Curriculum framework 2008 United States History to 1865 Board of Education Commonwealth of Virginia



Download 209.51 Kb.
Page3/4
Date conversion16.05.2016
Size209.51 Kb.
1   2   3   4

STANDARD USI.6b

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes and results of the American Revolution by

b) identifying how political ideas shaped the revolutionary movement in America and led to the Declaration of Independence.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

New political ideas led to a desire for independence and a democratic government in the American colonies.


The Declaration of Independence proclaimed independence from Great Britain. It stated that people have natural (inherent) rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.


What ideas and/or philosophies about government were expressed in the Declaration of Independence?


Key philosophies in the Declaration of Independence were based upon ideas first expressed by European philosophers.


Key philosophies in the Declaration of Independence

  • People have “certain unalienable rights” (rights that cannot be taken away)—to life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness.

  • People establish government to protect those rights.

  • Government derives power from the people.

  • People have a right and a duty to change a government that violates their rights.

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)


Make connections between the past and the present (USI.1b)
Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Interpret excerpts from notable documents. (USI.1h)

STANDARD USI.6c

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes and results of the American Revolution by

c) describing key events and the roles of key individuals in the American Revolution, with emphasis on George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Many individuals played important roles in shaping events of the American Revolution.


Who were some of the key individuals in the Revolutionary War?


What role did key individuals play in the Revolutionary War?
What were some of the key events that occurred during the Revolutionary War period?


Key individuals

  • King George III: British king during the Revolutionary era

  • Lord Cornwallis: British general who surrendered at Yorktown

  • John Adams: Championed the cause of independence

  • George Washington: Commander of the Continental Army

  • Thomas Jefferson: Major author of the Declaration of Independence

  • Patrick Henry: Outspoken member of the House of Burgesses; inspired colonial patriotism with his “Give me liberty or give me death” speech

  • Benjamin Franklin: Prominent member of the Continental Congress; helped frame the Declaration of Independence; helped gain French support for American independence


Other important individuals

  • Phillis Wheatley: Enslaved African American who wrote poems and plays supporting American independence and who eventually gained her freedom

  • Paul Revere: Patriot who made a daring ride to warn colonists of British arrival


Key events

  • Boston Massacre: Colonists in Boston were shot after taunting British soldiers.

  • Boston Tea Party: Samuel Adams and Paul Revere led patriots in throwing tea into Boston Harbor to protest tea taxes.

  • First Continental Congress: Delegates from all colonies except Georgia met to discuss problems with Great Britain and to promote independence.

  • Battles at Lexington and Concord: The first armed conflicts of the Revolutionary War

  • Approval of the Declaration of Independence: The colonies declared independence from Great Britain (July 4, 1776).

  • Battle of Saratoga: This American victory was the turning point in the war.

  • Surrender at Yorktown: This was the colonial victory over forces of Lord Cornwallis that marked the end of the Revolutionary War.

  • Signing of the Treaty of Paris: Great Britain recognized American independence in this treaty.

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)


Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Analyze and interpret maps to explain historical events. (USI.1f)
Interpret patriotic slogans and excerpts from notable speeches and documents. (USI.1h)

STANDARD USI.6d

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes and results of the American Revolution by

d) explaining reasons why the colonies were able to defeat Great Britain.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Defense of the colonists’ own land, strong beliefs, and capable leadership contributed to the American victory in the Revolutionary War.


What advantages helped the American colonists win the Revolutionary War?




Colonial advantages

  • Some colonists’ defense of their own land, principles, and beliefs

  • Additional support from France

  • Strong leadership

Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)


Analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events. (USI.1f)

STANDARD USI.7a

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by

a) identifying the weaknesses of the government established by the Articles of Confederation.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

The Articles of Confederation was a constitution written during the American Revolution to establish the powers of the new national government.


What were the basic weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation?




Articles of Confederation

  • Provided for a weak national government

  • Gave Congress no power to tax or regulate commerce among the states

  • Provided for no common currency

  • Gave each state one vote regardless of size

  • Provided for no executive or judicial branches

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)


Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Analyze and interpret maps to explain historical events. (USI.1f)

STANDARD USI.7b

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by

b) describing the historical development of the Constitution of the United States.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

The development of the Constitution of the United States was significant to the foundation of the American republic.


The Constitution of the United States of America established a federal system of government based on power being shared between the national and state governments.

What events led to the development of the Constitution of the United States?


What people helped develop the Constitution of the United States?


Confederation to Constitution

  • Weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation led to the effort to draft a new constitution.


The Constitutional Convention

  • State delegates met in Philadelphia and decided not to revise the Articles of Confederation but to write a new constitution.

  • George Washington was elected president of the Constitutional Convention.

  • Delegates debated over how much power should be given to the new national government and how large and small states should be represented in the new government.

  • The structure of the new national government included three separate branches of government:

  • Legislative

  • Executive

  • Judicial

  • The Great Compromise decided how many votes each state would have in the Senate and the House of Representatives.

  • The Constitution was signed at the end of the convention.


Ratification of the Constitution

  • A minimum of nine of the thirteen states had to vote in favor of the Constitution before it could become law.


The Bill of Rights

  • Based on the Virginia Declaration of Rights (George Mason) and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (Thomas Jefferson)

  • These first ten amendments to the Constitution provide a written guarantee of individual rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion).

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)


Make connections between the past and the present. (USI.1b)
Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)

STANDARD USI.7c

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by

c) describing the major accomplishments of the first five presidents of the United States.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Congress and the first five presidents made decisions establishing a strong government that helped the nation grow in size and power.


What major national issues and events did the first five presidents face?


All of the first five presidents were Virginians except John Adams.


Accomplishments during the first five presidencies

  • George Washington

  • Federal court system was established.

  • The Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution of the United States of America.

  • Plans were created for development of the national capital in Washington, D.C. Benjamin Banneker, an African American astronomer and surveyor, helped complete the design for the city.

  • John Adams

  • A two-party system emerged during his administration.

  • He bought Louisiana from France (Louisiana Purchase).

  • Lewis and Clark explored new land west of the Mississippi River.

  • James Madison

  • The War of l812 caused European nations to gain respect for the United States.

  • James Monroe

  • He introduced the Monroe Doctrine warning European nations not to interfere in the Western Hemisphere.

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)


Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Interpret excerpts from notable documents. (USI.1h)

STANDARD USI.8a

The student will demonstrate knowledge of westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

a) describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Between 1801 and 1861, exploration was encouraged as America underwent vast territorial expansion and settlement.


What new territories became part of the United States between 1801 and 1861?




New territories added to the United States after 1801

  • Louisiana Purchase

  • Jefferson bought land from France (the Louisiana Purchase), which doubled the size of the United States.

  • In the Lewis and Clark expedition, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark explored the Louisiana Purchase and the Oregon Territory from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean.

  • Florida

  • Spain gave Florida to the United States through a treaty.

  • Texas

  • Texas was added to the United States after it became an independent republic.

  • Oregon

  • The Oregon Territory was divided by the United States and Great Britain.

  • California

  • War with Mexico resulted in California and the southwest territory becoming part of the United States.

Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)


Analyze and interpret maps to explain historical events. (USI.1f)

STANDARD USI.8b

The student will demonstrate knowledge of westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

b) identifying the geographic and economic factors that influenced the westward movement of settlers.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Westward migration was influenced by geography and economic opportunity.


What factors influenced westward migration?




Geographic and economic factors that influenced westward movement

  • Population growth in the eastern states

  • Availability of cheap, fertile land

  • Economic opportunity, e.g., gold (California Gold Rush), logging, farming, freedom (for runaway slaves)

  • Cheaper and faster transportation, e.g., rivers and canals (Erie Canal), steamboats

  • Knowledge of overland trails (Oregon and Santa Fe)

  • Belief in the right of “Manifest Destiny”—the idea that expansion was for the good of the country and was the right of the country

Make connections between the past and the present. (USI.1b)


Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events. (USI.1f)

STANDARD USI.8c

The student will demonstrate knowledge of westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

c) describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

Prior to the Civil War, most industrialization in America was in the North; however, the equipment produced in the North had an impact on the farming society of the South.


How did inventions and entrepreneurs affect the lives of Americans?




Terms to know

inventor: A person who is the first to think of or make something

entrepreneur: A person who organizes resources to bring a new or better good or service to market in hopes of earning a profit
New technologies and their impact on society


  • The cotton gin was invented by Eli Whitney. It increased the production of cotton and thus increased the need for slave labor to cultivate and pick the cotton.

  • Jo Anderson (an enslaved African American) and Cyrus McCormick worked to invent the reaper. McCormick was an entrepreneur who brought the reaper to market. The reaper increased the productivity of the American farmer.

  • The steamboat was improved by the entrepreneur Robert Fulton. It eventually provided faster river transportation connecting Southern plantations and farms to Northern industries and Western territories.

  • The steam locomotive provided faster land transportation.

Make connections between the past and the present. (USI.1b)


Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
Identify the costs and benefits of specific choices made, including the consequences, both intended and unintended, of the decisions and how people and nations responded to positive and negative incentives. (USI.1i)

STANDARD USI.8d

The student will demonstrate knowledge of westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

d) identifying the main ideas of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements.


Essential Understandings

Essential Questions

Essential Knowledge

Essential Skills

The abolitionists worked to end slavery.


The women’s suffrage movement helped women gain equal rights.

What were the main ideas expressed by the abolitionists?


What were the main ideas expressed during the women’s suffrage movement?


Abolitionist movement

  • Most abolitionists demanded immediate freeing of the slaves.

  • Abolitionists believed that slavery was wrong.

  • Morally wrong

  • Cruel and inhumane

  • A violation of the principles of democracy

  • Abolitionist leaders included both men and women.

  • Harriet Tubman led hundreds of enslaved African Americans to freedom along the Underground Railroad.

  • William Lloyd Garrison wrote the Liberator newspaper and worked for the immediate emancipation of all enslaved African Americans.

  • Frederick Douglass wrote the North Star newspaper and worked for rights for African Americans and women to better their lives.


Women’s suffrage movement

  • Supporters declared that “All men and women are created equal.”

  • Supporters believed that women were deprived of basic rights:

  • Denied the right to vote

  • Denied educational opportunities, especially higher education

  • Denied equal opportunities in business

  • Limited in the right to own property

  • The movement was led by strong women who began their campaign before the Civil War and continued after the war had ended.

  • Isabella (Sojourner) Truth, a former enslaved African American, was a nationally known advocate for equality and justice.

  • Susan B. Anthony was an advocate to gain voting rights for women and equal rights for all.

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton played a leadership role in the women’s rights movement.

Make connections between the past and the present. (USI.1b)


Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (USI.1d)
Interpret patriotic slogans. (USI.1h)
1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page