Curriculum map: a year at a glance u. S. History



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CURRICULUM MAP: A YEAR AT A GLANCE

U. S. HISTORY

Greenbrier High School Teacher: Ferguson/Parsons/Wortham

August 2013 – May 2014 Grade: 11 Subject: U. S. History

UNIT

Creating A Nation 1763-1789

The Young Republic 1789-1850

The Crisis of Union

1848-1877

The Birth of Modern America 1865-1901

Imperialism and Progressivism 1890-1920

The 1920s/Great Depression/WWII 1920-1945



OBJECTIVE:

Students will:



  • Learn about the causes of the French and Indian War.

  • See how and why British policies in the colonies changed after 1763.

  • Discover the impact of the American Revolution.

  • Describe the early government of the United States.

  • Find out what the Founding Fathers hoped to achieve as they assembled for the Constitutional Convention.

  • Realize how the structure of the government under the Constitution divides power.

  • Find out about arguments for and against a Bill of Rights.

Students will:

  • See why the election of 1800 was a turning point.

  • Find out why war broke out with Britain in 1812 and how the war's end affected the United States.

  • Find out how Americans tried to advance the culture of the new nation.

  • Lean about some important social changes of the early 1800s.

  • Learn how the U.S. economy expanded during the early 1800s.

  • Find out what caused the growth of cities and what problems arose as they grew.

  • See some of the signs of a new nationalism after the war of 1812.

  • Learn how the antislavery movement arose and grew.

  • See why reform movements heightened tensions between the North and the South.

Students will:

  • Describe the Northern and Southern views on slavery.

  • Summarize the changes in political parties in the 1850s.

  • Explain how slavery dominated national politics from 1856 to 1858.

  • Summarize events leading to the start of the war at Fort Sumter.

  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the North and the South when the war began.

  • Compare the effects of wartime politics on the Confederate and Union governments.

  • Summarize the issues and the outcome of the election of 1864, the end of the war and the assassination of President Lincoln.

  • Explain the conditions in the South following the Civil War.

  • Explain the significance of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.

  • Review the major successes and failures of Reconstruction.

Students will:

  • Determine the kinds of conditions that lured people to migrate to the West.

  • List the factors that caused changes in the life of the Plains Indians.

  • Discover how settlers overcame barriers in farming the plains.

  • Examine the legacy of Populism.

  • Find out how business influenced politics during the Gilded Age.

  • Share the experiences of immigrants in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

  • Find out why cities expanded in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

  • Examine efforts to control immigration and personal behavior in the late 1800s.

  • Probe the kinds of discrimination encountered by African Americans after Reconstruction.

  • Discover how women's work in the home changed at the turn of century.

  • Examine the issues in the debate over women's equality.

Students will:

  • Find out about the factors that led to the growth of imperialism around the world.

  • Learn about the ways in which the United States began to expand its interests abroad in the 1800s.

  • Find out about events leading up to and following the Spanish-American War.

  • Examine the main arguments raised by the anti-imperialists.

  • Find out how American imperialism was viewed from abroad.

  • Learn the key goals of Progressives.

  • Understand why Progressive reforms met with resistance.

  • Discover the limitations placed on the achievements of Progressivism.

  • Read about the status of the suffrage movement by the turn of the century.

  • Identify events that moved the United States toward war.

  • Explain the main points of the peace treaty and describe Wilson's efforts to gain approval for the treaty.

Students will:

  • Realize why the 1920s was called the Jazz Age, and how the jazz spirit affected the arts.

  • Learn about the effects of Prohibition on society.

  • Find out how racial tensions changed after World War I.

  • See how Republican leadership during the Harding and Coolidge presidencies shaped the 1920s.

  • Discover the ways in which industrial growth affected the economy of the 1920s.

  • Observe the danger signs that were present in the economy of the late 1920s.

  • Become familiar with the main causes of the Great Depression.

  • See the signs of change Americans began to notice in the early 1930s.

  • Realize why the election of 1932 was a significant turning point in American politics.

  • Learn about some of the New Deal's shortcomings and limitations.

  • See what lasting effects can be attributed to the New Deal.

  • Find out why the United States chose neutrality in the 1930s.

  • See how American involvement in the European conflict grew from 1939 to 1941.

  • Discover why Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor led the United States to declare war.

  • Learn about ways in which the government prepared the economy for war.

  • See how the war affected daily life on the home front.

  • Discover some events that marked the end of the war in Europe.

  • See which Allied victories turned the tide of war in the Pacific.

EXTENDED TEXT:

Build Students’ Knowledge



COMPLEXITY:

1570

1610

  • Lincoln’s “House Divided” Speech

(CCCS book)

(CCCS book)

  • “I Will Fight No More” Speech-Chief Joseph

(CCCS book)

SHORT TEXT:

COMPLEXITY:

1540

  • Civil Disobedience, Thoreau

1240

  • Gettysburg Address

(CCCS book)

  • Fourteen Points

1360

  • Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms” Speech

1360

INFORMATIONAL

TEXT:

COMPLEXITY:

  • Declaration of Independence

1570

  • Preamble to the Constitution

1540

  • Federalist No. 1

(CCCS book)

  • Federalist No. 10

(CCCS book)

  • Washington’s Farewell Address

1610

  • Lincoln’s “House Divided” Speech

(CCCS book)

  • Gettysburg Address

(CCCS book)

  • Plessey v. Ferguson (1896)

1550

  • Fourteen Points

1360

CLOSE READ:

  • Declaration of Independence



  • Preamble to the Constitution



  • Gettysburg Address



  • The Killer Angels

RESEARCH

PROJECT:

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

Student-Directed Oral or Mixed Media Presentations

WRITING:

Argumentative

Informational

Explanatory

Narrative

Argumentative question from the Bill of Rights/Preamble

Explanatory question regarding importance of the Gettysburg Address

Argumentative question concerning opposing viewpoints on World War II



TERMINOLOGY:

Boston Massacre, George Washington, Sons of Liberty, Common Sense, Articles of Confederation, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism

Marbury v. Madison, Louisiana Purchase, Treaty of Ghent, Era of Good Feelings, Missouri Compromise, spoils system, Trail of Tears, Second Great Awakening, temperance movement, Seneca Falls Convention

Manifest Destiny, plantation agriculture, Frederick Douglass, Underground Railroad, John Brown, popular sovereignty, Compromise of 1850, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln, Radical Republicans, Emancipation Proclamation, 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, "black codes", sharecropping, Compromise of 1877

Plains Indians, Helen Hunt Jackson, Interstate Commerce Act, vertical integration, horizontal integration, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, Social Darwinism, Ellis Island, new immigrants, political machine, laissez-faire, Populist Party, Plessey v. Ferguson (1896)

Alfred Thayer Mahan, Anti-Imperialist League, William Jennings Bryan, Muckrakers, Pure Food and Drug Act, Progressive Party, American Expeditionary Force,

Fourteen Points, League of Nations

Teapot Dome, Fundamentalism, Prohibition, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, New Deal, Appeasement, concentration camp, strategic materials, Pearl Harbor, “Double V” campaign, "Rosie the Riveter", rationing, Japanese internment camps, Manhattan Project, United Nations



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