Department: Social Studies Course Purpose: Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, our



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Stage II – Common Assessments
Political Cartoon – “How Were People and Society Affected by the New Imperialism?”

Suggested: Historical Role-play of the Berlin Conference to cooperate on imperial conflicts. . Each student will draft, prepare, and present a speech that takes a position on the problem of the colonization of Africa .in the late 19th century. Students will also submit a written debriefing.







Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences

Venn Diagram: Contrasting China and Japan response to Imperialism


Videos : Magnificent African Cake, Genius that was China, Last Samurai

Teacher powerpoints on African Art, Japanese perceptions of westerners

Primary source documents: “White Man’s Burden” “Yukiichi Fukizawa – On Western Imperialism”
Historical Role-play of the Berlin Conference to cooperate on imperial conflicts. Students will research and debate the issues created by the Scramble for Africa from the points of view of European imperialists and leaders of non-Western countries .




Unit 6: World War I and its aftermath

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 15 days (10 days prior to midterm, 5 days after)




Essential Questions

  1. Why do nations go to war?

  2. How do they make peace?




Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.9 Describe the immediate and long-term causes of World War I


5.10 & 5.12 Understand the immediate and long-term results of World War I, both resolved and unresolved, as well as researching avenues of peaceful conflict resolution such as the Fourteen Points and the Treaty of Versailles and how its failure led to Totalitarianism and World War II
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

11.8 & 11.9 Analyze the historical and social impact of the Industrial Revolution in the creation of total war during World War I on people’s core values, beliefs, and attitudes


TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE

4.1 Consider multiple perspectives and analyze multiple viewpoints on how to make peace and prevent future conflict.


4.3 Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by providing examples of how different choices could have lead to different outcomes in the war and in the peace.
INFORMATION ACCESSING 1.12.3, 1.12.4, 1.12.5 Students will develop a search strategy to access advanced references, indexes, dictionaries and special subject sources.
Students will demonstrate ability to extract and organize relevant information from a variety of source formats.
Students will demonstrate ability to synthesize information to answer a question or support a thesis position.
COMMUNICATION

2.12.1 Students will use word processing software to compose, edit, and revise ideas for clear communication and purposeful writing in papers, essays, and reports.


2.12.4 Students will use video, audio, and multimedia tools to create clear and meaningful presentations of ideas.

Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The major causes of World War I including Militarism, Alliances, Nationalism, Imperialism and Assassination (M.A.N.I.A.)
The key developments in technology, warfare and propaganda that led to modern/total war
The major factors for US entry into the war, the defeat of the Central Powers and victory of Allies

The emerging roles of Russia and the United States as world powers


The challenges of planning and implementing the peace treaties of World War I: collective security, national self-determination, sovereignty, mandates, enforcement of arms agreements

The role of colonials in total war and its impact on emerging nationalism in non-Western countries (India, China, Japan, Israel, Iraq, Saudi Arabia)





The students will be able to:
Analyze the immediate and long-term causes of World War I .
Make connections with other military conflicts to explain why nations go war
Formulate questions regarding key developments in technology, warfare and propaganda that led to modernized war
Demonstrate empathy for people who struggled during the period, including soldiers, non-combatants, pandemic victims
Predict and draw conclusions about the impact of the peace treaties of World War I on Europe as well as in non-Western countries
Research, write, and debate solutions to the conflicts that led to the war and seek workable compromise.




Stage II – Common Assessments
CAPT Reading for Information on a passage from “All Quiet on the Western Front” explaining the nature of total war or similar assignment with primary source document.
Check for understanding: sequence chain on the causes of World War I.
Historical Role Play of the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. The groups will research, write and present speeches that either endorse, reject or revise the actual treaties. They will also submit a written debriefing of the debates.





Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Notes on film clips from the PBS World War I Series.
Analysis of propaganda posters from World War I.
Maps comparing geography of Europe and the Middle East before and after World War I.
Historical Role Play of the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. Working in groups, students will respond to selected articles of the 1919 peace treaties from the points of view of various western and non-western countries involved in the Great War. Students’ proposals must include their country’s interpretation of the causes of the war and a persuasive argument for how to prevent future conflict.




Midterm Exam

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit:




Essential Questions

1. Does Industrialization Lead to Progress?

2. Does Nationalism Lead to Progress?

3. Does Imperialism Lead to Progress?




Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
POLITICAL SYSTEMS

2.10 & 2.11 The ideals of the Enlightenment led people to challenge the legitimacy colonialism. New expectations about liberty and sovereignty led to conflict between nations.


2.13 Explain the historical development of nation-states and the significance of nationalism as a force in the 19th century.
DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CIVILIZATIONS

3.17 Analyze how the diffusion of 18th century revolutionary ideas were adapted in the 19th century by people seeking to create viable nation-states.


COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.9 & 5.11 Analyze examples of the causes and effects of conflict including colonialism, imperialism and world conflict, as it especially relates to Europe and the US’ actions in Asia and Africa


ECONOMIC DECSION-MAKING

10.16 Analyze the principles of trade and the role of economic interdependence in the lives of humans that emerged because of the Industrial Revolution’s impact on the New Imperialism

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

11.9 Analyze the social impact of technological developments on the policies and beliefs of people in western and non-western countries.



Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:


The challenges facing the industrialization of developed and developing countries.
The positive and negative effects of industrialization.
The successes and problems caused by the factory system, how the nature of work changed due to urbanization and imperialism, and the transformation of people’s aspirations for a better standard of living.
The diffusion and adaptation of Enlightenment ideals in the 19th century to national movements of modernization and unification in China, Japan and Africa.


The students will be able to:
Analyze the factors needed for a country to industrialize.
Assess the consequences of industrialization, nationalism and imperialism on Western and non-Western countries.
Explain how industrialization helped spur nationalism and imperialism, and led to both conflicts and cooperation by synthesizing evidence from all previous units.
Make inferences about the implications of industrialization, nationalism and imperialism.
Identify cause and effect using primary source documents.





Stage II – Common Assessments

Reading for Information: Written and Visual Documents

Writing Across the Disciplines: Persuasive Essay





Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences

Read and interpret written and visual documents for accuracy and analysis, and connect them to the Essential Understandings of the first semester units.


Write persuasively about controversies raised by the interactions between modern and traditional cultures using evidence from primary source documents and from students’ knowledge from the course.
Simulate the conditions under which students will be assessed on the CAPT Interdisciplinary exam.




Unit 7: The Rise of Militarism and Totalitarian States, 1920-1940

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 15 days




Essential Questions

1. Why Did Nations Have Dictatorships?

2. How Does Dictatorship Lead to Oppression?

3. What Can Dictatorship Teach Us About Democracy?






Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
POLITICAL SYSTEMS

2.10, 2.12: New and old democracies struggle for legitimacy after World War I. Totalitarian dictatorships triumph in many of these countries at the expense of human rights and representative government.


DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CIVILIZATIONS

3.17: The 1920’s was a period of cultural uncertainty and innovation which led to a conflict between modern and traditional values.


COOPERATION AND CONFLICT 5.9, 5.10: Demagogues exploited unresolved questions lingering after World War I to justify policies of militarism, aggression and fascism.
ECONOMIC DECISION-MAKING

10.16: Governments in democracies and dictatorships intervened in response to national and global economic crises.


TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE

4.18 Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by providing examples of how different choices in leadership could have lead to different outcomes in Germany, Russia, and Italy during the interwar years.




Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The causes and effects of the Russian revolutions, including autocracy, oppression and poverty.
The challenges facing new democracies during the Interwar Years (inexperience with democracy, competing ideologies of fascism and communism, political polarization, global economic interdependence, public apathy).
Cultural and social changes (‘the Lost Generation’, surrealism, the women’s movement, consumerism) lead to a traditionalist backlash against modern values.
The reasons why and methods used by fascist leaders to come to power, and how they differed from past monarchs and tyrants. (radio, film and poster propaganda, scapegoating, censorship, demagoguery, police terror).
Explain how the 1919 peace agreements gave rise to new theories of imperialism (irredentism, lebensraum).
How totalitarian regimes were established in Russia, Italy and Germany, and what life was like in those countries for ordinary people
Analyze how children are targeted for indoctrination by totalitarian dictators

The students will be able to:
Analyze the causes and effects of communist and fascist totalitarian dictatorships.

Express empathy for people experiencing oppression under totalitarian dictatorships and economic hardship during War Communism and Great Depression.


Reason with evidence to explain why nations had dictatorships using historical, political, economic and cultural factors.
Compare and contrast the ideologies and policies of dictatorships in Russia, Italy and Germany.
Consider all factors in developing a thesis statement about why nations had dictatorships during the Interwar Years.
Construct meaning by assessing what the struggles of democracies to survive against dictatorship can teach us about our own democratic privileges and responsibilities.






Stage II – Common Assessments

Diagram & Essay: Why Did Nations Have Dictatorships? (all EU’s for this unit)

Using an advanced organizer, students will explain why nations had dictatorships (political, cultural, historical, economic factors), which will be checked for understanding. They will construct a persuasive, thesis-based essay from their organizer.





Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Essay organizer: Over the course of the unit students will interpret the EU’s from their nightly readings in preparation for the essay.
Analyze examples of propaganda from films and power points and evaluate their effectiveness and significance.
Surrealist art (teacher power points).

Videos clips from: World War I Series clips, “Revolution”, “Bolsheviks”; Ken Burns’, “Jazz”; “Stalin” “Confessions of a Hitler Youth”


Watch the film “State of Mind” to compare the policies and methods of control in contemporary North Korea with the totalitarian regimes of the 1920’s and 1930’s.



Unit 8: World War II and its aftermath

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 30 days




Essential Questions

  1. When is war just?

  2. How is it justified?

  3. Can individuals end oppression?




Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
POLITICAL SYSTEMS

2.12 Understand the role and status of human rights within and among nations, and the development of a body of international law defining war crimes and crimes against humanity.


TIME, CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

4.12, 4.15 Recognize and explain how lingering issues from World War I continued to cause conflict and analyze multiple perspectives on how to resolve conflict.


CONFLICT AND COOPERATION

5.9, 5.10, 5.12 Analyze the roles that aggression, appeasement, isolationism and self-defense played in causing World War II.


Assess the role of the League of Nations and diplomacy in resolving conflict.
INFORMATION ACCESSING 1.12.3, 1.12.4, 1.12.5 Students will develop a search strategy to access advanced references, indexes, dictionaries and special subject sources.
Students will demonstrate ability to extract and organize relevant information from a variety of source formats.
Students will demonstrate ability to synthesize information to answer a question or support a thesis position.
COMMUNICATION

2.12.1 Students will use word processing software to compose, edit, and revise ideas for clear communication and purposeful writing in papers, essays, and reports.



Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The distinction between ‘just war’ theory and justifications for war.
The challenges to international security created by fascist aggression, American isolationism, and European appeasement.
The long term and immediate causes of World War II in Asia (Japanese industrialization, and militarism, emperor worship, the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, the creation of Manchukuo) and global responses to Japanese aggression.
The long term and immediate causes of World War II in Europe and Africa (Italian aggression in Ethiopia, German rearmament and lebensraum, the Sudetenland Crisis and the blitzkrieg on Poland) and global responses to fascist aggression.
The chronology of the conflict between the Axis and the Allied powers, and the coordinated struggle to defeat the Axis.
The methods and principles of the Allied victory over the Axis and an effective peace (unconditional surrender, United Nations, war crimes tribunals).
Efforts of resistance by individuals and groups inside and outside totalitarian dictatorships.
How World War II was a total war.

The students will be able to:
Describe points of view of different political leaders on the peace settlement of 1919.
Evaluate the Allied responses to Axis aggression prior to and during World War II, and develop a thesis explaining why WWII began in Asia and why it began in Europe.
Identify the key turning points in the Allied defeat of the Axis.
Using a timeline, explain how the Nazis carried out the Holocaust.
Identify war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during World War II.
Display empathy for the victims of genocide and war crimes.
Judge war criminals on the basis of the Hague and Geneva conventions.
Evaluate just war theory on the basis of the causes and resolution of World War II.
Compare and contrast the outcomes of the two world wars.



Stage II – Common Assessments
Historical mock trial: Debriefing of the Nuremburg War Crimes Tribunal. Students will examine the role of the Nazis in World War II in order to answer the question, “when is war just? how is it justified? and can individuals end oppression? (Information Literacy and Technology Standards 1.12.4, I.12.5, 2.12.1)
Suggested:

Check for Understanding: Cause and effect chart of the events leading to World War II in Asia and in Europe


The League of Nations Debates the Munich Accords. Students will simulate an international response to the 1938 Crisis in the Sudetenland from the points of view of different countries in order to understand the causes of World War II. The debate will evaluate the effectiveness of collective security in responding to aggression as well as the arguments used to justify war.
Mini-debate: Was Using the Atom Bomb Justified?





Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Historical mock trial: Nuremburg War Crimes Tribunal. Using the Hague and Geneva Conventions on war crimes and crimes against humanity and witness testimony, the class will evaluate the role of the Nazi leaders in causing World War II and the Holocaust. The issues of individual and collective responsibility will be explored.
Think-Pair-Share: Why war in Asia? Why war in Europe?
Primary Source Documents:

The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Mein Kampf, The Hague and Geneva Conventions


Films:

Hirohito, Lost Peace, Saving Private Ryan, Schindler’s List, Genocide, Paperclips, or Holocaust Diaries MTV documentary



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