Curriculum Vitae Ruth Wallis Herndon



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Curriculum Vitae

Ruth Wallis Herndon

Associate Professor

Department of History

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

419-372-8445

email: rwhernd@bgsu.edu

webpage: http://personal.bgsu.edu/~rwhernd
EDUCATION

PhD in History, The American University, 1992

Dissertation: “Governing the Affairs of the Town: Continuity and Change in Rhode Island, 1750-1800”; Dissertation Director: Roger H. Brown

MA in History, The American University, 1983

Professional Diploma in Education/History, University of Hawai’i, 1979

BA in History, University of Houston at Clear Lake, 1975



ACADEMIC EMPLOYMENT

Bowling Green State University, Department of History

Associate Professor (tenured), 2007-

University of Toledo, Department of History:

Associate Professor (tenured), 2001-2007

Assistant Professor, 1996-2001

University of Rhode Island, Department of History:

Lecturer and Instructor, 1992-94



AWARDS AND PRIZES

Ralph D. Gray Best Article Prize, Society for Historians of the Early Republic, 2013

Elected Fellow, Massachusetts Historical Society, 2012

Distinguished Dissertation Award for advisee Shirley Green, BGSU, 2012

Best Article Prize, Program in Early American Economy and Society, Library Company of Philadelphia, 2003

Choice Outstanding Academic Title, American Library Association, 2002

Writing Across the Curriculum Teaching Excellence Award, University of Toledo, 2002

Outstanding Teacher Award, University of Toledo, 1999

Robert F. Heizer Best Article Prize, American Society for Ethnohistory, 1998

FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS

Franklin Research Grant, American Philosophical Society, Summer 2013

John Brockway Huntington Foundation Fellowship, The Huntington Library, June 2013

Scholar in Residence, Institute for the Study of Culture and Society, Bowling Green State University, Fall 2011

Long-Term Research Fellowship, National Endowment for the Humanities and Massachusetts Historical Society, 2006-07

Research Fellowships, Phillips Fund for Native American Research, American Philosophical Society, 2003, 1998

Major Research Grant, The Spencer Foundation, received jointly with John E. Murray, Department of Economics, University of Toledo (now at Rhodes College), 2001-2002

New England Regional Consortium Fellowship, Massachusetts Historical Society, 2001-02

Research Fellowship, John Nicholas Brown Center for American Civilization, Brown University, 1998

Summer Institute for College Teachers, National Endowment for the Humanities, University of Virginia, 1998

Research Fellowship, Mellon Foundation, Library Company of Philadelphia, 1997

Summer Research Fellowships (four summers), University of Toledo, 1997-2003



WORK IN PROGRESS

“What Kind of Un-Free Labor Was This?: The Indenture of Orson, 1764,” essay submitted to the William and Mary Quarterly; invited to revise and resubmit; under revision. Essay co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau (The Narragansett Tribe) and Alice Nash (University of Massachusetts).

“Children of Misfortune: Growing up Poor in Early New England.” Book project, research supported by NEH grant in 2006-07, ICS fellowship in 2011, Huntington Fellowship in 2013, and Franklin Research Grant in 2013; book proposal solicited by Cornell University Press.

“Popular Reaction to the Constitution: The 1788 Referendum in Rhode Island.” Journal article, co-authored with John E. Murray (Rhodes College). To be submitted to Journal of Economic History for consideration in 2014.

“Absented from History: Discourses of Power in Early New England Town Records.” Journal article. To be submitted to Journal of American History for consideration in 2014.
PUBLICATIONS: BOOKS

Children Bound to Labor: The Pauper Apprentice System in Early America (Cornell University Press, 2009). Anthology of essays co-edited with John E. Murray, Department of Economics, University of Toledo (now at Rhodes College).

Co-authored with John E. Murray: “‘A Proper and Instructive Education’: Raising Children in Pauper Apprenticeship,” 3-18 (Chapter 1);

Co-authored with Steve Hindle: “Recreating Proper Families in England and North America: Pauper Apprenticeship in Transatlantic Context,” 19-36 (Chapter 2);

Sole author: “‘Proper’ Magistrates and Masters: Binding out Poor Children in Southern New England, 1720-1820,” 39-51 (Chapter 3).


Unwelcome Americans: Living on the Margin in Early New England (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001). Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2002.

PUBLICATIONS: JOURNAL ARTICLES & BOOK CHAPTERS

“Childhood,” in Oxford Bibliographies on Line: Atlantic History, ed. Trevor Burnard (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/.

“Mapping the Boston Poor: Inmates of the Boston Almshouse, 1795-1801,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 44:1 (Summer 2013), 63-83. Co-authored with Amilcar E. Challu, BGSU.

“Poor Women and the Boston Almshouse in the Early Republic,” Journal of the Early Republic 32:3 (Fall 2012), 349-81. Winner of the Ralph D. Gray prize for best article in 2012 by the Society for Historians of the Early Republic.

“Pauper Apprenticeship in Narragansett Country: A Different Name for Slavery in Early New England,” Slavery/Anti-Slavery in New England (2003 Proceedings of the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife), ed. Peter Benes (Boston University Scholarly Publications, 2005), 56-70. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Colonial Period through the Early Republic” (overview essay), Poverty in the United States: An Encyclopedia of History, Politics, and Policy, eds. Gwendolyn Mink and Alice O’Connor (ABC-CLIO, 2004), 1-8.

“‘Who died an expence to this town’: Poor Relief in Eighteenth-Century Rhode Island,” Down and Out in Early America, ed. Billy G. Smith (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004), 135-62.

“Colonizing the Children: Indian Youngsters in Early Rhode Island,” Reinterpreting New England Indians and the Colonial Experience, eds. Colin G. Calloway and Neal Salisbury (Boston: Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 2003), 137-73. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Markets for Children in Early America: A Political Economy of Pauper Apprenticeship,” Journal of Economic History 62:2 (June 2002), 356-82. Co-authored with John E. Murray, Department of Economics, The University of Toledo (now at Rhodes College). Winner of the best article prize for 2003 from the Program in Early American Economy and Society.

“Women as Symbols of Disorder in Early Rhode Island,” Women and the Colonial Gaze, eds. Tamara L. Hunt and Micheline R. Lessard (Basingstoke, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, 2002), 79-90.

“Racialisation and feminisation of poverty in early America: Indian women as poor of the town in eighteenth-century Rhode Island,” Empire and others: British encounters with indigenous peoples, 1600-1850, eds. R. Halpern and M.J. Daunton (London: University College London Press, 1999), 186-203.

“The Right to a Name: Narragansett People and Rhode Island Officials in the Revolutionary Era,” Ethnohistory 44:3 (Summer 1997), 433-62. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe. Reprinted as chapter in After King Philip’s War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England, ed. Colin G. Calloway (Hanover: University Press of New England, 1997), 114-43. Reprinted as chapter in American Encounters: Natives and Newcomers From European Contact to Indian Removal, 1500-1850, eds. Peter C. Mancall and James H. Merrell (New York: Routledge, 2000), 426-51. Reprinted as selection in Major Problems in American Indian History, 2nd ed., eds. Albert L. Hurtado and Peter Iverson (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), 182-97. Winner of the 1998 Heizer Prize from the American Society for Ethnohistory.

“Women of ‘no particular home’: Town Leaders and Female Transients in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” Women and Freedom in Early America, ed. Larry D. Eldridge (New York University Press, 1997), 269-89.

“Literacy among New England’s Transient Poor, 1750-1800,” Research Note, Journal of Social History, 29:4 (Summer 1996), 963-65.

“The Domestic Cost of Seafaring: Town Leaders and Seamen’s Families in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920, eds. Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), 55-69.

“‘Breachy’ Sheep and Mad Dogs: Troublesome Domestic Animals in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” New England’s Creatures, 1400-1900, Annual Proceedings of the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife for 1993 (Boston: Boston University Press, 1995), 61-72.



BOOK REVIEWS

Review of Learning to Read and Write in Colonial America by E. Jennifer Monagahan, in Journal of American History (September 2006), 496-97.

Review of American Childhoods by Joseph E. Illick, in Journal of American History (December 2003), 984-85.

Review of The Healer’s Calling: Women and Medicine in Early New England by Rebecca J. Tannenbaum, in American Historical Review (December 2003), 1439-40.

Review of Orphan Trains: The Story of Charles Loring Brace and the Children He Saved and Failed by Stephen O’Connor, in New York Times Book Review, June 10, 2001, 26.

Review of The Colonial Metamorphoses in Rhode Island: A Study of Institutions in Change by Sydney V. James, ed. by Sheila L. Skemp and Bruce C. Daniels, in William and Mary Quarterly (April 2001), 526-28.

Review of Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia by Woody Holton, in Reviews in American History 29 (March 2001), 23-28.

Review of The Age of the Child: Children in America, 1890-1920 by David I. Macleod, in Journal of American History (March 2000), 1804-05.

Review of Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics, and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey by Edna G. Bay, in Women’s Studies International Forum 22:4 (1999), 454-55.

Review of Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Cultures and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolution by Lloyd Kramer, in H-Net Reviews (June 1998), http://www.h-net.msu.edu/reviews/showrev.cgi?path=5304896826718.

Review of From Virtue to Character: American Childhood, 1775-1850 by Jacqueline S. Reinier, in Journal of American History 84:2 (September 1997), 633-34.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“From Slavery to Poverty: Mothers and Children during Gradual Emancipation in Southern New England,” paper to be presented to the Sixteenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women (Big Berks), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 22-25 May 2014.

“Mapping the Boston Poor: Inmates of the Boston Almshouse, 1795-1811,” paper to be presented to the “On the Anvil of Labor History in the Revolutionary Era: Billy G. Smith and Fellow Artisans” conference, McNeil Center for Early American Studies, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 7 November 2013. Co-authored with Amilcar E. Challu, BGSU.

Discussant, book session on John E. Murray, The Charleston Orphan House: Children’s Lives in the First Public Orphanage in America (Chicago, 2013), Social Science History Association conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, 1 November 2012.

“Mapping the Boston Poor: Inmates of the Boston Almshouse, 1795-1801,” paper presented to the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture conference, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California, 15 June 2012; earlier version presented to the Social Science History Association conference, Boston, Massachusetts, 17 November 2011. Co-authored with Amilcar E. Challu, BGSU.

“Poor Mothers and the Boston Almshouse, 1795-1817,” paper presented to Society for Historians of the Early Republic conference, Rochester, New York, 25 July 2010.

“Not Slaves, Not Free: Children of Color in Revolutionary New England,” paper presented to the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture conference, University of Mississippi, 11 June 2010.

“Birth Mothers and Substitute Mothers: Women Raising Poor Children in Old and New England,” paper presented at the 14th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, University of Minnesota, 15 June 2008.

Session Comment, “New Directions in the Study of the American Apprentice,” Joint conference of the Society of Early Americanists and the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, College of William and Mary, 9 June 2007.

Chaired and commented at session, “Equal Rights and Criminal Justice in Early Republican Massachusetts,” New England Historical Association, Southern New Hampshire University, 7 May 2007.

“Another Face of Slavery: Indentured Servitude of Native Americans in Southern New England,” paper presented to the “Slavery and Slave Trade in New England” conference, Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Boston, 21-23 April 2004. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Pauper Apprenticeship in Narragansett Country: A Different Name for Slavery in Early New England,” paper presented to the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife conference, Deerfield, Massachusetts, 21 June 2003. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Hard Labor in Tender Years: Children of Color as Servant Apprentices in Early America,” invited paper presented to the “Race, Globalization, and the New Ethnic Studies” conference, Brown University, 8 March 2003.

“‘Proper and Instructive Education’: Children Bound to Labor in Early America,” paper presented to the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, at the opening session of the “‘Proper and Instructive Education’: Children Bound to Labor in Early America” conference, University of Pennsylvania, 1 November 2002. Co-authored with John E. Murray, Department of Economics, University of Toledo (now at Rhodes College).

“A Better Bargain than Poor Relief: Servant Apprenticeship in Southern New England,” paper presented to the “‘Proper and Instructive Education’: Children Bound to Labor in Early America” conference, University of Pennsylvania, 2 November 2002.

Organized and facilitated mini-conference on “Pauper Apprenticeship in Early America,” University of Toledo, 7-9 September 2001. With John E. Murray, Department of Economics, The University of Toledo (now at Rhodes College).

“Orphan Apprenticeship in Early Rhode Island,” paper presented to the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic conference, Baltimore, 21 July 2001.

Panel Member, “Transforming Classroom Culture: Revisiting the Successful Tutor-Linked Class,” Writing Across the Curriculum conference, The University of Indiana (Bloomington), 31 May 2001.

“Colonizing the Children: Narragansett Youngsters in Servitude in Early Rhode Island,” paper presented to the “Reinterpreting New England Indian History and the Colonial Experience” conference, Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Old Sturbridge Village, 21-22 April 2001. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Servants of the Community: Black Children as Bound Laborers in Eighteenth-Century New England,” paper presented to American Historical Association conference, Chicago, 9 January 2000.

“Indian-Black Relations and Race, Religion, and Ideology in America, 1780-1880,” session comment presented to American Society for Ethnohistory conference, Meshantucket, Connecticut, 22 October 1999.

“The Power of the Clerk: Rethinking Eighteenth-Century Town Records,” paper presented to the Microhistory Conference, University of Connecticut, 16 October 1999.

“Indentured Servitude of Children as a Community Strategy in Early New England,” paper presented to the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture conference, Austin, Texas, 13 June 1999.

“‘Bastards,’ Orphans, and Servants: ‘Mulatto’ and ‘Mustee’ Children in Early Rhode Island,” paper presented to the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture conference, Worcester, Massachusetts, 6 June 1998.

“Native Americans and the Poor Laws in Early New England,” paper presented to the American Historical Association conference, Seattle, 9 January 1998.

“Twice Buried in Obscurity: Poor and Female in Early Rhode Island,” paper presented to the “Rhode Island Reconsidered” conference, Brown University, 14 November 1997.

“Getting into the Almshouse in the Early Republic,” session comment presented to the Society of Historians of the Early Republic conference, Pennsylvania State University, 20 July 1997.

“Designing ‘Suitable’ Lives for the Poor: Welfare Administration in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” paper presented to Organization of American Historians conference, San Francisco, 17 April 1997.

“Racialization and Feminization of Poverty in Early America: Indian Women as ‘The Poor of the Town’ in Eighteenth-Century Rhode Island,” paper presented to the Joint Neal-Commonwealth Fund Conference, London, 14 February 1997.

“Children of the Strolling Poor: Transience and Poverty among New England’s Eighteenth-Century Children,” paper presented to Northeast Popular Culture Association conference, Worcester, Mass., 7 October 1995.

“Clearing the Public Ways: Animal Pollution and Animal Control in Eighteenth-Century Rhode Island,” paper presented to the American Studies Association conference, Nashville, Tenn., 28 October 1994.

“‘To live after the manner of an apprentice’: Public Indenture and Social Control in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” paper presented to the American Studies Association conference, Boston, Mass., 7 November 1993.

“‘Breachy’ Sheep and Mad Dogs: Troublesome Domestic Animals in Rhode Island, 1750-1800,” paper presented to the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife conference, Deerfield, Mass., 7 August 1993.

“Popular Reaction to the Constitution: The 1788 Referendum in Rhode Island,” paper presented to Society for Historians of the Early American Republic conference, Sturbridge, Mass., 22 July 1988.



SCHOLARLY SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS

“What Happened to Old Pat’s Children?: Growing Up Poor in Early America,” paper to be presented to the American Origins Seminar, University of Southern California and Huntington Library, San Marino, California, 18 January 2014.

“Children of Misfortune: Growing up Poor in Early New England,” paper presented to the Boston Area Seminar in Early American History, Massachusetts Historical Society, 6 December 2011.

Invited comment on paper by Seth Rockman, “Pauper Agency, Elite Benevolence, and Capitalist Discipline: The Political Economy of Social Welfare in the Early Republic US,” presented to the Workshop on the Political Economy of Modern Capitalism, Harvard University, 11 December 2006.

“Children of Misfortune: The Fates of Boston’s Poor Apprentices,” paper presented to the Boston Area Seminar in Early American History, Massachusetts Historical Society, 2 November 2006.

“Race and Bondage in Early New England: The Strange Case of Orson,” paper presented to the Humanities Institute, The University of Toledo, 27 January 2006.

“Research Philosophy and Methods,” invited presentation to University Honors Seminar, 19 October 2004.

“The Politics of Record-Keeping in Early New England,” paper presented to the Humanities Institute, The University of Toledo, 24 September 2004.

“Unfree Labor of Native Americans in Eighteenth-Century New England: The Strange Case of Orson,” paper presented to the Law and Social Thought Study Group, The University of Toledo, 26 March 2004.

“Seventeenth-Century America: Issues and Opportunities,” special colloquium, History Department, The University of Toledo, co-presenter, 25 April 2003.

“Children Bound to Labor in Early New England,” paper presented to the Phi Alpha Theta Colloquium, University of Toledo, 1 March 2002.

“A Hard Education for Adulthood: Pauper Apprenticeship in Early New England,” paper presented to the Law and Social Thought Study Group, The University of Toledo, 30 November 2001.

“Narragansett Communities in Nineteenth-Century Rhode Island,” paper presented to the John Nicholas Brown Center American Seminar, Brown University, 14 March 2001. Co-authored with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

“Narratives of Warning Out,” invited paper presented to the Southern California Early Americanists Association, University of California–Riverside, 4 March 2000.

“Black Children as Indentured Servants in Early America,” paper presented to the Africana Studies Brown Bag Seminar, University of Toledo, 9 February 1999.

“Unwelcome Americans: The Transient Poor in Eighteenth-Century New England,” invited lecture, Humanities Institute Showcase Series, The University of Toledo, 27 January 1999.

“‘Bastards,’ Orphans, and Servants: Reconstructing the Lives of Children in Early America,” paper presented to the Ohio Seminar in Early American History and Culture, Ohio State University, 17 April 1998.

“‘Bastards,’ Orphans, and Servants: Reconstructing the Lives of Children in Early America,” paper presented to the Phi Alpha Theta Seminar, The University of Toledo, 10 April 1998.

“Women of Color as the Poor of the Town in Eighteenth-Century New England,” paper presented to the Newberry Seminar in Early American History, Chicago, 31 October 1996.

“Warned Out in New England: Eighteenth Century Tales of Trouble,” paper presented to the Philadelphia (McNeil) Center for Early American Studies Seminar, Philadelphia, 22 September 1995.


Member, Law and Social Thought Study Group, University of Toledo, 2001-2005.

Member, Humanities Institute, University of Toledo; elected as junior member 1998-2001, elected as senior member 2004-2007.



INVITED SCHOLARLY LECTURES

“Mapping the Boston Poor: Residential Patterns and Mobility of the Boston Almshouse Inmates, 1795-1805,” invited lecture at the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 21 February 2013. Co-authored with Amilcar E. Challu, BGSU.

“What Happened to Old Pat’s Children?: Welfare and Childhood in Early America,” Institute for the Study of Culture and Society Faculty Fellows Lecture Series, Bowling Green State University, 1 November 2011.

“The Strange Disappearance of Abel Tanner: A Mystery Story from Early America,” address to the History Department Awards Ceremony/P.A.T. Initiation, Bowling Green State University, 20 April 2008.

“Children of Misfortune: The Fates of Boston’s Poor Apprentices,” University of Connecticut History Department, 6 December 2006.

Panelist, “Race: The Power of an Illusion,” University of Toledo Forum, 2 March 2006.

“The Truth is the Truth is the Truth: Writing Native New England History,” lecture in the “Native People of New England Lecture Series,” Holy Cross College, Worcester, Massachusetts, 21 April 2004. Co-presented with Ella Wilcox Sekatau, The Narragansett Tribe.

Panelist, “Discovering the Real Indian: New Perspectives on Native American History and Culture,” Humanities Institute Public Seminar, The University of Toledo, 12 April 2000.

“Using Poor Law to Define Community in Early Rhode Island,” Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University, 6 May 1998.

INVITED PUBLIC LECTURES

“The Boston Almshouse—Welfare in the Colonial Era,” Toledo Colony of Mayflower Descendants, 26 June 2010.

“The Fate of Boston’s Poor Apprentices,” Toledo Colony of Mayflower Descendants, 29 March 2008.

“Children Bound to Labor in Early America,” Toledo Colony of Mayflower Descendants, 18 March 2006.

“Unwelcome Americans,” Ohio Genealogical Society, Lucas County Chapter, 8 April 2002, and Toledo Colony of the Mayflower Descendants, 2 March 2002.

“Women in Early America,” Ohio Genealogical Society, Lucas County Chapter, 17 February 2001.

“Why Am I An Historical Detective?” The Compass Club, Toledo, Ohio, 12 January 2000.

“Poor Women in Early America,” Toledo Colony of Mayflower Descendants, 18 September 1999.



SERVICE: DEPARTMENT/COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY
Service to BGSU, Department of History

Chair Succession Committee, 2012-2013

Graduate Committee Member, 2010-2014

Education Liaison, 2008-2014

Webpage Manager, 2008-2014

Communications Committee Chair, 2008-2014

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Member, 2007-2010

Capstone Course 480 Sub-committee Chair, 2007-2009

Junior Faculty Teaching Mentor, 2007-2009 (Trimmer, Mancuso)
Service to University of Toledo, university level

Sabbaticals Committee Member, 2005-2006

Center for Teaching and Learning Advisory Committee Member, 2004-2006

New Faculty Orientation, Syllabus Design Workshop leader, 2004-2006

Faculty Senate Promotion and Tenure Workshop panelist, 2002 & 2003

Writing Across the Curriculum Committee, Member, 2001-2002

NCA Accreditation Committee, Editorial Sub-Committee Member, 2000-2001

Outstanding Teacher Award Committee Member, 1999-2000

First Year Orientation course for students (designed and taught), 1997 & 1998

New Faculty Orientation Panelist, 1997


Service to University of Toledo, College of Arts and Sciences

Strategic Plan Committee, Faculty Development Subcommittee Member, 2003-2004

Dean’s Essay Prize Committee Member, 1998-1999

First Year Information Course Faculty, 1998


Service to University of Toledo, Department of History

Graduate Committee Member, 2004-2006

Women’s Caucus Facilitator, 2004-2006

Public History Committee Member, 2004-2005

Personnel Committee Member, 2003-2004

Faculty Search Committee, Member, 2002-2003

Library Committee Chair, 1997-2001

Assessment Committee Member, 1998-1999

Faculty Advisor to Phi Alpha Theta History Honorary Society, 1999-2004

Annual History Day judge, 1997-2006

Developed and administered workshops for graduate students on the following topics:

Taking Comprehensive Examinations (annually 1999-2003);

Job-Hunting (2000);

Plagiarism (2002);

Grant-Writing (2003).

OTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Manuscript reviews for William and Mary Quarterly, New England Quarterly, Slavery and Abolition, Rhode Island History, Oxford University Press, Cornell University Press, and faculty grant proposal reviews for Montana State University.

Annual Conference Program Committee, Society for Historians of the Early Republic, 2010-11 (John Larson, Chair).

Award Selection Committee, National Endowment for the Humanities and Massachusetts Historical Society Long-Term Fellowship, 2008.

Faculty, “Expanding America” (Teaching American History Summer Seminar), Bowling Green State University and Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Fremont, Ohio, 14-15 June 2007.

Faculty, “History Links” (Teaching American History Saturday Colloquium Series), Bowling Green State University and Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Fremont, Ohio, 18 November 2006.

Faculty, “History Links” (Teaching American History Summer Seminar), Bowling Green State University and Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Fremont, Ohio, 12-13 June 2006.

Faculty, “Read History,” Teaching American History Summer Institute, The University of Delaware. 22 July 2004.



COURSES TAUGHT
Undergraduate Courses:

Early America (America to 1865) American Slave Trade & Slavery

Colonial America Race and Gender in Early America

The American Revolution Everyday Life in Early America

Creation and Crisis of the Union, 1789-1860 Women in Early America

Natives and Newcomers Historical Methods & Historiography

History Capstone Research Seminar (topics):

Early America Revolutionary America

Boston, 1600-1970 The Atlantic World (spring 2014)
Graduate Seminars:

Issues in Early American History

Early America in the Atlantic World

Colonial America

Early America (to 1800)

Natives and Newcomers

Slavery and Slave Trade in the U.S.

Teaching History in College

The Historical Profession
GRADUATE WORK DIRECTED
M.A. Theses:

Bonnie-Jean Chudzinski, “Workers, Newspapers, and the American Revolution in Philadelphia and Charles-Town, 1769-1780.” (University of Toledo, 2000)

James J. Schaefer, “Gallant Gentlemen and Common Cowards: A New Perspective on Soldiers Accused of Cowardice during the American Revolution.” (University of Toledo, 2000)

Kristina Markel, “Shoenbrunn: A Haven for Devout Christian Delaware.” (University of Toledo, 2001)

James Weeks, “Brewing in Seventeenth-Century Maryland.” (Bowling Green State University, 2001)

Mary Patchen, “Apprenticeship on the Frontier: Indentured Children in Antebellum Ohio.” (University of Toledo, 2003)

Christine Eisel, “Testified Gossip: English Women, the Courts, and Gendered Power in a Seventeenth-Century Virginia Community.” (University of Toledo, 2005)

Shirley Green, “The Ties that Bind and Set Loose: The Story of the Franck Brothers in the Era of the American Revolution.” (University of Toledo, 2005)

Bethany Harding, “Confronting the Stranger: Sermons Against the Religion of Universalism During the 1780s.” (University of Toledo, 2005)

Adam Tharpe, “‘A Character of Convention’: The Correspondence of John Adams and Benjamin Rush on the Washington Image.” (University of Toledo, 2006)

Lisa Lamson, “‘Strange Flesh’ in the City on a Hill: Early Massachusetts Sodomy Laws and Puritan Spiritual Anxiety.“ (Bowling Green State University, 2014)

Megan Cross, “Formulas for Cultural Success: Behavior Prescriptions in Early American Translations of Perrault’s Classic Fairy Tales.“ (Bowling Green State University, 2014)


Ph.D. Dissertations:

James J. Schaefer, “The Whole Duty of Man: Charles Lee and the Politics of Reputation, Masculinity, and Identity during the Revolutionary Era, 1755-1783.” (University of Toledo, 2006)

Shirley Green, “Free Born Men of Color: The Franck Brothers in Revolutionary North America, 1755-1820.” (Bowling Green State University, 2011). Winner of the Bowling Green State University Distinguished Dissertation Award, 2012.

Christine Eisel, “‘Several Unhandsome Words’: The Politics of Gossip in Early Virginia.” (Bowling Green State University, 2012)






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