.” Social Forces 80(2): 449-480. Frames more important than political opportunities in explaining state suffrage.

      27. Munson, Z. (2001). “Islamic Mobilization: Social Movement Theory and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.” The Sociological Quarterly 42(4): 487-510.

      28. Reese, E. and G. Newcombe (2003). “Income Rights, Mothers' Rights, or Workers' Rights? Collective Action Frames, Organizational Ideologies, and the American Welfare Movement.” Social Problems 50(2): 294-318.

      29. Westby, D. L. (2002). “Strategic Imperative, Ideology, and Frame.” Mobilization 7(3): 287-304. A theoretical piece unpacking "frame"

    C. POLITICAL OPPORTUNITIES, POLITICAL STRUCTURES, POITICAL DYNAMICS & STRATEGIC INTERACTION




    1. State-Movement Interactions

      1. Gary Marx. 1979. "External Efforts to Damage or Facilitate Social Movements: Some Patterns, Explanations, Outcomes, and Complications." In Mayer Zald and John D. McCarthy, The Dynamics of Social Movements. (He also has an old 1975 AJS article on agents provocateurs etc.) An inventory of methods. also BC 360-384.

      2. Hanspeter Kriesi, Ruud Koopmans, Jan Wilhem Duyvendak, Marco G. Giugni, “New Social Movements and Political Opportunities in Western Europe.” MS 52-65. European Journal of Political Reserach 22: 219-244. 1992.

      3. J. Craig Jenkins and Charles Perrow. “Insurgency of the Powerless: Farm Worker Movements (1946-1972). MS 37-51. ASSR 42: 249-268. 1977.

      4. Steven Barkan. “Legal Control of the Southern Civil Rights Movement.” MS 384-396. American Sociological Review 49: 552-565. 1984.

      5. Kim, Q. Y. (1996). “From Protest to Change of Regime: The 4-19 Revolt and the Fall of the Rhee Regime in South Korea.” Social Forces 74(4): 1179-1209.

      6. A collection with some useful comparative essays on new social movements in Europe is Russell J. Dalton and Manfred Kuechler, eds. Challenging the Political Order.

      7. Paul Burstein. Legal Mobilization as a Social Movement Tactic: The Struggle for Equal Employment Opportunity. American Journal of Sociology 1991, 96, 5, Mar, 1201-1225. Data are EEO cases: relation between mobilization and grievances is problematic, blacks are central, resources are critical.

      8. *Elisabeth S. Clemens. Organizational Repertoires and Institutional Change: Women's Groups and the Transformation of U.S. Politics, 1890-1920. American Journal of Sociology 1993, 98, 4, Jan, 755-798. Because women couldn't vote, they created new forms of politics leading to the educational lobbying system prominent today.

      9. Susan Harding. 1985. "Reconstructing Order Through Action: Jim Crow and the Southern Civil Rights Movement." In Charles Bright and Susan Harding eds 1984 Statemaking and Social Movements. Process of recreating social rules. old order effectively prohibited black collective action. Movement changes polity.

      10. *John D. McCarthy, David Britt, and Mark Wolfson. "The Institutional Channeling of Social Movements by the State in the United States." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13: 45-76. 1991. Tax laws, postal regulations, etc. channel SMOs into legal, tame formations.

      11. *Amenta, E., K. Dunleavy, et al. (1994). “Stolen Thunder? Huey Long's "Share Our Wealth," Political Mediation, and the Second New Deal.” American Sociological Review 59(5): 678-702.

      12. *Amenta, Edwin, Bruce G. Carruthers, Yvonne Zylan. “A Hero for the Aged? The Townsend Movement, the Political Mediation Model, and U.S. Old-Age Policy, 1934-1950.” American Journal of Sociology 98: 308-399. 1992.

      13. Amenta, E. and M. P. Young (1999). "Democratic States and Social Movements: Theoretical Arguments and Hypotheses." Social Problems 46(2): 153-168. Theorizes the impact of democratic states on the mobilization of state-oriented challengers, as well as the forms of their mobilization & collective action. US state, comparatively speaking, has discouraged & continues to discourage social mobilization.

      14. Andrews, Kenneth T "The Impacts of Social Movements on the Political Process: The Civil Rights Movement and Black Electoral Politics in Mississippi". American Sociological Review; 1997, 62, 5, Oct, 800-819.

      15. Markoff, J. (1997). "Peasants Help Destroy an Old Regime and Defy a New One: Some Lessons from (and for) the Study of Social Movements." American Journal of Sociology 102(4): 1113-1142. A dataset of 4,689 rural insurrectionary events, drawn from a literature review, are used to examine interactions of elites and insurrectionary mobilization, shaping each other.

      16. Soule, S. A., D. McAdam, et al. (1999). "Protest Events: Cause or Consequence of State Action? The U.S. Women's Movement and Federal Congressional Activities, 1956-1979." Mobilization 4(2): 239-255. More consequence than cause

      17. For a good set of articles on the institutionalization of protest, see Meyer & Tarrow The Social Movement Society: Contentious Politics for a New Century

      18. Tarrow, Power in Movement, Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5

      19. Policing Protest in France and Italy: From Intimidation to Cooperation? Donatella della Porta Olivier Fillieule, and Herbert Reiter Meyer & Tarrow, eds, SMS

      20. Della Porta, D. (1996). Social Movements and the State: Thoughts on the Policing of Protest. CP: 62-92. Changes in the policing of protest, detailed case information on Italy and Germany. Her main point is the need for an interactive model, as the state changes in response to movements as much as movements change in response to the state.

      21. Kriesi, H. (1996). The Organizational Structure of New Social Movements in a Political Context. CP: 152-184. Theory & typologizing on state-movement interactions.

      22. Rucht, D. (1996). The Impact of National Contexts on Social Movement Structures: A Cross-Movement and Cross-National Comparison. CP: 183-204. How national contexts affect movement structures. Compares the women's and environmental movements in France, West Germany, and the US. He argues that there are distinct national differences in political contexts, but that it is also clear that the structures change across time within countries, and argues that these changing structures are what should be meant by opportunities.

      23. Tarrow, S. (1996). States and Opportunities: The Political Structuring of Social Movements. CP: 41-61. Develops a typology of state-building as a source of social movements, giving examples from the US, France, etc. Critiques the idea of the political opportunity structure as one thing.

      24. Voss, K. (1996). The Collapse of a Social Movement: The Interplay of Mobilizing Structures, Framing, and Political Opportunities in the Knights of Labor. CP: 227-258. Argues the Knights lost not because they were weak but because organized employers were strong.

      25. Dalton, R. J. (1995). Strategies of Partisan Influence: West European Environmental Groups. The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 296-323. 69 groups in 10 countries, compare relations to parties.

      26. Kriesi, H. (1995). The Political Opportunity Structure of New Social Movements: Its Impact on Their Mobilization. The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 167-198. discussion of different characteristics of states which help or hinder movements; western Europe.

      27. Maguire, D. (1995). Opposition Movements and Opposition Parties: Equal Partners or Dependent Relations in the Struggle for Power and Reform? The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 199-228. discusses why movements & parties need each other and what the dangers are.

      28. Nollert, M. (1995). Neocorporatism and Political Protest in the Western Democracies: A Cross-National Analysis. The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 138-164. Comparisons. Argues that neocorporatist states not only meet needs, but repress protest.

      29. km-int Katzenstein. "Comparing the Feminist Movements of the United States and Western Europe: An Overview." broad-ranging. consciousness, political alliances, nature of state. comparative overview. Useful.

      30. Joyce Gelb. 1990. "Feminism and Political Action." In Russell J. Dalton and Manfred Kuechler, eds., Challenging the Political Order, pages 137-155. Compare US, Britain, Sweden in how women's movt functions, relative to polity and culture. Useful.

      31. km-11. Mary Ruggie. "Workers' Movements and Women's Interests: The Impact of Labor-State Relations in Britain and Sweden." Feminists are marginalized in British labour politics, central in Swedish. Causes and consequences.

      32. Jo Freeman. "Whom You Know versus Whom You Represent" km-10. History of US women's movement and its relation to parties across time. Title refers to post-1960 differences between Reps and Dems. Very useful if you want to understand the US (including movements other than women's).

      33. McCammon, H. J., K. E. Campbell, et al. (2001). “How Movements Win: Gendered Opportunity Structures and U.S. Women's Suffrage Movements, 1866 to 1919.” American Sociological Review 66(1): 49-70.

      34. O'Brien, K. J. (2003). “Neither Transgressive nor Contained: Boundary-Spanning Contention in China.” Mobilization 8(1): 51-64.

      35. Olzak, S., M. Beasley, et al. (2003). “The Impact of State Reforms on Protest against Apartheid in South Africa.” Mobilization 8(1): 27-50.



    1. Countermovements

      1. Mayer N. Zald and Bert Useem. "Movement and Countermovement Interaction: Mobilization, Tactics, and State Intervention." In Mayer N. Zald and John D. McCarthy, eds., Social Movements in an Organizational Society.

      2. Tahi Mottl. “The Analysis of Countermovements.” Social Problems 27 (June 1980): 620-635. Countermovements are more likely to have state and/or elite support. Movements and countermovements take turns capturing different segments of the state. BC 408-423.

      3. James Jasper and Jane Poulsen. “Fighting Back: Vulnerabilities, Blunders, and Countermobilization by the Targets in Three Animal Rights Campaigns.” MS 397-406. Sociological Forum 8: 639-657. 1993.

      4. Meyer, D. S. and S. Staggenborg (1996). “Movements, Countermovements, and the Structure of Political Opportunity.” American Journal of Sociology 101(6): 1628-1660.

      5. Andrews, K. T. (2002). “Movement-Countermovement Dynamics and the Emergence of New Institutions: The Case of "White Flight" Schools in Mississippi.” Social Forces 80(3): 911-936.

      6. Fetner, T. (2001). “Working Anita Bryant: The Impact of Christian Anti-Gay Activism on Lesbian and Gay Movement Claims.” Social Problems 48(3): 411-428.

      7. Werum, R. and B. Winders (2001). “Who's "In" and Who's "Out": State Fragmentation and the Struggle over Gay Rights, 1974-1999.” Social Problems 48(3): 386-410.




    1. Cycles, Movements Over Time, Regime-Movement Interactions

      1. Sidney Tarrow. Power in Movement. Tarrow has written a great deal about cycles of protest. At some point you should read his book. Par III, Dynamics (chapters 9, 10, 11) are relevant here.

      2. Sidney Tarrow. “Cycles of Collective Action: Between Moments of Madness and the Repertoire of Contention.” Social Science History 17: 2 (Summer) pages 281-308. 1993. MS 328-339.

      3. Sidney Tarrow. “Cycles of Protest.” BC 441-456. reprints a selection from Power in Movement.

      4. Ruud Koopmans. The Dynamics of Protest Waves: West Germany, 1965 to 1989. American Sociological Review 1993, 58, 5, Oct, 637-658. Cycles of protest in Europe; action repertoires diverge in response to repression. Ruud Koopmans. “The Dynamics of Protest Waves: West Germany, 1965-1989.” MS 367-383.

      5. Koopmans, Ruud Dynamics of Repression and Mobilization: The German Extreme Right in the 1990s. Mobilization; 1997, 2, 2, Sept, 149-164.

      6. McAdam, Doug (1983). “Tactical Innovation and the Pace of Insurgency.” American Sociological Review 48(6): 735-754. MS 340-356.

      7. Frank, A. G. and M. Fuentes (1994). “On Studying the Cycles in Social Movements.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 17: 173-196.

      8. Minkoff, Debra C. "The Sequencing of Social Movements." American Sociological Review; 1997, 62, 5, Oct, 779-799. Pop ecology model of diffusion of movements.

      9. Whittier, Nancy "Political Generations, Micro-Cohorts, and the Transformation of Social Movements". American Sociological Review; 1997, 62, 5, Oct, 760-778. Cohort replacement and movement change.

      10. Markoff, John "Peasants Help Destroy an Old Regime and Defy a New One: Some Lessons from (and for) the Study of Social Movements" American Journal of Sociology; 1997, 102, 4, Jan, 1113-1142. Quantitative analysis of elite-movement interaction.

      11. Rasler, Karen "Concessions, Repression, and Political Protest in the Iranian Revolution" American Sociological Review; 1996, 61, 1, Feb, 132-152. Quantitative analysis of interactions between protest and state actions.

      12. Hedstrom, P., R. Sandell, et al. (2000). "Mesolevel Networks and the Diffusion of Social Movements: The Case of the Swedish Social Democratic Party." American Journal of Sociology 106(1): 145-172.

      13. Democratic Transitions as Protest Cycles: Social Movement Dynamics in Democratizing Latin America, Patricia L. Hipsher SMS

      14. McCammon, H. J. (2003). “"Out of the Parlors and into the Streets": The Changing Tactical Repertoire of the U.S. Women's Suffrage Movements.” Social Forces 81(3): 787-818. Tactical change was a response to disarray and failure.

      15. Titarenko, L., J. D. McCarthy, et al. (2001). “The Interaction of State Repression, Protest Form and Protest Sponsor Strength during the Transition from Communism in Minsk, Belarus, 1990-1995.” Mobilization 6(2): 129-150.




    1. Outcomes

      1. Joseph Gusfield. "Social Movements and Social Change: Perspectives of Linearity and Fluidity." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 4: 317-339. 1981. Argues for looking for the cultural and indirect influences of movements.

      2. David S. Meyer and Nancy Whittier. “Social Movement Spillover.” Social Problems 41: 277-298. 1994. MS 480ff.

      3. William Gamson. “The Success of the Unruly.” MS 357-364. From The Strategy of Social Protest.

      4. Burstein, P., R. L. Einwohner, et al. (1995). The Success of Political Movements: A Bargaining Perspective. The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 275-295.

      5. Cress, D. M. and D. A. Snow (2000). “The Outcomes of Homeless Mobilization: The Influence of Organization, Disruption, Political Mediation, and Framing.” American Journal of Sociology 105(4): 1063-1104.

      6. Andrews, K. T. (2001). “Social Movements and Policy Implementation: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the War on Poverty, 1965 to 1971.” American Sociological Review 66(1): 71-95. Movement infrastructure led to greater anti-poverty expenditures.

      7. Burstein, P. and A. Linton (2002). “The Impact of Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Social Movement Organizations on Public Policy: Some Recent Evidence and Theoretical Concerns.” Social Forces 81(2): 380-408.

      8. Hasso, F. S. (2001). “Feminist Generations? The Long-Term Impact of Social Movement Involvement on Palestinian Women's Lives.” American Journal of Sociology 107(3): 586-611

      9. Isaac, L. and L. Christiansen (2002). “How the Civil Rights Movement Revitalized Labor Militancy.” American Sociological Review 67(5): 722-746.

      10. Jacobs, D. and R. Helms (2001). “Racial Politics and Redistribution: Isolating the Contingent Influence of Civil Rights, Riots, and Crime on Tax Progressivity.” Social Forces 80(1): 91-121.

      11. McAdam, D. and Y. Su (2002). “The War at Home: Antiwar Protests and Congressional Voting, 1965 to 1973.” American Sociological Review 67(5): 696-721.




    1. Economic factors

      1. Van Dyke, N. and S. A. Soule (2002). “Structural Social Change and the Mobilizing Effect of Threat: Explaining Levels of Patriot and Militia Organizing in the United States.” Social Problems 49(4): 497-520.

    D. OTHER TOPICS




    1. Media and Movements

      1. William Gamson and Andre Modigliani. 1989. "Media Discourse and Public Opinion on Nuclear power: A Constructionist Approach." American Journal of Sociology 95: 1-37. Analysis of media frames across time + qualitative citing of trends in survey data. GOOD.

      2. William A. Gamson, David Crotequ, William Hoynes, and Thodore Sasson. "Media Images of the Social Construction of Reality." Annual Review of Sociology 1992, 18: 373-93. literature review on media frames, how viewers/readers interpret them.

      3. Todd Gitlin. "News as Ideology and Contested Area: Toward a Theory of Hegemony, Crisis, and Opposition." A synopsis of the main theoretical argument of his book The Whole World is Watching, about media coverage of SDS in the 1960s.

      4. Harvey Molotch. 1979. "Media and Movements." Pp. 71-93 in Zald and McCarthy, The Dynamics of Social Movements. How the media operate and why they provide distorted views of movements.

      5. Erich Goode and Nachman Ben-Yehuda. "Moral Panics: Culture, Politics, and Social Construction." Annual Review of Sociology 20: 149-71. 1994. not located in social movements literature but addressing issues of the media and elite construction of moral revivals, etc.

      6. McCarthy, J. D., C. McPhail, et al. (1996). “Images of Protest: Dimensions of Selection Bias in Media Coverage of Washington Demonstrations, 1982 and 1991.” American Sociological Review 61(3): 478-499.

      7. John D. McCarthy. “Activists, Authorities, and Media Framing of Drunk Driving.” LJG 133-167.

      8. Pamela E. Oliver and Daniel J. Myers. "How Events Enter the Public Sphere: Conflict, Location and Sponsorship in Local Newspaper Coverage of Public Events." American Journal of Sociology 105: 38-87. 1999.

      9. "Political Processes and Local Newspaper Coverage of Protest Events: From Selection Bias to Triadic Interactions" (Pamela E. Oliver and Gregory M. Maney) American Journal of Sociology 106 (2 September) 2000: 463-505.

      10. Mueller, Carol. "International Press Coverage of East German Protest Events, 1989" American Sociological Review; 1997, 62, 5, Oct, 820-832. Comparison of six nations' coverage in light of media selection models.

      11. Mueller, Carol Media Measurement Models of Protest Event Data. Mobilization; 1997, 2, 2, Sept, 165-184.

      12. Hug, Simon; Wisler, Dominique Correcting for Selection Bias in Social Movement Research. Mobilization; 1998, 3, 2, Oct, 141-161.

      13. Sampedro, Victor The Media Politics of Social Protest. Mobilization; 1997, 2, 2, Sept, 185-205. Spain, media opportunities usually coincide with political opportunities, but sometimes there is a chance in the media.

      14. Roscigno, V. J. and W. F. Danaher (2001). "Media and Mobilization: The Case of Radio and Southern Textile Worker Insurgency, 1929 to 1934." American Sociological Review 66(1): 21-48.

      15. Smith, J., J. D. McCarthy, et al. (2001). "From Protest to Agenda Building: Description Bias in Media Coverage of Protest Events in Washington, D.C." Social Forces 79(4): 1397-1423. Protest coverage focus on events, not issues, may undermine movement agendas.

      16. Tarrow, Power in Movement, Chapter 3.

      17. Klandermans, B. and S. Goslinga (1996). Media Discourse, Movement Publicity, and the Generation of Collective Action Frames: Theoretical and Empirical Exercises in Meaning Construction. CP: 312-337. Detailed theoretically-grounded case of a class of media frames (or political icons, using Szasz’s term)

      18. Davenport, C. and M. Eads (2001). “Cued to Coerce or Coercing Cues? An Exploration of Dissident Rhetoric and Its Relationship to Political Repression.” Mobilization 6(2): 151-171.

      19. Rohlinger, D. A. (2002). “Framing the Abortion Debate: Organizational Resources, Media Strategies, and Movement-Countermovement Dynamics.” The Sociological Quarterly 43(4): 479-507.



    1. International/Transnational Movements

      1. Mara Loveman. "High-Risk Collective Action: Defending Human Rights in Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina." American Journal of Sociology; 1998, 104, 2, Sept, 477-525. Activism depends on strategies of repression, embedded networks, and international ties.

      2. Tarrow, Power in Movement, Chapter 11.

      3. Jackie Smith (Editor), Charles Chatfield (Editor), Ron Pagnucco (Editor). Transnational Social Movements and Global Politics : Solidarity Beyond the State (Syracuse Studies on Peace and Conflict Resolution) Paperback (October 1997) Syracuse Univ Pr

      4. Margaret E. Keck, Kathryn Sikkink. Activists Beyond Borders : Advocacy Networks in International Politics. Paperback - Cornell Univ Pr;

      5. Transnational Advocacy Networks in the Movement Society, Margaret E. Keck and Kathryn Sikkink Meyer & Tarrow, eds, SMS

      6. Thomas Risse-Kappen (Editor). Bringing Transnational Relations Back in : Non-State Actors, Domestic Structures and International Institutions. (Cambridge Studies in International relations). Paperback (November 1995. Cambridge Univ Pr

      7. Smith, J. (1995). “Transnational Political Processes and the Human Rights Movement.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 18: 185-219.

      8. Franklin D. Rothman and Pamela Oliver. "From Local to Global: The Anti-Dam Movement in Southern Brazil, 1979-1992." . Mobilization: An International Journal 4 (1 April) 1999.

      9. Hanagan , Michael Irish Transnational Social Movements, Deterritorialized Migrants, and the State System: The Last One Hundred and Forty Years. Mobilization; 1998, 3, 1, Mar, 107-126

      10. McAdam, D. and D. Rucht (1993). “The Cross-National Diffusion of Movement Ideas.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 528: 56-74.

      11. Boudreau, V. (1996). "Northern Theory, Southern Protest: Opportunity Structure Analysis in Cross-National Perspective." Mobilization 1(2): 175-189. Modifying political opportunity theory to apply to developing countires.

      12. Caniglia, B. S. (2001). "Informal Alliances vs Institutional Ties: The Effects of Elite Alliances on Environmental TSMO Networks." Mobilization 6(1): 37-54. Effects of elites vary depending upon network structures. Reprinted in Smith & Johnston, Globalization & Resistance.

      13. Chabot, S. (2000). "Transnational Diffusion and the African American Reinvention of Gandhian Repertoire." Mobilization 5(2): 201-216.

      14. Giugni, M. G. (1998). "The Other Side of the Coin: Explaining Crossnational Similarities between Social Movements." Mobilization 3(1): 89-105. The explanations are integrated: globalization, structural affinity, diffusion.

      15. Maney, G. M. (2001). "Transnational Structures and Protest: Linking Theories and Assessing Evidence." Mobilization 6(1): 83-100. Combines world-system, dependency, & international relations theories with political process theory to generate propositions. The available evidence indicates that cyclical phases in the capitalist world economy, economic & political dependency, & competition & conflict among states significantly affect dimensions of political opportunity.

      16. Schock, K. (1999). "People Power and Political Opportunities: Social Movement Mobilization and Outcomes in the Philippines and Burma." Social Problems 46(3): 355-375. Modify political opportunity for nondemocratic contexts. Influential allies & elite divisions influenced the mobilization & outcomes, but also the undertheorized role of the international context & the importance of press freedoms & information flows. Configuration approach is offered.

      17. Smith, J. (2001). "Globalizing Resistance: The Battle of Seattle and the Future of Social Movements." Mobilization 6(1): 1-19.

      18. Bob, C. (2002). “Political Process Theory and Transnational Movements: Dialectics of Protest among Nigeria's Ogoni Minority.” Social Problems 49(3): 395-415.

      19. Ayres, J. M. (2001). “Transnational Political Processes and Contention against the Global Economy.” Mobilization 6(1): 55-68. Reprinted in Smith & Johnston, Globalization & Resistance.

      20. Carmin, J. and B. Hicks (2002). “International Triggering Events, Transnational Networks, and the Development of Czech and Polish Environmental Movements.” Mobilization 7(3): 305-324. State structures (democratic vs. authoritarian) affect how international effects impact movements.



    1. Religion and Social Movements. (Note: There is a separate literature on religious movements which is not represented here.)

      1. Dwight Billings. "Religion as Opposition: A Gramscian Analysis." AJS 96: July 1990 1-31. Comparison of clergy's attitudes and actions in textile towns and coal towns. Anti-union in former, pro-union in latter. Religion as significant in politics of class formation.

      2. Dwight B. Billings and Shaunna L. Scott. "Religion and Political Legitimation." Annual Review of Sociology 20: 173-201. 1994. review of literature relating religion to politics. discussion of links to social movements and culture literatures.

      3. Daniel H. Levine and Scott Mainwaring. "Religion and Popular Protest in Latin America: Contrasting Experiences." In Susan Eckstein, ed. Power and Popular Protest: Latin American Social Movements. 1989. UNC Press. pp 203-240. Catholic church in Brazil and Colombia (progressive vs conservative). base communities created by church actors. have apolitical impact, but are centrally religious. details of how they work in the two countries and end up with different impacts relating to how they are embedded in larger structures.

      4. Mayer N. Zald and John D. McCarthy. "Religious Groups as Crucibles of Social Movements." In Zald and McCarthy, Social Movements in an Organizational Society.

      5. Maren Lockwood Carden. 1989. "The Institutionalization of Social Movements in Voluntary Organizations." Research in Social Movements, Conflicts, and Change 11: 143-161. How and why feminists gained major advances within the five liberal mainline Protestant denominations.

      6. Wood, Richard L. (1994). “Faith in Action: Religious Resources for Political Success in Three Congregations.” Sociology of Religion 55(4): 397-417. Compares political action and liturgy of three congregations.

      7. Barbara Epstein. Political Protest and Cultural Revolution. Chapter 5 “Feminist Spirituality and Magical Politics” and Chapter 6 “The Religious Community: Mass Politics and Moral Witness” provide a detailed comparative discussion of the role of two quite different religious orientations in radical politics.

      8. Lofland, J. and J. T. Richardson (1984). “Religious Movement Organizations: Elemental Forms and Dynamics.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 7: 29-51.

      9. Pattillo McCoy, Mary. 1998. "Church Culture as a Strategy of Action in the Black Community". American Sociological Review; 1998, 63, 6, Dec, 767-784.

      10. Young, M. P. (2002). “Confessional Protest: The Religious Birth of U.S. National Social Movements.” American Sociological Review 67(5): 660-688. Plus critique by Tilly 689-692 and Rejoinder by Young 693-695.

    PART II. CONTENTS OF COLLECTIONS (others are posted on my web page)



    1. Chapters in Goodwin et al, Passionate Politics. (PP)

      1. Allahyari, R. A. (2001). The felt politics of charity: serving "the ambassadors of God" and saving "the sinking classes". PP: 195-211. Importance of experiencing, feeling the politics of caring for the poor as embodied participants in org. cultures. Salvation Army demanded disciplined commitment to rehabilitation & acceptance of state policy. Loaves & Fishes radical Christianity encouraged political activism. Emotions, morality, cognitions wrapped up in self-work. Interplay of emotion and morality in the felt politics of conflicts over serving the poor.

      2. Barker, C. (2001). Fear, laughter, and collective power: the making of solidarity at the Lenin shipyard in Gdnask, Poland, August 1980. PP: 175-194. Vague anger turned into a major strike/ Participants remember sudden shifts in emotions, from fear to pride then derision at officials, solemn silence to fierce shouting, doubt to pleasure, panic to confidence. Emotions are not things but qualities of action or thought; emotions and cognitions are intertwined, emotions are part of the meaning of action or thought or speech, part of dialogical context, intensity of emotion is important, there are rapid qualitative breaks in emotion. Narrative of the strike showing examples.

      3. Berezin, M. (2001). Emotions and political identity: mobilizing affection for the polity. PP: 83-98. Italian fascists employed public rituals to induce strong feeling of national belonging, emotional underside to political identities. Political identities are not natural, have to be constructed. Liberalism represses political emotion. Details of emotional tropes in fascism.

      4. Calhoun, C. (2001). Putting emotions in their place. PP: 45-57. Was obviously originally concluding remarks commenting on themes at the conference. Essay on how people think about emotions, suggesting need to differentiate emotions. Avoid dualism. Among social movements, need to distinguish normal everyday movements from those that arouse emotions. Movements produce emotions, not just reflect them.

      5. Collins, R. (2001). Social movements and the focus of emotional attention. PP: 27-45. An essay on the collective dynamics of emotional energy, the formation of unity and its dissolution.

      6. Dobbin, F. (2001). The business of social movements. PP: 74-80. Both movement activists & scholars of movements increasing see the "passions" motivating behavior turned into "interests" and thus turn passionate behavior into calculative behavior. Tied to rationalization and demystification of social life. Economics model of organizing. People make sense of their own behavior through the interest frame. Mistake to believe what people say about their own motives.

      7. Goodwin, J., J. M. Jasper, et al. (2001). Introduction: Why Emotions Matter. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 1-24. Mostly overview, some brief discussion of types of emotions, social construciton of emtion. Emotions matter in each state of a movement.

      8. *Goodwin, J. and S. Pfaff (2001). Emotion work in high-risk social movements: managing fear in the U.S. and East German civil rights movements. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 282-300. High risk activists need to deal with fears of reprisals against self or family. Networks, gatherings, rituals, identities, shaming, guns all helped people deal with fear. Emotion management and encouragement.

      9. Gould, D. (2001). Rock the boat, don't rock the boat, baby: ambivalence and the emergence of militant AIDS activism. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 135-157. Mixture of pride and shame, so responded to AIDS with volunteerism, quiet nobility. But after court decisions, shifted to indignation: pride = militant confrontation. Traces the shift from politeness to anger. [parallels to 1960s black movement, fits with oppositional consciousness arguments]

      10. Groves, J. M. (2001). Animal rights and the politics of emotion: folk constructions of emotion in the animal rights movement. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 212-230. Men's expression of emotion in animal rights movement were considered legitimate, but women who expressed emotion were considered unprofessional, irrational, feminine. Career-oriented women felt they had to substantiate their feelings with scientific arguments and support of men. Based on interviews with activists, showing how they viewed emotions.

      11. *Kane, A. (2001). Finding emotion in social movement processes: Irish land movement metaphors and narratives. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 251-266. Emotional aspects of movement meanings, solidarity, alliances. Analyze narratives in Irish land movement, finds many emotion metaphors. Metaphors of humiliation and shame, confrontation, resistance. [Fits in with oppositional consciousness ideas.]

      12. *Kemper, T. (2001). A structural approach to social movement emotions. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 58-73. Goal of chapter is to provide movement scholars a brief grounding in the structural approach to emotions--explain why emotions are prevalent or likely to arise as structural conditions change or remain the same. Emotions arise from social relationship outcomes. Power and status are organizing relations for emotions. Detailed predictions. Emotions tied to relative power & status. This seems very useful.

      13. Nepstad, S. E. and C. Smith (2001). The social structure of moral outrage in recruitment to the U.S. Central America peace movement. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 158-174. Social structure of moral shocks. Church members had ties to Central Americans, felt they knew them, thus reacted with activism to US covert insurgency. Argument is that theology + network ties to Central Americans put church members in touch with information about atrocities which led to moral outrage; moral outrage motivated participation.

      14. Polletta, F. and E. Amenta (2001). Conclusion: second that emotion? Lessons from once-novel concepts in social movement research. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 303-316. Fill in political process: not just opportunities, but indignation. In doing research on emotions, need conceptual clarity & comparison. Provoke new questions.

      15. Stein, A. (2001). Revenge of the shamed: the Christian Right's emotional culture war. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 115-132. Christian conservative activists reported selfless commitment to higher authorities, but also feelings of rejection, passivity, powerlessness. Try to construct views of selves as strong and independent, in contrast to weak, shameful others (gays & lesbians). See selves as victims of external forces, but believe in individualist ethos. Individualism helps them deny shame but also exacerbates it. Lead them to resent the world. [My skimming makes this seem like the kind of psychologizing that led to the RM revolution.]]

      16. *Whittier, N. (2001). Emotional strategies: the collective reconstruction and display of oppositional emotions in the movement against child sexual abuse. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 233-250. Activist survivors encourage different emotions in different locales. Among their own, express anger, grief, shame but also pride. When pressing claims, must exhibit grief, fear, shame but not anger or pride. In response to countermovement characterizing them as hysterical, they make efforts to present themselves as cool, rational, objective. Good article.

      17. *Wood, E. J. (2001). The emotional benefits of insurgency in El Salvador. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 267-281. Salvadoran peasants took pleasure and pride in their rebellion, regardless of calculation of success. Collective action for its own sake: to assert agency was to reclaim dignity. Protest itself was the goal. Only later, when repression was lighter, was their pride in achieving interests. [links to oppositional consciousness]

      18. Young, M. P. (2001). A revolution of the soul: transformative experiences and immediate abolition. Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements. J. Goodwin, J. M. Jasper and F. Polletta. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 99-114. Slavery came to be seen as sinful, abolishing it linked to personal redemption. Different emotion cultures create new motivations for and targest of protest. Affective and reactive emotions interact in moral shocks. 1830, sea change in opposition to slavery. Religious revivals of 1820s and 1830s had effect. Western evangelicals central to spread of abolitionism. Different models of piety, shift to "break the chains of sin." [Emotions play a role, but the argument appears to be cognitive.]




    1. Chapters in Mansbridge & Morris, Oppositional Consciousness

      1. *Mansbridge, J. (2001). The making of oppositional consciousness. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 1-19. Overview, the problem of opposing dominant structures, bringing dominance back in, and the problem of resisting when oppressed. Liberation vs other movements. The rest of the chapter summarizes thepoint of the rest of the chapters.

      2. *Morris, A. and N. Braine (2001). Social movements and oppositional consciousness. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 20-37. Argues that liberation movements against domination differ in key ways from social problems movements.

      3. *Mansbridge, J. (2001). Complicating oppositional consciousness. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 238-264. Analysis of oppositional consciousness, 4 components of minimal opp consc (identify, see injustice, demand rectification, see shared interest). Recognition of injustice is central. More mature opp consc includes other elements. A continuum, not dichtomy, with many different relations depending on structural context. Activists more important in opp consc. But opp culture is more diffuse.

      4. Groch, S. (2001). Free spaces: creating oppositional consciousness in the disability rights movement. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 65-98. Disability movement, conscious creation of images, slogans etc drawing on deaf & blind culture in segregated residential schools + civil rights movemetn. Deaf culture stronger because more autonomous spaces. Segregation as part of oppositional consciousness.

      5. Harris, F. C. (2001). Religious resources in an oppositional civic culture. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 38-64. Bible stories & other Black church imagry the basis for oppositional civic culture. Distinguishes oppositional consciousness from oppositional culture.

      6. Marshall, A.-M. (2001). A spectrum in oppositional consciousness: sexual harassment plaintiffs and their lawyers. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 99-145. Many different individual motives, some individuals very politicized, others not. But all borrowed on feminist interpretive frame regardless of own motives.

      7. Rodriguez, M. S. (2001). Cristaleño consciousness: Mexican-American activism between Crystal City, Texas and Wisconsin, 1963-80. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 146-169. Mexican American movement in Crystal City linked two strands, traditional Texas resistance linked with outside progressive labor politics, especially the farmer-labor culture in Wisconsin & Minnesota. Processes of synthesis and historical contingency.

      8. Stockdill, B. C. (2001). Forging a multidimensional oppositional consciousness: lessons from community-based AIDS activism. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 204-237. AIDS activists struggle against dominance by sex, race, class; are both oppresed and oppressor. Multidimensional consciousness, experience of oppression does not easily generalize.

      9. Waite, L. G. (2001). Divided consciousness: the impact of black elite consciousness on the 1966 Chicago Freedom Movement. Oppositional consciousness: the subjective toots of social protest. J. Mansbridge and A. Morris. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 170-203. MLK in Chicago 1966. Blacks for and against him all had oppositional consciousness, but not unity. Had different material & ideological interests. Interests had effects not directly but through interpretive schemas. Concept of internally differentiated oppositional consciousness.




    1. Chapters in Methods of Social Movement Research. Bert Klandermans and Suzanne Staggenborg, editors. 2002. University of Minnesota Press. Social Movements, Protest and Contention, Volume 16. Minneapolis.

      1. Introduction by Klandermans & Staggenborg. Quick overview of theoretical history of SM, then a quick treatment of issues in choosing a research method.

      2. 1. “Survey Research: A Case for Comparative Designs.” Bert Klandermans and Jackie Smith. MSMR 3-31. A good chapter which quickly does standard survey stuff and a quick overview of how surveys have been used in SM research, and gives most of its attention to different logics of comparative designs: between groups, across time, etc.

      3. 2. “Formal Models in Studying Collective Action and Social Movements.” Pamela E. Oliver and Daniel J. Myers. MSMR 32-61. Suggestions about the logic of doing modeling, as well as about how to evaluate models.

      4. 3. “Verification and Proof in Frame and Discourse Analysis.” Hank Johnston. MSMR 62-91. A quick, clear exposition of concepts of frame and discourse, then a clear overview of qualitative and quantitative approaches to studying them.

      5. 4. “Semi-Structured Interviewing in Social Movement Research.” Kathleen M. Blee and Verta Taylor. MSMR 92-117. An overview which argues for value of letting people speak their own words. It addresses some of the practical problems in interviewing and lays out the types of interviews.

      6. 5. “Seeing Structure Happen: Theory-Driven Participant Observation.” Paul Lichterman. MSMR 118-145. Focus is on how you find theory iteratively in a case study: choose a case because it seems different, how the process of concept refinement unfolds.

      7. 6. “The Case Study and the Study of Social Movements.” David A. Snow and Danny Trom. MSMR 146-172. Thoughtful discussion of the logic of case studies, emphasizing multiple methods & perspectives within a case, thick description. Discussion of whether to choose “typical” or “atypical” cases and of whether to choose one or multiple cases.

      8. 7. “Network Analysis.” Mario Diani. MSMR 173-200. How network data can be collected and discussion of different things you can “measure” in a network structure.

      9. 8. “Recovering Past Protest: Historical Research on Social Movements.” Elisabeth S. Clemens and Martin D. Hughes. MSMR 201-230. A quick overview on types of data sources & their limitations, a quick overview of social movement theory & historical data, and a discussion of the types of arguments that can be advanced from historical data.

      10. 9. “Protest Event Analysis.” Ruud Koopmans and Dieter Rucht. MSMR 231-259. Emphasis is on how you construct the data from sources, the importance of definitions and scope of the collection; issues of selectivity in sources. Examples.

      11. 10. “Macro-Organizational Analysis.” Debra C. Minkoff. MSMR 260-285. Emphasis is on getting data on multiple organizations within a movement sector and then analyzing their rise & fall.

      12. 11. “Comparative Politics and Social Movements.” Dontatella della Porta. MSMR 286-313. This is an essay on the logic of comparative politics and the issues involving in making comparisons and deciding what to compare.

      13. “Conclusion: Blending Methods and Building Theories in Social Movement Research.” Bert Klandermans, Suzanne Staggenborg, and Sidney Tarrow. MSMR 314-350. This is a nice essay which first provides an overview of the kinds of research that has been done on SM over time, then points to issues in selecting methods and problems to work on.




    1. Marco Giugni, Doug McAdam, Charles Tilly. How Social Movements Matter. University of Minnesota Press 1999.

      1. Marco Giugni. Intro. "How Social Movements Matter" xiii-xxxiii. A review of past research and inventory of ways movements have effects.

      2. 1. Paul Burstein. "Social Movements and Public Policy" 3-21

      3. 2. Edwin Amenta and Michael Young. Making an Impact; Conceptual and Methodological Implications of the Collective Goods Criterion. 22-41

      4. 3. Hanspeter Kriesi and Dominique Wisler. "The Impact of Social Movements on Political Institutions: A Comparison of the Introduction of Direct Legislation in Switzerland and the United States."42-65

      5. 4. Protest, Protesters, and Protest Policing: Public Discourses in Italy and Germany from the 1960s to the 1980s. Donatella della Porta. 66-96

      6. 5. Political Protest and Institutional Change: The Anti-Vietnam War Movement and American Science. Kelly Moore. 97-118

      7. 6. The Biographical Impact of Activism. Doug McAdam.

      8. 7. Joyce Gelb and Vivien Hart. Feminist Politics in a Hostile Environment: Obstacle and Opportunities. 149-181

      9. 8. How the Cold War was Really Won: The Effects of the Antinuclear Movements of the 1980s. David S. Meyer. 182-203 Argues that the peace movement was a significant factor.

      10. 9. The Impact of Environmental Movements in Western Societies. Dieter Rucht 204-224

      11. 10. Ruud Koopmans nad Paul Statham. Ethnic and Civic Conceptions of Nationhood and the Differential Success of the Extreme Right in Germany and Italy. 225-252

      12. Conclusion. Charles Tilly. From Interactions to Outcomes in Social Movements. 253-270.




    1. Social Movements and Networks - Relational Approaches to Collective Action, Mario Diana and Doug McAdam, eds.

      1. Introduction

      2. 1 Mario Diani: Social movements, contentious actions, and social networks: 'from metaphor to substance'?

      3. 2 Florence Passy: Social Networks Matter. But How?

      4. 3 Helmut Anheier: Movement development and organizational networks: The role of 'single members' in the German Nazi party, 1925-1930

      5. 4 Maryjane Osa: Networks in opposition: Linking organizations through activists in the Polish People's Republic

      6. 5 Mario Diani: 'Leaders' or brokers? Positions and influence in social movement networks

      7. 6 Christopher Ansell: Community embeddedness and collaborative governance in the San Francisco Bay Area environmental movement

      8. 7 Charles Tilly and Lesley J. Wood: Contentious connections in Great Britain, 1828-1834

      9. 8 Pamela Oliver and Daniel Myers: Networks, diffusion, and cycles of collective action

      10. 9 Jeffrey Broadbent: Movement in context: Thick networks and Japanese environmental protest

      11. 10 Roger Gould: Why do networks matter? Rationalist and structuralist interpretations

      12. 11 Ann Mische: Cross-talk in movements: Reconceiving the culture-network link

      13. 12 Doug McAdam: Beyond structural analysis: toward a more dynamic understanding of social movements

      14. 13 Mario Diani: Networks and social movements: A research programme

    The Blackwell Companion to Social Movements. Edited by: David Snow, Sarah Soule and HANSPETER KRIESI (University of Zurich). Series: Blackwell Companions to Sociology


    Part I: Introduction:

    1. Mapping The Terrain: David A. Snow (University Of Arizona), Sarah A. Soule (University Of Arizona), And Hanspeter Kriesi (University Of Zurich)

    Part II: Facilitative Contexts and Conditions:

    2.Protest in Time and Space: The Evolution of Waves of Contention: Ruud Koopmans (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin Für Sozialforschun)

    3. The Strange Career of Strain and Breakdown Theories of Collection Action: Steven M. Buechler (Minnesota State University)

    4. Political Context and Opportunity: Hanspeter Kriesi (Universität Zürich)

    5. The Cultural Contexts of Collective Action: Constraints, Opportunities, and The Symbolic Life Of Social Movements: Rhys H. Williams (University Of Cincinnati)

    6.Resources and Social Movement Mobilization: Bob Edwards (East Carolina University) And John D. Mccarthy (The Pennsylvania State University)

    Part III: Field of Action and Dynamics:

    7. Beyond the Iron Law: Rethinking the Place of Organizations in Social Movement Research: Elisabeth S. Clemens and Debra C. Minkoff (University Of Chicago; University Of Washington)

    8. Leadership in Social Movements: Aldon D. Morris and Suzanne Staggenborg (Northwestern University; Mcgill University)

    9. Movement Allies, Adversaries and Third Parties: Dieter Rucht (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin)

    10. Policing Social Protest: Donatella Della Porta and Olivier Fillieule (European University Institute, Florence; University of Lausanne)

    11. Bystanders, Public Opinion, and the Media: William A. Gamson (Boston College)

    12. "Get Up, Stand Up:" Tactical Repertoires of Social Movements: Verta Taylor and Nella Van Dyke (University of California, Santa Barbara; Washington State University)

    13. Diffusion Processes Within and Across Movements: Sarah A. Soule (University of Arizona)

    14. Transnational Processes and Movements: Jackie Smith (SUNY Stony Brook)

    Part IV: Microstructural and Social Psychological Dimensions:

    15. Networks and Participation: Mario Diani (University of Trento)

    16. The Demand and Supply of Participation: Social-Psychological Correlates of Participation in Social Movements: Bert Klandermans (Free University, Amsterdam)

    17. Framing Processes, Ideology, and Discursive Fields: David A. Snow (University Of California, Irvine)

    18. Emotional Dimensions of Social Movements: Jeff Goodwin, James Jasper and Francesca Polletta (New York University; Independent Scholar; Columbia University)

    19. Collective Identity, Solidarity, and Commitment: Scott A. Hunt and Robert D. Benford (University Of Kentucky; Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)

    Part V: Consequences And Outcomes:

    20. The Legislative, Organizational, and Beneficiary Consequences of State-Oriented Challenges: Edwin Amenta and Neal Caren (both New York University)

    21. Personal and Biographical Consequences: Marco Giugni (University of Geneva)

    22. The Cultural Consequences of Social Movements: Jennifer Earl (University of California, Santa Barbara)

    23. The Consequences of Social Movements for Each Other: Nancy Whittier (Smith College)

    Part VI: Major Social Movements:

    24. The Labor Movement In Motion: Rick Fantasia and Judith Stepan-Norris (Smith College; University Of California, Irvine)

    25. Feminism and the Women's Movement: A Global Perspective: Myra Marx Ferree and Carol Mueller (University of Wisconsin; Arizona State University West)

    26. Environmental Movements: Christopher Rootes (University of Kent)

    27. Antiwar and Peace Movements: Sam Marullo and David S. Meyer (Georgetown University; University Of California, Irvine)

    28. Ethnic and Nationalist Movements: Susan Olzak (Stanford University)

    29. Religious Movements: Fred Kniss and Gene Burns (Loyola University; Michigan State University)

    Index




  • 1   2


    The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
    send message

        Main page