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British Literature, 2nd ed. Lesson Plan Overview © BJU Press

British Literature, 2nd Edition

Lesson Plan Overview



Day(s)

Topic

Pages

Support Materials

Bible Integration

Part 1: The Middle Ages

Unit 1: The Old English Period

1

Introduction to Course

Part 1 Opener



iii

2–5





Introduction: Approaching the culture from a Christian worldview

2

Unit 1 Opener

6–13

Appendix 1-A

Appendix 1-B

Appendix 1-C


Opener: The proper Christian attitude toward the Middle Ages; proper understanding of Middle Ages as containing roots of Protestant Reformation

3

Bede

14–16

Writing Rubric 1-1: Imaginative Comparison

Application: Biblical solutions to three basic philosophical questions

Thought and Discussion: Christianity on man’s origins and destiny (Gen. 1; 1 Cor. 15:22) as well as the transience of life (James 4:14)



4

Beowulf

17–23




Discussion: Superiority of Christian to pagan belief; use of fiction to inculcate moral and spiritual truth as in 2 Samuel 12: 1–7

5

Beowulf

23–30




Application: Two errors—false heroes and no heroes; relevance of Anglo-Saxon heroic ideal to spiritual warfare today

Highlights: Beowulf’s words to Hrothgar compared to David’s words to Saul (1 Sam. 17)



6

Beowulf

30–36




Highlights: Comparing the composing of lays in Beowulf to 1 Samuel 18:6, 7 and 2 Samuel 22

7

Riddles

36–37




Introduction: Samson’s riddle (Judg. 14:12–14)

Application: Knowledge of Scripture versus understanding of Scripture

Thought and Discussion: Christian viewpoint on suffering (Acts 5:41)


8

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

38–41

Writing Rubric 1-2: Essay




9

Unit 1 Review










10

Unit 1 Test










Unit 2: The Middle English Period

11

Unit 2 Opener

44–52

Appendix 2-A

Appendix 2-B



Opener: Wycliffe’s spiritual remedy for society’s ills

Introduction: Practice of the two Great Commandments by Chaucer’s plowman (Matt. 22:35–40)



12

John Wycliffe

53–56




Analysis: Determining the significance of spiritual movements by the importance given to Scriptures rather than social reform

Application: Being equipped for spiritual controversy



13

Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer and Prologue

57–62

Writing Rubric 2-1: Character Sketch




14

Geoffrey Chaucer’s Traditional Pilgrims

62–68







15

Geoffrey Chaucer’s Nontraditional Pilgrims

68–81







16

Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale”

81–91




Application: Pilgrimage of life as a biblical concept (Heb. 11:13–16); similarities between Chaucer’s pilgrims and today’s “pilgrims”

Thought and Discussion: Parallels between “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale” and man’s fall and redemption; color symbolism in “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale” and the Bible (Isa. 1:18)



17

Thomas Malory

92–99




Application: The validity of Malory’s concept of true gentility from a Christian perspective

18–19

Ballads

100–109




Analysis: No biblical justification for vengeance or vigilantism

20

Unit 2 Review










21

Unit 2 Test










Part 2: The Renaissance

Unit 3: The Tudor Period

22

Part 2 Opener

Unit 3 Opener



112–27

Appendix 3-A

Appendix 3-B

Appendix 3-C


Introduction: Biblically assessing the Renaissance framework of belief and values

Analysis: Elizabethan England and the national blessedness (Ps. 144:15)



23–24

Sir Thomas More

127–31




Introduction: Luke 18:25 and Sir Thomas More

Application: James 2:15–26 and More’s response to Tyndale’s teachings



25–26

William Tyndale

132–38




Analysis: Tyndale’s themes of the supreme authority of Scripture, justification by faith, and the right of the individual to read and interpret the Scriptures

Application: Character and learning put to effective use for God



27

The Book of Common Prayer

139–42




Application: Biblical perspective on marriage

28–30

John Foxe

143–57




Introduction: Enormous debt believers owe to Foxe’s work

Application: Responding to government biblically; subtle attacks on believers

Highlights: Parallel between Cranmer’s final chance and Samson’s in Judges 16:23–30


31

The Beatitudes

158–61







32

Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey

162–67







33–34

Sir Philip Sidney

167–73




Analysis: Relating “Leave Me, O Love” with Colossians 3:2 and 1 John 2:15

Analysis: Examples of biblical fables

Application: Biblical characters exemplifying Renaissance virtues


35

Sir Walter Raleigh

173–77

Writing Rubric 3-1: Poem

Analysis: Physical adversity often bringing spiritual prosperity

Analysis: Biblical background in “The Pilgrimage” (Deut. 8:7–10; Isa. 12:2–3; etc.); biblical salvation; poetry’s value as a vehicle for spiritual truth

Analysis: God as more than a spectator in human life

Application: Developing readers’ discernment as one function of literature



36–38

Edmund Spenser

178–92




Introduction: Biblically evaluating Spenser’s worldview and the purpose of The Faerie Queene

Analysis: Divine love the model of human love in Sonnet 68 (Eph. 5:25-33; 1 John 3:16; etc.); valuable biblical truths in The Faerie Queene

Application: Arming against Satan’s temptations


39

Unit 3 Review










40

Unit 3A Test (except Shakespeare)










41–45

Midterm Review and Midterm Examination

46

Introduction to William Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s Sonnets



193–98

Writing Rubric 3-2: Sonnet

Introduction: Biblically evaluating Shakespeare’s major themes and worldview

Analysis: Christians as moral idealists rather than cynics

Analysis: The wisdom of making the body the servant of the soul; life in light of earthly transience; the fear of death (1 Cor. 15:56)

Application: Applying the scriptural themes found in the sonnets



47

Introduction to Macbeth

Macbeth Act l, Scenes i–iv

199–211




Overview: The worthless rewards of sin (Mark 8:36–37); the play’s effectiveness due to its biblical background; the consequences of defying authority and of ingratitude (Rom. 1:21)

Potential Problems: Portraying evil in a biblical way (1 Sam. 28:7–25)

Analysis: Biblical view of the theme of the causes and consequences of sin (2 Cor. 10:5, Prov. 23:7); Lady Macbeth as Eve; Macbeth as Judas (John 13:27)

Highlights: Scriptural pattern of usurpation and restoration seen in the plot; evil limited by God (Job 2:6); interpreting Macbeth in light of Deuteronomy 13:1–5



48

Macbeth Act l, Scenes v–vii

211–18




Highlights: Lady Macbeth and Jezebel (1 Kings 21: 5–7, 25)

49

Macbeth Act ll, Scenes i–iv

218–30




Thought and Discussion: Christ’s forgiveness required to wash away guilt

50

Macbeth Act lll, Scenes i–iii

231–38




Highlights: Macbeth, and later Lady Macbeth, describing the futility of sin

51

Macbeth Act lll, Scenes iv–vi

238–47




Thought and Discussion: Macbeth’s seared conscience blinding him to the possibility of repentance

52

Macbeth Act lV, Scenes i–iii

247–63







53

Macbeth Act V, Scenes i–iv

263–70

Writing Rubric 3-3: Article




54

Macbeth Act V, Scenes v–ix

271–77







55–58

Macbeth Scene Enactment or DVD










59

Shakespeare Review










60

Unit 3B Test










Unit 4: The Stuart Period

61–62

Unit 4 Opener

278–87

Appendix 4-A

Appendix 4-B



Overview: Suffering as a means to great spiritual and literary achievement

Analysis: The Restoration theater’s abandoning the Christian heroic worldview



63

Sir Francis Bacon

288–92

Writing Rubric 4-1: Essay

Introduction: Moral wisdom not a guarantee against moral failure

Highlights: Self-recognition preceding repentance in salvation (Luke 15:17)

Thought and Discussion: The proper use of power


64–66

John Donne

292–300

Appendix 4-D

Potential Problems: Objectionable elements in Donne’s poetry

Introduction: The clear effects of Donne’s conversion on his poetry

Analysis: “A Lecture upon the Shadow” alluding to Joshua 10; “Holy Sonnet 7” alluding to Revelation 7; “A Hymn to God the Father” and 1 Cor. 15:56

Analysis: God’s union of justice and mercy (Ps. 63:7)

Application: Donne’s sermon techniques and sermons today


67–68

Ben Jonson

301–4




Introduction: Biblically evaluating Jonson’s worldview

Analysis: Biblically assessing the consolation given in “On My First Son”



69–71

George Herbert

304–10




Introduction: The compatibility of high artistry and spiritual fervor

Analysis: “Redemption” as an allegory based on Scripture (Matt. 2:1–11; 13:44; 18:23–27)

Analysis: Herbert’s themes of God’s loving appeal to man, spiritual preparation to serve, restoration of fellowship, and a Christian application of carpe diem

Application: Applying the sequence of poems to one’s Christian walk



72–73

Samuel Rutherford and Richard Baxter

311–17




Analysis: Explaining the role of suffering in the believer’s life

Application: Writing salvation letters



74

Introduction to John Milton

317–19




Introduction: Milton’s life as an example of God’s gradual leading

Analysis: Christianizing the epic tradition



75

John Milton’s Sonnets

320–21

Appendix 4-E

Analysis: Finding God’s plan for one’s life in His time

Analysis: “Sonnet 18” and biblical allusions to the Babylon of Revelation 17–18; “Sonnet 19” and a Christian’s response to disappointments in life



76–78

John Milton’s Paradise Lost

322–39

Writing Rubric 4-2: Bible Narrative

Analysis: Individual responsibility for one’s sin; the mercy and justice of God

Analysis (Book I): The fictional cosmology of Paradise Lost; evaluating Milton’s portrayal of Satan and of God (Ps. 2:4; 2 Cor. 5:21); Christians’ sure victory through God’s power (James 4:7)

Analysis (Book IX): Separation from God resulting in separation from man

Application: Contemporary misrepresentations of God as the enemy of human happiness

Highlights: The struggle between good and evil as basic to a Christian worldview; reconciling God’s greatness and His goodness


79

Samuel Pepys

340–43




Biography: Biblically assessing Pepys’s life; the emptiness of the world’s successes and pleasures

Application: Pepys’s writing revealing the conflict in human nature between conscience and will (Heb. 10:19–25; Heb. 12; etc.)



80

Introduction to John Bunyan

344–45




Introduction: The spiritual value of fiction and writing in general; the possibility of literature of high artistic and spiritual value

Analysis: A Christian’s writing growing out of suffering



81–83

John Bunyan

345–63




Analysis: The allegorical meaning of Pilgrim’s Progress explained; the nature of salvation; Bunyan’s honesty in portraying the difficulties of the Christian life

Application: The plan of salvation in light of Bunyan’s portrayal



84

Unit 4 Review




Appendix 4-F




85

Unit 4 Test










86–90

Final Review and Final Examination

Part 3: The Age of Revolution

Unit 5: The Neoclassical Period

91

Part 3 Opener

Unit 5 Opener



364–77

Appendix 5-A

Appendix 5-B

Appendix 5-C

Appendix 5-D



Overview: Britain’s drift from Protestantism because of an intellectual and spiritual revolution

Potential Problems: The value of studying the literature of a nation in spiritual decline

Introduction: Neoclassical rejection of Christian values and beliefs


92

John Dryden

377–83

Writing Rubric 6-1: Poem

Analysis: Dryden and a new faith in intellect and reason

Thought and Discussion: Appropriateness of satire for a Christian’s use (1 Kings 18:27)



93–94

Daniel Defoe

383–94

Appendix 5-E

Analysis: The theme of man’s dependency upon his own wisdom and effort and upon God

Application: A biblical view of nature (Gen. 1:28–30; Rom. 1:23, 25)

Thought and Discussion: Emphasis on trusting in God’s providence; regret of ungrateful and complaining spirit


95

Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

394–403




Application: Comparison of Addison’s ode with part of Psalm 19

96–97

Jonathan Swift

404–18




Highlights: Echoes of 2 Kings 6:24–31 in A Modest Proposal

Application: Comparison of Swift’s satire in Gulliver’s Travels to the message of the gospel



98–99

Alexander Pope

419–25




Analysis: Comparing Milton’s and Pope’s attempts to “vindicate the ways of God to men”

Application: Effect of moral qualities on writing style; examples of parallelism in Psalms and other Old Testament books

Thought and Discussion: Flaws in Pope’s philosophy

Highlights: Representing vice in literature; parallel between 1 Corinthians 8:2 and An Essay on Criticism



100

Isaac Watts

425–31




Introduction: Watts’s spiritual legacy

Analysis: Qualities essential to a good hymn; effect of true religion on happiness; strength from God available on the journey to heaven; escaping the Day of Judgment through Christ



101

James Thomson

432–36




Analysis: The might and wisdom of God displayed in Winter

Application: Response to a natural disaster

Thought and Discussion: Allusion to Christ’s stilling of the waters in Mark 4:39


102

John and Charles Wesley

437–53

Appendix 5-F

Introduction: The value of a broad liberal-arts education in the service of Christ; the possibility of making a difference for God in a spiritually dark culture

Analysis: Theme of the power of God; Wesley as an example for Christians

Analysis: Kinds of hymns; the Wesleys’ contributions to hymnody; assurance of salvation found in Scripture

Highlights: Modeling discernment in critiquing secular writers and theater

Application: Scriptural lessons drawn from Wesley’s Journal

Thought and Discussion: Visible changes in community resulting from revival; Wesley as example in midst of trials



103–4

Samuel Johnson

454–62

Appendix 5-G

Introduction: Johnson’s neoclassicism and Christianity, and their effect on his works

Analysis: The value of discipline in the Christian life; a Christian view of and purpose for literature

Highlights: Victory over the fear of death (Heb. 2:14–15)

Application: Biblically critiquing one’s favorite fiction and entertainment to discover lessons taught



105

James Boswell

462–72




Analysis: The moral purpose and careful artistry in The Life of Samuel Johnson

Application: Biblical passages employing physical details to imply emotion or to reveal character



106

Thomas Gray

473–79




Application: A Christian’s view of and practices concerning death

107

Oliver Goldsmith

480–89

Writing Rubric 5-1: Paragraph




108

William Cowper

490–96




Introduction: Cowper’s poetry as a reflection of his efforts to serve God and resist depression

Analysis: Spiritual hope and stability despite depression; biblical allusions in Cowper’s hymns; biblical passages echoed in “The Castaway” (Luke 9:25; Rom. 11:1–2; etc.)

Highlights: Demonstrating sacrificial love to Christian brothers (Rom. 15:1)

Application: Using hymns to encourage others

Thought and Discussion: Obstacles to a closer walk with God; God’s sovereign will accomplished; solution for an overwhelming sense of despair


109–10

Robert Burns

496–503




Introduction: Burns as a religious, moral, and social rebel

111

Unit 5 Review




Appendix 5-H




112

Unit 5 Test










Unit 6: The Romantic Period

113

Unit 6 Opener

504–15

Appendix 6-A

Appendix 6-B

Appendix 6-C


Overview: Contrasting neoclassicism and romanticism and assessing their effect on Christianity

Highlights: The effects of philosophical idealism on Christianity; the shift in meaning of create to reflect romantic thinking; romantic primitivism and a reversion to paganism; the biblical reply to uniformitarianism (2 Peter 3:4–9)



114–15

William Blake

516–22




Potential Problems: Blake as a negative example of Christian beliefs and values

Overview: Blake’s pernicious moral viewpoint and the sources from which it is drawn

Analysis: Blake’s rejection of traditional social institutions and of the Christian theology underlying many of them; a biblical view of love (Matt. 5:3–12; 6:19–21)

Application: Biblically evaluating Blake’s philosophy and influence, particularly his dualism



116–18

William Wordsworth

523–32

Appendix 6-D

Writing Rubric 6-1: Poem



Introduction: Wordsworth’s poems as vehicles of a new, subversive philosophical and religious viewpoint

Analysis: Nature and moral education; comparing Wordsworth’s consolation for death to the scriptural view

Application: Pitfalls of Wordsworth’s philosophy

Thought and Discussion: Fallacy of the happy pagan



119–20

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

532–53




Analysis: Fusion of transcendental journey and Christian allegory in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Application: Contrasting Coleridge’s wedding guest and the unwilling wedding guests of Luke 14:16–24; unity-of-life theme in light of Scripture (Prov. 12:10; Matt. 10:29–31)



121

Charles Lamb

554–60

Writing Rubric 6-2: Familiar Essay

Application: Comparing Elia’s and Bridget’s viewpoints with biblical values

122–23

George Gordon, Lord Byron

560–65




Introduction: Inoculating against Byron’s melancholy hero-rebel

Analysis: Byron’s lifestyle rooted in spiritual rebellion; the biblical remedy for Byronic despair (Eze. 33:10–11)

Application: A sense of defeat and wounded pride corrected by consecration to duty; the attractiveness of moral purity


124–25

Percy Bysshe Shelley

565–73

Appendix 6-E

Appendix 6-F



Application: Applying the book of Proverbs to Shelley; biblical prediction of a short life and an untimely death for the rebel (Exod. 20:12; Prov. 29:1)

126–28

John Keats

573–89

Appendix 6-G

Potential Problems: The purity of Porphyro’s intentions toward Madeline

Introduction: Biblically evaluating Keats’s worldview

Application: The literary pleasure as well as the spiritual instruction and correction in the Word of God

Highlights: Christians’ belief in God’s orchestration of events in their lives



129

Unit 6 Review




Appendix 6-H




130

Unit 6 Test










131–35

Midterm Review and Midterm Examination

Part 4: The Age of Reform

Unit 7: The Victorian Period

136–37

Part 4 Opener

Unit 7 Opener



590–604

Appendix 7-A

Appendix 7-B

Appendix 7-C


Overview: The “social gospel” as a substitute for the real gospel; encouragement of spiritual complacency by physical prosperity

Analysis: The seeking of new foundation for morality; errors of Darwinism and Marxism



138

Thomas Carlyle

604–8




Introduction: Carlyle as transcendentalist mystic, offering an alternative to Christianity and rationalism

Analysis: Evaluating Carlyle’s attitude toward Christianity

Application: Carlyle’s acquaintance with and rejection of Christian truth

Highlights: Comparing Carlyle’s philosophy of truth with Matthew 9:16; divine vocation and providence (Ezek. 22:30); allusion to 1 Kings 18, Leviticus 9:24, etc.



139

John Henry Newman

609–12




Introduction: Evaluating Newman’s worldview

Analysis: Newman’s belief in religious principles as guide

Application: Comparing Newman’s and Carlyle’s spiritual beliefs to Scripture


140–42

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

613–36

Appendix 7-D

Writing Rubric 7-1: Monologue Poem



Introduction: Evaluating Tennyson’s religious conservatism

Analysis: Biblically evaluating Tennyson’s treatment of the themes of progress, religious doubt, and death; discerning between his transcendentalism and Christianity

Application: Discussing the weakness of In Memoriam from T. S. Eliot’s assessment


143

Robert Browning

637–41

Appendix 7-E

Writing Rubric 6-1: Poem



Biography: Biblically evaluating Browning’s religious beliefs

Highlights: Browning’s leaning toward theistic evolution

Application: Contrasting Tennyson’s pessimism, Browning’s optimism, and a biblical view of life and death


144

Matthew Arnold

642–44




Introduction: Arnold’s views on Christianity

Analysis: Arnold’s prose works a combination of religious skepticism and moral earnestness; “Dover Beach” an expression of late-Victorian religious pessimism and agnosticism

Application: The subtle techniques used by educators who scorn Christian beliefs


145

Christina Rossetti

644–46




Introduction: Rossetti as example of Christian devotion and personal sacrifice

Analysis: The relationship between spiritual vitality and artistic creativity; Rossetti’s worldview

Application: Comparison of Rossetti’s faith with Arnold’s skepticism


146–47

Lewis Carroll

647–56

Writing Rubric 6-1: Poem




148–50

Thomas Hardy

656–73




Introduction: The effect of Hardy’s conversion from religious orthodoxy to agnosticism on his themes and style

Analysis: Hardy as victim of Victorian rationalism; illustrations in poetry of the lingering pain of rejecting Christianity and accepting higher criticism



151–52

Gerard Manley Hopkins

674–76

Appendix 7-F

Introduction: The affirmation in Hopkins’s poetry of the existence and visibility of God

Analysis: Romanticism and the irregular beauty in God’s creation

Application: The uniqueness of each person in God’s creation

Thought and Discussion: Biblically assessing Hopkins’s portrayal of God’s nature (James 1:17); analyzing Hopkins’s moral tone in contrast to Arnold’s and Hardy’s

Highlights: Biblical allusions in “God’s Grandeur”


153

A. E. Housman

677–80

Writing Rubric 7-2: Quatrain

Introduction: The effects of religious skepticism seen in Housman’s poetry

Application: Analysis of Housman’s viewpoint with the viewpoint expressed in Romans 1–2



154

Francis Thompson

680–82




Analysis: Biblical assessment of “The Kingdom of God”

Application: A proper attitude toward addiction and the addicted



155

Rudyard Kipling

682–85




Application: Biblical assessment of Kipling’s worldview; morality as a scant refuge against life’s tragedies

156

Unit 7 Review










157

Unit 7 Test










Unit 8: The Modern Period

158–59

Unit 8 Opener

686–94

Appendix 8-A

Appendix 8-B

Appendix 8-C


Overview: Marxism and Freudianism in literature; spread of existentialism through philosophy, theology, and the arts; the valuable lessons learned from a biblical evaluation of modern literature

160

William Butler Yeats

694–96




Introduction: Biblical evaluation of Yeats’s worldview, including his romanticism and Irish nationalism

Analysis: The effects of the Fall on writing (Gen. 3:17–19)



161–63

James Joyce

696–702

Writing Rubric 8-1: Familiar Place

Introduction: Biblical evaluation of Joyce’s disillusioned cynicism

Application: Discussion of the cynicism undergirding Joyce’s writing; the biblical solution to disillusionment



164–65

D. H. Lawrence

703–5




Potential Problems: Biblical reasons for studying Lawrence despite his objectionable philosophy

Application: Biblically assessing Lawrence’s worldview assumptions



166–68

Virginia Woolf

705–8

Appendix 8-D

Introduction: Biblically evaluating Woolf’s theme of the tragic absurdity of life

169–70

Katherine Mansfield

708–12







171

Robert Graves

712–14




Application: Biblically assessing Graves’s conservative views and his ideas on the essence of life and poetry

172

Louis MacNeice

715–17




Introduction: Parallel between Solstices and prodigal son (Luke 15:11–24); challenge not to have to learn wisdom through experience

Application: MacNeice’s experience and his poetry as reflection of wisdom of Proverbs (Prov. 1:8–9)



173

Philosophies of Modern Authors










174

Unit 8 Review










175

Unit 8 Test










176–80

Final Review and Final Examination


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