Department: Social Studies Course Purpose: Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, our



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Farmington Public Schools

Curriculum Map

Course: World History II

Department: Social Studies




Course Purpose:

“Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, our

nation, and this means we must develop a world perspective”


  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

World History II is a one year course required for all tenth graders. It is the continuation of the ninth grade World History I requirement.


We believe that a thorough, two year program in world history helps fulfill our school’s academic, civic and social mission. It prepares young people for citizenship in an increasingly pluralistic society and interdependent world. By examining the lives of leaders and ordinary people from the past 250 years, they will learn to reflect, think critically, and reason with evidence. Understanding where the world has been and what it has become will help students see how they are part of the global community and face the challenges of the 21st century.





Major Learning Goals and Understandings:

Progress, conflict resolution and resisting oppression are the major concepts developed throughout the year. Because our major themes emphasize the growth of human rights, economic development, modernization, and globalization our Essential Understandings are:

  • Conflict and Cooperation

  • Political Systems

  • Time, Continuity and Change

  • Science, Technology and Society

  • Economic Decision Making

  • Global and Community Interdependence

Students will learn how to write and speak persuasively and reason with evidence through short essays, debates, and historical role plays. Students are also prepared for the state CAPT Interdisciplinary exams.


Units:

Unit 1: The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment

Unit 2: The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era

Unit 3: Industrial Revolution

Unit 4: Nationalism and the rise of Nation-States

Unit 5: The New Imperialism

Unit 6: World War I and its aftermath

Unit 7: The rise of Militarism and Totalitarianism States

Unit 8: World War II and its aftermath

Unit 9: Globalization since 1945


Authors: Louise Campbell and Lance Goldberg

Revision: Louise Campbell and Michael McElwee

Date: June 28, 2007


Unit 1: The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 15 days




Essential Questions

1. How do new ideas challenge old ways of thinking?

2. Did these new ideas lead to progress?





Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
TIME, CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

4.15 The Renaissance and Reformation introduced and diffused the ideas of progress, humanism, and individualism. Between the 16th and 18th centuries, these ideas increasingly challenged the status quo.


SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

11.8, 11.9 Scientific thinking and innovations transformed Western beliefs and values


POLITICAL SYSTEMS

2.10 The ideas of the Enlightenment challenged the legitimacy of monarchy, theocracy and feudalism. New expectations about liberty, representative government, separation of church and state and human rights led to conflict with existing authorities.





Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The ideas of the Renaissance and Reformation continued to transform politics, culture and society.
New ideas of individualism, meritocracy and secularism challenged the status quo (“the ancient regime”)
The Scientific Revolution made reason, evidence and the Scientific Method the basis of understanding in Western Civilization
New ideas in science led philosophers to propose alternative theories about government and individual rights
The Enlightenment diffused new ideas about the Scientific Method, natural law, natural rights, checks and balances, freedom of expression and government by the consent of the governed.


The students will be able to:
Interpret different points of view about state power versus individual liberties.
Analyze the long term effects of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment on the ideals of reason and progress.
Debate the pros and cons of democracy, the death penalty, and women rights




Stage II – Common Assessments

Reading for Information: Enlightenment Philosopher (to be decided by the team) using unit EU’s and thinking skills


Suggested: Debates on Women’s Equality, Death Penalty, Democracy vs. Enlightened Despotism




Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Introduce CAPT strategy of “Reading for Information”.

Introduce core thinking skills of Point of View, Cause & Effect and Reasoning with Evidence






Unit 2: The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 13 days




Essential Questions

  1. How did the Enlightenment lead to the French Revolution?

  2. Did the French Revolution achieve its goals?




Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION

3.18 The success of the American Revolution inspired the French to overthrow their monarch and establish a government based on Enlightenment ideals. The French Revolution became a model for countries around the world attempting to resist oppression in the 19th and 20th centuries.


POLITICAL SYSTEMS

2.11 The ideals of the Enlightenment were used to justify and legitimatize different forms of government that emerged during the French Revolution.


COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.10 Understand the immediate and long term results of conflict created by revolution and war, both resolved and unresolved.




Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The impact of Enlightenment ideals on the French Revolution (expectations of a higher standard of living and social mobility, representative government, fiscal responsibility, religious tolerance)

How the French experimented with different forms of government (constitutional monarchy, republic, dictatorship.


Different factions that emerged after the Revolution led to instability, the Terror and war.
Identify the successes and failures of the Napoleonic Era (coup d’etat, Napoleonic Code, meritocracy, nationalism, conscription, hegemony, nepotism, despotism).



The students will be able to:
Identify points of view using a political spectrum (radical, liberal, moderate, conservative, reactionary).
Analyze the impact of Enlightenment ideals on important documents of the French Revolution

Evaluate the successes, failures and unresolved conflicts created by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era







Stage II – Common Assessments
Practice CAPT Essay, Writing Across the Disciplines: “Did the Revolution Achieve its Goals?”
Suggested: Debate on Napoleon: “Enlightened Despot or Tyrant?”





Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Create a graphic organizer in preparation for the CAPT essay question, “Did the Revolution Achieve its Goals?
Students will first identify the conditions in France that led to revolution. Then, they will generate a list of goals from the ideals of the Enlightenment. Finally, they will evaluate the extent to which the decisions of the revolutionaries addressed these conditions and goals.
Create a timeline in notebooks 1789-1815
Analyze primary sources: “The Declaration of Independence” , “What is the 3rd Estate?”, “Declaration of the Rights of Man” , “Declaration of the Rights of Woman”, “Robespierre’s speech on regicide”
Analyze art as a form of propaganda: portraits of Napoleon, Goya’s “Third of May”





Unit 3: Age of Nationalism and Rise of Nation-States

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 15 days




Essential Questions

1. Where does nationalism come from?

2. Does nationalism lead to progress?





Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
POLIITCAL SYSTEMS

2.13 explain the historical development of nation states and the significance of nationalism as a force in history.


DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION

3.17 explain and analyze examples of cultural diffusion and adaptation, and the spread of ideas and beliefs.


Analyze how the Enlightenment and French Revolution inspired people around the world to create nation-states in the 19th century.
COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.9 analyze examples of the causes and effects of conflict including colonialism, imperialism, and world conflict.


Examine how the backlash against imperialism led to nationalism in many countries.
INFORMATION ACCESSING 1.12.3, 1.12.4, 1.12.5 Students will develop a search strategy to access advanced references, indexes, dictionaries and special subject sources.
Students will demonstrate ability to extract and organize relevant information from a variety of source formats.
Students will demonstrate ability to synthesize information to answer a question or support a thesis position.
COMMUNICATION

2.12.1 Students will use word processing software to compose, edit, and revise ideas for clear communication and purposeful writing in papers, essays, and reports.


2.12.4 Students will use video, audio, and multimedia tools to create clear and meaningful presentations of ideas.

Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The role of culture, politics and history in the development of national identity (anthems, protest music, art, flags, commemorative holidays).
The positive and negative effects of nationalism (progress versus oppression).
The diffusion and adaptation of Enlightenment ideals in the 19th century to national movements of liberation and unification. (sovereignty, right to rebel, natural rights, modernization)
The global legacies of Napoleon on the spread of nationalism (national self-determination, anti-colonialism) and the limits of imperialism (Congress of Vienna, collective security, hegemony, balance of power).
Identify different ways nations-states achieve independence (charismatic leaders, Realpolitick, alliances, revolution, guerilla warfare)


The students will be able to:
Compare and contrast the class structures of pre-revolutionary France and Latin America.

Using the strategy of Concept Attainment, write a definition of nationalism.


Make inferences about national identity using art and other cultural artifacts.
Display empathy for people who resisted imperial oppression using art and primary sources.
Formulate questions about national identity using speeches, maps and primary source documents.
Analyze maps of South and Central America and German to explain obstacles to national unification.
Using case studies of 19th century and contemporary Germany and Brazil, discuss the EQ, “Did Nationalism Lead to Progress?”






Stage II – Common Assessments
Reading for Information Practice CAPT: primary source document on Latin American nationalism.
Library research project: Where Does Nationalism Come From? Does it Lead to Progress?

Students will identify, research and analyze the roots of nationalism of a country of their choosing. They will also explain with evidence if nationalism led to progress in that country. The product can be a poster, power point, or performance, accompanied by a written analysis. (information literacy and technology standard 1.12.3, 1.12.4, 2.12.4)


Note: This project may be researched at the teacher’s discretion any time before the midterm.
Suggested: Historical Role-play of the Congress of Vienna. Each student will draft, prepare, and present a speech that takes a position on restoring peace after the Napoleonic wars. Students will also submit a written debriefing.




Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Analyze the pros and cons of nationalism using a T-chart.
Analyze primary sources to explain and evaluate the origins and impact of nationalism (Simon Bolivar, Otto von Bismarck)
Analyze western and non-Western art and music as a primary source document to infer the cultural role of nationalism (Goya, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Beethoven, Chopin, Caspar David Friedrich, Delacroix)
Analyze maps of the Italian and German States, South America, Latin America and the Caribbean.
Suggested: Historical Role-play of the Congress of Vienna. Students will role play the point of view of different European leaders who attempted to restore the balance of power in Europe after the Napoleonic wars.




Unit 4: The Industrial Revolution

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 15




Essential Questions

1. How are people and society affected by industrialization?

2. Does industrialization lead to progress?





Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.10 Explain how industrialization created new conflicts between classes and how these conflicts were resolved through reform, revolution, and social legislation.


ECONOMIC DECSION-MAKING

10.13 Explore the responses to industrialization in the new philosophies that emerged including Luddites, unions, utilitarianism, laissez-faire capitalism, socialism and communism.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

11. 8, 11.9 Analyze the social impact of technological developments on people’s core values, beliefs and attitudes during the 19th century.





Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
The causes for the Industrial Revolution to begin in Great Britain

The ideals and realities of capitalism, socialism and communism


The key developments in machinery, transportation, communication, agriculture, entrepreneurship and urbanization that occurred
The success and problems caused by the factory system, how the nature of work changed and the workers desire for a standard of living
The key reform movements of the time
The positive and negative effects of industrialization
The challenges facing the industrialization of emerging nations as well as the challenges facing the entire world with continued industrialization



The students will be able to:
Explain the causes and effects of industrialization on society, economics, politics, and the environment
Identify the significance and consequences regarding developments in machinery, communication, agriculture, entrepreneurship and urbanization
Discuss why people choose or reject capitalism, socialism and communism.
Demonstrate empathy for people who struggled during the labor period, especially labor and children
Analyze the goals and achievements of reform movements

Assess the impact of industrialization

Predict and draw conclusions about the impact of industrialization on different countries.





Stage II – Common Assessments
Historical Role Play: Parliament Debates The Factory Act. Each student will draft, prepare, and present a speech that takes a position on the problem of child labor. Students will also submit a written debriefing.
Reading for Information: Written and visual documents on industrialization




Stage III– Core/Assured Learning Experiences
Historical Role Play: Students will research and debate the 1832 Factory Act from the points of view of Utilitarians, Socialist Utopians, Communists and Laissez-faire capitalists in order to understand conflict and compromise on the issue of child labor.

Review the CAPT strategy, “Real Reading” using written and visual primary source documents on industrialization.


Create a political spectrum based on the new ideologies that emerged in Europe as a result of industrialization.

Identify arguments for and against the different 19th century ideologies.


Analyze Romantic and Impressionist painting, photographs, cartoons and poems created in response to industrialization.
Check for understanding: Note-taking on the causes of industrialization from video, “The Industrial Revolution”
Check for understanding: Venn Diagram on the Pros/Cons/ and Unresolved Issues created by Industrialization





Unit 5: The New Imperialism:

Grade: 10

Subject: Social Studies

Course: World History II

Length of Unit: 13 days




Essential Questions

  1. How were countries affected by the New Imperialism?

  2. Did the New Imperialism lead to progress?




Stage I - Standards

Primary EU’s and Content Standards
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, & SOCIETY

11. 9 Describe the impact of modern technology on traditional societies.


COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

5.9 & 5.11 Analyze examples of the causes and effects of conflict including colonialism, imperialism and world conflict, as it especially relates to Europe and the US’ actions in Asia and Africa


ECONOMIC DECSION-MAKING

10.14 Explain how the Industrial Revolution created a gap between industrialized and non-industrialized countries during the age of the New Imperialism.



Key Content Knowledge and Concepts/Skills

The students will know:
How industrialization and national unification led to the New Imperialism
The roles played by capitalism, trade, humanitarianism, Social Darwinism, religion, militarism and curiosity on the New Imperialism
New sources of global conflict created by European, US and Japanese imperialism in Africa and Asia

Different types of imperial control including direct and indirect rule, colonies, protectorates and spheres of influence. (suggested for honors)


The significance of Japan’s adoption and adaptation of Western ideas in its modernization and rise as an imperial power.


The students will be able to:
Compare and contrast imperialism before the Industrial Revolution with the New Imperialism.
Identify the causes and consequences of the New Imperialism
Assess the impact of the New Imperialism on non-Western countries.
Compare and contrast Chinese and Japanese responses to the New Imperialism.
Demonstrate empathy for people who struggled against the oppression created by the New Imperialism (ex: Boxer Rebellion, Ethiopia, Sepoy Rebellion, Meiji Restoration).
Predict and draw conclusions about the impact of global economic interdependence today.
Identify different responses to conflicts created by the New Imperialism (ex: Berlin Conference, Opium War, Boer War, Russo-Japanese War)

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