Day 3 Lesson Plan



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Day 3 Lesson Plan

Food, INC.

Standards

USH.3.6 Identify the contributions to American culture made by individuals and groups. (Individuals, Society and Culture)



Example: Frederick Law Olmsted (landscape architect – Central Park), Frances Willard (educator, women’s suffrage movement), Booker T. Washington (African-American educator, Tuskegee Institute), W.E.B. DuBois (early civil rights activist), Muckrakers (journalists such as Lincoln Steffens, Jacob Riis and Upton Sinclair), Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

USH.3.7 Explain the impact of immigration, industrialization and urbanization in promoting economic growth. (Economics, Geography)



Context of the lesson

This lesson comes on day three of the unit after the class has covered muckrakers during the Progressive Movement. Students will be briefly reviewing in what they have learned from the past class and then applying those ideas to more contemporary version of muckraking in the documentary. Students will be using a guided notes worksheet with the video that will help them collect and organize their ideas. The documentary will be stopped several times in order for students to review what they have just learned and discuss their ideas as a class. It will be at this time that they will record their findings in the guided notes worksheet. This lesson also sets up the unit project that students will be asked to create on contemporary muckraking.



Essential Understandings

  1. The formation of fast food chains has changed the meat packing industry.

  2. The industrialization and monopolization of the meat packing industry has led to possibly dangerous and unhealthy food.

  3. Conditions for immigrant meat packing workers have become increasingly worse.

  4. Documentaries like Food, Inc. are contemporary versions of muckraking and are comparable to Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”.

Essential Questions

  1. How has the formation of fast food chains changed the meat packing industry?

  2. How has the industrialization and monopolization of the meat packing industry led to possibly dangerous and unhealthy food.

  3. How have conditions for immigrant meat packing workers become increasingly worse.

  4. How is Food, Inc. a contemporary version of muckraking and comparable to Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”.

Knowledge and Skill Objectives

  1. Students will know how the formation of fast food chains has changed the meat packing industry.

    1. Identify

      1. How much of the meat packing industry major business owned in the 1970s

      2. How much of the industry major business owns today.

    2. Explain how

      1. Most meat is produced by the same companies

      2. Even meat not at a fast food chain is produced for the system

  2. Students will know how the industrialization and monopolization of the meat packing industry is producing possibly dangerous and unhealthy food.

    1. Define

      1. Monopolization

      2. Industrialization

    2. Explain how

      1. Major companies now control most of the market

      2. Different brands of meat are made virtually by the same company

      3. Industrialization of meatpacking has changed the way we produce beef, poultry, and pork.

      4. Producing chickens has changed and become less humane

      5. Corn diets for cows can produce major problems

    3. Identify how

      1. How these new methods have made unhealthy food

      2. Contributed to poor conditions for animals

      3. These conditions have produced unsafe meat

  3. Students will understand how conditions for meat packing workers have become increasingly worse.

    1. Identify how

      1. Companies like Smithfield target immigrant workers for cheap labor

      2. Companies work through immigrant labor forces by contacting immigration authorities

    2. Describe

      1. The conditions meat packers work under

      2. The dangers and disease that are prevalent in meat packing factories

    3. Compare

      1. How these conditions are similar to the conditions immigrants faced in the nearly 1800s.

      2. How the labor practices are similar to those in the early 1900s

  4. Students will understand how Food, INC. is a contemporary version of muckraking and comparable to Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”.

    1. Describe

      1. The conditions and unsanitary practices of the meat packing industry described in excerpts from Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”.

      2. How conditions have changed and evolved in today’s meat packing industry.

    2. Define

      1. Kevin’s Law

      2. Pure Food and Drug Act

      3. Meat Inspection Act

    3. Compare

      1. The Pure Food and Drug Act and Meat Inspection Act to Kevin’s Law

      2. Federal Response of Teddy Roosevelt to the meat packing industry and the steps that are being taken today

    4. Explain how

      1. Documentaries compare to old forms of muckraking

Instructional Method

For this lesson I will be using parts of the Food, INC. video to go along with lecture PowerPoint slides and group discussion. Students will have a worksheet with guided notes that they will fill out as the lesson goes along.



  • Start off the lesson by asking students what they recall from the previous lessons on muckrakers and reforms in the meat packing industry during the Progressive Movement. Student should write three of these ideas down on a piece of paper and then Think, Pair, Share with the people around them before presenting the three most important ideas to the class.

  • Next use review PowerPoint slides with information on muckrakers and then move to points from Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”. This should be information from prior lessons, but it will help to frame the contemporary example of Food Inc.

  • Ask students what they think conditions in these industries are like today.

  • Show the first 8 minutes of Food, INC. that explains how the development of the fast food industry has changed the meat packing industry.

  • Stop the video and ask students how major companies have changed the industry? These answers and ideas should have a place to be recorded on the guided practice sheet.

  • Next show the two segments of the documentary that look at how chicken farming has drastically changed and the diet of corn for cows has caused potentially dangerous diseases.

  • Ask students to reiterate how chicken farming has changed? This should be recorded on the guided practice sheet.

  • Next ask students why corn is an unhealthy diet for cows and can cause disease and other complications?

  • Have students record and describe the hard conditions for animals.

  • Show the section of the documentary that follows the story of Kevin’s mother who lost her son to an Ecoli virus and now is an active lobbyist for federal intervention in the meat packing industry.

  • Have students indentify how these diseases are caused in meat packing facilities and how they can spread.

  • Have students identify Kevin’s Law by defining it.

  • Bring up PowerPoint slides on reforms such as the Pure Food and Drug Act and Meat Inspection Act. Ask students to compare them to Kevin’s Law and record these findings on their guided practice.

  • Play the part of the documentary that looks at working conditions and immigrant labor in the meat packing industry.

  • After the documentary section, have the class read an excerpt from Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” on harsh working conditions in the Chicago Meat Packing industry.

  • Have students compare today’s industry to that of Sinclair’s time and record them in their guided practice.

  • Ask students how major companies like Smithfield are using immigrant workers and how they are being treated unfairly.

  • Finally play the last part of the documentary that looks at how organic food companies are working to change the meat packing industry by promoting their products as a healthy and safe alternative.

  • Have students record their thoughts and ideas in their guided practice.

Assessments

Formative

The formative assessments I am using throughout the lesson by stopping the documentary and asking students questions about what they are watching. Students are making comparisons to previous lesson on muckraking and recording information in a guided practice. This also helps to keep students focused and engaged by breaking the documentary up into its integral parts. Students are answering these questions in a class discussion format, talking amongst their peers, and recording information on their guided practice sheet.

Summative



In groups students will research one of the major meatpacking companies and present their findings to the class. Their research should include what types of food they produce and for what companies. What major fast food or restaurant chains do they supply? Where are there main meat packing plants and on average how much product do they produce in a standard time period? Students should then search for news articles or cases brought against the company based on unfair conditions for workers, unsanitary animal conditions, or contaminated food products. The presentation should conclude with information on how the company is trying to alleviate these problems and a short description of an organic food company that is using different methods from one of the major companies to ensure healthy and safe products.


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