Curriculum & Pedagogy Program Committee Report 2012 Co-Chairs: Debra Freedman and Erik Malewski Committee Members



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Session T-300 11:30am-12:30am

Session T-301
Christianity as Post-colonial Resistance?: Black Liberation Theology, The Black Church, Womanist Theology as Sites for Pedagogical Decolonization - CCP

Kirsten T. Edwards, The University of Oklahoma, Kirsten.T.Edwards@ou.edu


This paper investigates Christianity specifically enacted within the Black Church religious experience as method to post-colonial resistance. Further, I will discuss the pedagogical import for decolonizing practices in Euro-American classrooms as inspired by this religio-cultural community.

How explicit and implicit curriculum approaches increased religious intolerance and social class differences in Pakistani Society?

Afshan Huma, Michigan State University, humaafsh@msu.edu


This paper is a literature review and critical analysis of elementary and secondary schools curriculum and pedagogy in Pakistan. Pakistan is facing social and religious conflicts within the country. Religious extremism becomes root cause of specific social class differences, prejudice and increasing rates of target killings in the name of religion.

Teaching structures and perceived classroom power relations that impact the use of cultural interpretation - CCP

Eva Rose B. Washburn-Repollo, Chaminade University, eva.washburn@chaminade.edu


Academic teaching structures characterized by perceived power relations between teachers and students negatively impact the use of cultural interpretation of ELL students. The results of a study with Pacific Island college students in reading classrooms led to a preliminary formulation of a theory of classroom design to promote cultural interpretation.

Session T-302
Developing curriculum that will challenge hegemonic practices based on privilege - CCP

Marilyn F. Cullen-Reavill, Metropolitan State University of Denver, mcullenr@msudenver.edu


This presentation will be an interactive discussion around six essential elements for developing and implementing curriculum and classroom practices that challenge cultural biases and privilege. Examples for implementation of these concepts at all grade levels will be given and experiences, which reinforce these concepts, will be shared.

Inquiry, civic engagement, and projects of possibility: A new educational science that honors reflective practices critical to our public actions.

Anne Slonaker, Castleton State College, Anne.slonaker@castleton.edu

Emily Gleason, Castleton State College, Emily.gleason@castleton.edu
We heed Elizabeth Ellsworth’s charge to, “use what has already been thought as a provocation and a call to invention” (2005, p. 165), to represent our inquiry practices that are not new but transform our thinking about teaching and learning in our K-12 licensure program.

Eighth graders opinions on diversity within the science classroom

Denise Gordon, Applied Learning Academy, FWISD, denise.gordon@fwisd.org; Additional authors/presenters: past 8th grade students


How does an eighth grader view and describe diversity? Written narratives by typical eighth graders help to explain and understand diversity inside an urban public school science classroom.

Session T-303
The Common Core Standards Initiative: Implications for Marginalized Students’ Success

Carolyn R. Taylor, Dougherty County School System, Albany State University, deltadeltacrt@yahoo.com


A national crisis in public school education continues to prevail, the enormous performance gap between Caucasian groups and marginalized groups, despite the many educational reforms and the overhauling of teacher preparation. This paper takes a critical look at the Common Core Standards and examines its implication for marginalized groups success.

Race…To…Common Core: Investigating the Common Core Standards with regards to race in Southern Louisiana – CCP

Heather Stone, Louisiana State University, hstone2@lsu.edu


This paper explores through interviews with teachers and looks at document analysis to identify ways to create a racially balanced curriculum for all students. These methods can then be integrated into the new National Common Core standards in order to create a curriculum based on the equality of race.
Session T-304
On Mechanisms, Meaning, and the Monstrous: A Review of Process in Public Pedagogy Literature

Jake Burdick, Purdue University, burdics@purdue.edu

Jennifer A. Sandlin, Arizona State University, jennifer.sandlin@asu.edu
This presentation offers a focused review of literature centered on the pedagogical processes and mechanisms that undergird educational activity outside of formal institutions of schooling. We describe three forms of pedagogical address present in the literature – Marxist/rationalist, aesthetic/relational, and posthuman – and critically examine the value systems each perspective represents.

A Posthuman Curriculum: A Response to Hyperreal Panopticism

Brad M. Petitfils, Loyola University New Orleans, bpetit@loyno.edu


A revisiting of Foucault’s 1982 notions of “Technologies of the Self” presents the provocative proposition of “hyperreal panopticism” – a new model for examining corporate control over the lives of young people. One possible space of resistance is found in a posthuman curriculum, which seeks a new humanism for the 21st century.

Unsilencing voices: A study of zoo signs and their language of authority

Katherine Fogelberg, Texas Christian University, k.fogelberg@tcu.edu


Critical Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis are applied to zoo signs to investigate manifestations of institutional power. I argue that these subtleties affect visitors and animals through exclusion. The importance of informal learning in American society has been established; this study discusses zoo signs in the context of such learning.

Session T-305
Developing critical agency in times of ideological deceptions: Towards a Nepantlera Pedagogy – CCP

Elva Reza-López, Boise State University, elvareza-lopez@boisestate.edu

Luis Huerta-Charles, New Mexico State University, lhuertac@nmsu.edu
In this presentation we outline a critical-theoretical-pedagogical framework that aims to develop pre-service and service teachers’ critical agency for social activism. Through a Nepantlera Pedagogy, we question dominant ideological deceptions in the field of bilingual education, its curriculum and pedagogy and the need to (Re) think and problematize these deceptions.

Subtractive Curriculum: A Critical Look at the STAAR Test

Anna M. Meyerpeter-Newman, University of Texas at Brownsville, anewman@lfcisd.net


This critical study was inspired by the most recent bout of high stakes testing in Texas. This paper reflects the lived experience of a secondary science specialist as I investigate the politics of determining the passing scores and discuss the implications for all students in south Texas.

Impact of the “Extra” on Pre-service Teachers Dispositions

Desha L. Williams, Kennesaw State University, dwill178@kennesaw.edu

Belinda Edwards, Kennesaw State University, bedwards@kennesaw.edu
Teacher preparation programs brim with content and pedagogy. However, cultural dispositions may go unheeded, especially in mathematics programs where many see the discipline as culture-free. This presentation examines the impact on the development of cultural dispositions through the extension of a traditional MAT program.
Session T-306
The Lost Carpetbagger: Complicating place in the South for a northern-born white teacher

David Humpal, Texas A&M University, dhumpal@tamu.edu


A recently retired high school English teacher describes his journey to find place in the South despite his northern upbringing, an attitude of prejudice reduction pedagogy, medically diagnosed Major Depressive Disorder, and efforts to utilize psychoanalytical tools.

Living in a literary desert? History of Education in the South Reconsidered

Seth Eisworth, Louisiana State University, seiswo2@lsu.edu


In popular culture, Louisianans and Southerners are often seen as poorly educated and backwards. By examining the archival evidence from the antebellum period, this study attempts to establish a counter-narrative where education has been valued historically. This positive story can then be used to change the popular stereotypes.
Town Hall/Lunch 12:45pm-2:45pm
On Thursday our Town Hall will focus on the business of the Curriculum and Pedagogy Group. As part of your registration for this conference, you officially become a member of the Curriculum & Pedagogy Group. We invite all members to attend this meeting and engage in open and participatory dialogue related to the overall vision and governance of the Curriculum and Pedagogy Group. Lunch will be served.

Session T-400 3:00pm-4:00pm

Session T-401
Recovering Curriculum History In Intercultural and Cosmopolitan Contexts: Reconstructing Intellectual History
This symposium, advancing the internationalization of curriculum studies, answers recent calls in curriculum studies for intellectual history in intercultural and cosmopolitan contexts. In pursuing this end, presenters work through historical biographies and intellectual histories to reconstruct radical traditions in education.
Recovering Catholic Liberation Theology: Life, Testimony, and Pedagogy of Bartolomé de Las Casas

James C. Jupp, Georgia Southern University, jcjupp@gmail.com


"A shield against the spiteful and calumnious arrows shot at us": Afro-Franco-Creole–Catholic Education in New Orleans 1810-1860

Petra Munro Hendry, Louisiana State University, phendry@lsu.edu


Hermeneutics of Emancipation in Habermas: Infusing Critical Theory with Communicative Discourse and Inter-subjectivity

Baudelaire Ulysse, National-Louis University, baudelaire.ulysse@nl.edu


Intellectual History and Autobiography: Process Philosophy, Alfred North Whitehead, Self-Social Reconstruction

Patrick Slattery, Texas A&M University, patslat@aol.com


Session T-402
How many adjectives do you need? The complexity of identity (re)(de)construction - CCP

Freyca Calderon-Berumen, Texas Christian University, F.calderoneberumen@tcu.edu

Karla O’Donald, Texas Christian University, k.odonald@tcu.edu

Sherrie Reynolds, Texas Christian University, s.reynolds@tcu.edu


We proposed, through the lens of Gloria Anzaldúa and her followers, in conversation with curriculum scholars like Whitlock, Slattery, Pinar, McLaren, and others to tell the story of the overly hyphenated gringa-Irish-dyke, Mexican-Latina-Texan, and Mexican-Latina-Immigrant. We embrace our hybrid/borderland identities and we want to complicate our conversation about them by acknowledging their complexity.
Session T-403
Bringing learning to life: Engaging pre-service teachers in the political and practical realms of education

Daniel Ciamarra, Coker College, dciamarra@coker.edu


This presentation is a reflection of a trip that I led with 6 undergraduate education majors at Coker College. We want to share with you how policy, power, and politics are affecting the future of education in South Carolina, and the U.S.

Session T-404
Study Abroad or Grand Tour?: Pre-service Teachers’ Cross-Cultural Experiences Within Empire - CCP

Jubin Rahatzad, Purdue University, jrahatza@purdue.edu

Suniti Sharma, Saint Joseph's University, ssharma@sju.edu

Kadriye El-Atwani, Purdue University,, kelatwan@purdue.edu

Jason Ware, Purdue University, jaware@purdue.edu

JoAnn Phillion, Purdue University, phillion@purdue.edu

Erik Malewski, Kennesaw State, erik.l.malewski@gmail.com
U.S. pre-service teachers study abroad for the obtainment of experience from cultural others. This purpose is analyzed through a colonial perspective to understand the influence of superiority (inferiority) in formation of pre-service teachers’ views. Critical analysis of pre-service teachers study abroad experiences is necessary for the holistic cultivation of teachers.

A Reflection on the Planning and Implementation of A Service-Learning Course for International Volunteers

Shin-Jiann Gau, National Taiwan Normal University, jimgau@ntnu.edu.tw

Wen-Ling Lou, Aletheia University, aileen3638@hotmail.com
The study organized a practice model to reflect on the planning and implementation of a “service-learning: international volunteer” course and the outcomes of those Taiwanese volunteers worked in Mandarin schools in northern Thailand and southern Vietnam. Volunteers made great progress in cognitive abilities, affective awareness and professional competencies.
Session T-405
Negotiating the National Boundary: Japanese Youth in Schooling - CCP

Yuko Kawashima, University of Toronto, ychuandao@gmail.com


This presentation examines how the national boundary between Japan and the Other is produced at Japanese school, and how young people contextually experience the practices of these boundary works. Fieldwork was conducted in the drama classroom at a high school in Tokyo, employing feminist poststructural ethnography.

Contextualizing “Camelot”: Philosophy, Policy, Practice, and Progressive Education

Elinor A. Scheirer, University of North Florida, escheire@unf.edu


This paper examines progressive curriculum in one English middle school between 1980 and 2000 that inspired US educators and influenced Finnish educational reform. Supported by national policy and then challenged by it, the school’s experiences suggest that a “Camelot” of progressive practice exists only if philosophy, policy, and practice align.

A Peasant's Guide to Education Reform: Rhetoric and Ideology

Jeremy McClain, Georgia Southern, jm02549@georgiasouthern.edu


Schools are paradoxical spaces. They function both as protectorates of state power, but also sites of equality and opportunity. Although standards-based reform has threatened the potential of a child-centered curriculum, corporatist ideology threatens to eliminate the potential itself. This paper explores the hegemonic power of corporatist ideology as it drives educational reform.

Session T-406
Spanish or English? Language Politics/Policy in the Bilingual Teacher Preparation Classroom

Blanca Caldas, University of Texas at Austin, blanca.caldas75@gmail.com


This paper discusses how the conduction of bilingual teacher preparation mostly and/or unevenly in English may reinforce its high status in the classroom to the detriment of the development of academic Spanish of future bilingual teachers, which may affect their professional practice in the field.

Inclusion, philosophy, practice, and problems. A global view.

Brad Walkenhorst, Saint Louis University, bwalkenh@slu.edu


This presentation will look at inclusion practices around the globe through published research as well as current educational laws and mandates that effect the educational system. I will not only discuss the research but propose a solution to how we can ensure that every child matters, no child is left behind, and that we can effectively remove all barriers to learning and achieve education for all.
Session T-500 4:15pm-5:15pm

Session T-501
Mothering a Bodied Curriculum

Stephanie Springgay, University of Toronto, stephanie.springgay@utoronto.ca

Debra Freedman, University of Waterloo, dfreedma@uwaterloo.ca
This collection of essays considers how notions of embodiment and mothering are related to curriculum theory and practices in education. Advancing a new understanding of the maternal body, it argues for a ‘bodied curriculum’ that attends to the relational, social, and ethical implications of being-with other bodies differently, and to the different knowledges such bodily encounters produce.
Session T-502
Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia - CCP

David W. Kupferman, College of the Marshall Islands, dkupferman@gmail.com


This book deploys a Foucaultian lens to explore the circulations of power through formal schooling in the region known as Micronesia. Far from being a force for decolonization, this work considers the contemporary ways that American-style school have colonized the region and offers alternative discourses to benign meta-narratives of schooling.
Session T-503
Continuities and discontinuities: Turning points in our learning journey about Aboriginal perspectives

Will Letts, Charles Sturt University, wletts@csu.edu.au

Randa Khattar, Charles Sturt University, rkhattar@csu.edu.au

umar umangay, Charles Sturt University, uumangay@csu.edu.au


This paper provides insight into the complexities of a teacher education programme’s professional learning journey to enact curricula and pedagogies from perspectives of First Nations. We argue that the polyphonic nature of stakeholder voices provides both the challenges, but also the opportunities to work towards establishing responsive, robust practice.

Representing Aboriginal cultural diversity: A look inside the gallery - CCP

Annette Furo, University of Ottawa, afuro@uottawa.ca


Do representations of Aboriginal cultural diversity really represent Aboriginal cultural diversity? A semiotic analysis of a museum gallery in Canada asks educators to critically consider how the constructed nature of the museum space and the historical narratives presented reinforce or disrupt notions of Aboriginal cultures.
Session T-504
What do You Want to Know about Us?”: A Complex Loop of Relationship, Reflexivity, Responsibility, and Recursion in Narrative Inquiry

Jie Yu, Rollins College, jyu@rollins.edu


This paper challenges the traditional educational narrative method of “taking” stories from school teachers for the researchers’ own use and tries to establish a complex loop of relations, recursion, reflexivity and responsibility.

Developing the Researcher “Self”: How Does Reflexivity Shape the Identity of a Qualitative Researcher?

Leylja Emiraliyeva-Pitre, Louisiana State University, lemira1@tigers.lsu.edu , leylia.epitre@gmail.com


Conducting the first research as a graduate student is not easy. How should graduate students be taught to become qualitative researchers? Is there a step-by-step manual to guide us through the research process? This paper will examine the relationships between reflexivity and developing the researcher’s identity in narrative inquiry.
Session T-505
Portrait of Delta Express Program: A blue print for future post-disaster education program

Jolanta Smolen Santana, Louisiana State University, jsmole1@lsu.edu


Following Hurricane Katrina, multitude of organizations and programs entered Renaissance Village (RV), the largest FEMA trailer park. However, only Delta Express Program, an LSU College of Education initiative weathered the storm of biopolitics and biopower through the application of culturally relevant practices; consequently contributed to the development of a blue print for future programs.

Forging University-Public School Partnerships in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Paul T. Bole, University of New Orleans, pbole@uno.edu

Kenneth Farizo, University of New Orleans,
This presentation describes how several University of New Orleans, College of Education faculty utilized Learning Walks (Resnick, 1996) to create partnerships with area charter schools, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Conference participants will learn how those partnerships blossomed into opportunities/challenges that promoted school/student improvement and professional development for both entities.

Teach for America: Charity Education in Post Crisis situations - CCP

Prudence,Browne,UniversityofIllinoisatChicago,pbrown22@uic.edu

Jessica, Gottlieb, University of Illinois at Chicago, Jgottl3@uic.edu
Our research study will explore the impact of the actor’s ideology, in particular that of Teach For America, on education reform in New Orleans following the 2005 hurricane. The intersection of racial ideology while teaching black children and the prioritization of the neoliberal economic agenda all contribute to a Post-Crisis Education, a form of colonial dominance through a model of education that borrows from charity and charitable giving.
Doodles and Notes
Friday, 9 November 2012

Early Morning Sessions

7:30am-8:30am Don’t defend the self; lose the self: a sweaty workshop on karatedō and transformation – St Joseph’s Salon

7:30am-8:45am JCP Editorial Board Meeting breakfast – This is a closed business meeting of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy.



Art Exhibition

9:00am-5:15pm Subject2Change – CCP - Ballroom



All Day Session

9:00am-5:15pm The Thread of a Dream: Inviting Re-Attunement through a Nap-in – St. Ann’s Cottage 2



Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 2


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 4


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 6


Session F-100

9:00am-10:00am



Session F-101
Writing for the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy: A Conversation with Prospective Authors and Reviewers


Session F-102
What's in it for me?: African American adolescent males exploring identity and masculinity through young adult literature – CCP

Narrating from the Bottom of the Stairs: The Lived Experience of Minority Students at a Midwestern High School




Session F-103
PRAXIS vs. PRACTICE: Montessori Curriculum Countering Standards Based Design

The Early Development of Kindergarten in New Orleans (1860-1945) - CCP




Session F-104
Power, privilege and textbooks: a content analysis of General Studies textbooks in primary schools in Macao

Primary Teacher’s Characteristics and their effectiveness in the Teaching of Environmental Education in Cameroon

SJU Project Haiti: Learning and Growing Together



Session F-105
Evaluating Community outreach programs: Experiences from Makerere University, School of Industrial and Fine Arts’ stakeholders.

Community-Institution Partnerships: The Influence on Curriculum - CCP




Session F-106
Trauma/Imagination

Heteronormativity in the Texas Oil Patch: Practices, Policies, and Curriculum and its impact on Gay White students in the Texas Public School System.





Session F-107
A Search for an Alternative Curriculum and Pedagogy: The Case of the Village Institutes

Emancipatory Literacy: From Gramsci and Freire to Guthrie and Lead Belly






Friday, 9 November 2012
Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

St. Ann’s Cottage 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 6


Session F-200

10:15am-11:15am



Session F-201
The Language of Mathematics: Helping ELLs Make Sense of Mathematics

Session F-202
A Pedagogy of Love: Transcending the boundaries of technical teaching practices through the art of serving others


Session F-203
The Curriculum that Care Forgot


Session F-204
Nice White Lady? One teacher educator’s reflections on the creation of a disposition rubric.

Producing (White) Teachers: The Effects of Racelessness and Technical Rationality on Teacher Subjectivity – CCP

Promoting Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in tomorrow’s Educational Leaders: A Preliminary Ethnographic Study


Session F-205
The New Colonizers: Elementary Teacher (Mis)Education in Mandated Times

Building Capital During the Novice Years of Teaching Reading

Rainbow [Dis]Connection?: Perceptions on Pre-Service Teachers' Preparedness to Work with Minority Sexual and Gender Identity Students


Session F-206
Tracing the Inside from the Outside: A Look at Histories of Penal Literacy Practices

The politics of Arizona’s private for-profit prisons, criminalization of immigration, and their implications for education: A Foucauldian Analysis - CCP



Session F-207
Life experiences of an undocumented English language learner: From border crossing to scaling the brink of a dream.

Displacement on the border: A curriculum of violence, implications for practice



– CCP





Location

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 2


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 4


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 6


Ballroom

Table 7


Session F-300

11:30am-12:30pm



Session F-301
Michael's Story: A Portrait of Memories, Hopes, and Dreams

Using Fiction to Tell Unwanted Truths: Undocumented Immigrants in the USA

I Know You’re Black But What Am I? Disrupting the Static yet Arbitrary Notion of the Black Community - CCP


Session F-302
Lost in space: The dangers of critical reflection and transportation theory in autoethnographic research

Critical Methodology: The Possibilities of Narrative Inquiry and Autoethnography for Engaged Pedagogy




Session F-303
Rural LGB Youth: Privileging Marginalized Voices

Alone on Stage: How one GLBTIQ educator uses performance for social change - CCP




Session F-304
Who Do You Say I Am: Mary McLeod Bethune and Saint Katharine Drexel as Twentieth Century University Builders - CCP

Participation and Privilege in a Gender Studies Classroom




Session F-305
A responsibility to otherness: The possibility towards multicultural curriculum

Still Wandering: Jews, Social Justice, and Multicultural Thought




Session F-306

Our Lady of Guadalupe: The immaculate virgin as a site of public pedagogy - CCP

Model Minority or Perpetual Foreigner? The Images of Asian Americans Portrayed in U.S. History Textbooks - CCP


Session F-307
Unveiling the Cloak of Academic Patriarchy: Re-storying Who We Are and What We Do in Dep. of Teacher Education

_____________________

Developing African American Female Scholars: An Auto-ethnographic Reflection on a Critical Race Feminist Curriculum/Pedagogy - CCP

A Restorative Approach to Learning: Relational Theory as Feminist Pedagogy in Universitie





Friday, 9 November 2012
Town Hall/Lunch

12:45pm-2:45pm Town Hall/Lunch – Ballroom


Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

St. Ann’s Cottage 1

St. Mary’s Salon 2

Ballroom

Session F-400

3:00pm-4:00pm



Session F-401
Extending Autobiography into Life History and Narrative Research: Narratively Theorizing Identities

  • “True to Thee”: Understanding Place through Life History Research and Autobiography




  • El Otro Lado, Este Lado, and Epistemology In-between




  • What Are White Progressive Masculinities? Counter-Narrativized Identities of Committed White Male Teachers




Session F-402
The 2012 Hurricane that Hit K-12 and Higher Education in Louisiana

Session F-403
Advise Them to Not Become Teachers": (Re)Examining Our Role in Schools of Education in the Current Political Climate

Session F-404
Pageant Culture and Desire: Representations of Childhood in Pretty: The Series and Toddlers and Tiaras.

Session F-405
The Autonomy of the Art Complex in the Work of Emily Carr







St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 7


Session F-500

4:15pm-5:15pm



Session F-501
Engendering Curriculum History

Session F-502
Teaching Again

Session F-503
Emerging Fitness and Regulating Gender: A Historical Analysis of University Fitness Centers

Foucault, New Historicism, Masculinity

Sexual Orientation and Public Education: A Social Injustice Case Scenario


Session F-504
Experience Wanted: The Ontological Problem of Contemporary United States Education

Ontology, Experience, Critique

Teaching Machines: A History of Technology in the Classroom

Philosophical Media Literacy: A Bridge Between Philosophy & Information Environment




Session F-505
Seduced and Menaced by Our Own Knowledge: Theorizing the Historical Moment

New Orleans (de)Segregated: critical race theory examination of public schools - CCP



Session F-506
Forgotten Faces

Tattoos of a Mexican-U.S. Border region: Liberating Hidden Curriculum as Public Pedagogy to understand Power and Privilege - CCP





Friday, 9 November 2012
Early Morning Session 7:30am-8:30am

Don’t defend the self; lose the self: a sweaty workshop on karatedō and transformation

Doug Aoki, University of Alberta, aoki@ualberta.ca


This three-part workshop (held on Thursday, Friday, Saturday mornings of the conference) will be an intense introduction to karatedō designed to allow you to experience how its pedagogical significance stems from the opposite of self-defense. Participants should wear clothing that allows freedom of movement. No previous experience or specific level of conditioning required, but we will work hard.
Early Morning Session 7:30am-8:45am
JCP Editorial Board Meeting Breakfast
This is a closed business meeting of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. to discuss current and future business for the journal as well as any pending manuscripts under review. Co-Editors, ABER editor, Book and Media Review Editor, Assistant Editors, and all members of the Editorial Board are invited.
Art Exhibition 9:00am-5:15pm
Subject2Change - CCP

Crystal Leigh Endsley, Hamilton College, cendsley@hamilton.edu

Subject 2 Change is an interactive photograph exhibit that invites viewers to probe their conceptions about power and the racially ambiguous female body. This project explores the ways that gender and race are assigned, performed, and scribed on and by a subject.
All Day Session 9:00am-5:15pm
The Thread of a Dream: Inviting Re-Attunement through a Nap-in

Barbara Bickel, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, bickel.barbara@gmail.com

Medwyn McConachy, North Island College, mcconachy.medwyn@gmail.com
As artist/educator/activists we sew and weave moments of co-emergence-in-difference in our Nap-in processes. Through collective napping we re/articulate a co-poietic event-encounter, as essential for learning. This artworking encounter-event intersects being and doing, and stillness and action, offering a stopping place for self/other attunement and reflection in the midst of the conference environment.
Session F-100 9:00am-10:00am

Session F-101
Writing for the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy: A Conversation with Prospective Authors and Reviewers

B. Stephen Carpenter, II, The Pennsylvania State University, bsc5@psu.edu


Jenny A. Sandlin, Arizona State University, jennifer.sandlin@asu.edu
Morna McDermott, Towson State University, mmcdermott@towson.edu

Ju Chun Chen, Pennsylvania State University, jxc664@psu.edu

The co-editors and assistant editors will discuss effective methods for writing, submitting, re-submitting, and reviewing manuscripts for the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. This session will seek to demystify the process of manuscript submission, review, and publication and is intended for all prospective authors and reviewers of JCP.

Session F-102
What's in it for me?: African American adolescent males exploring identity and masculinity through young adult literature - CCP

Angelle Hebert, Nicholls State University, ahebe45@lsu.edu


In light of educational research that has often characterized African-American males as oppressed and victimized by institutional power systems, the presenter explores, via data collected in an ethnographic study with ten African-American high school males, methods through which African-American males discover spaces for empowerment and resistance through young adult literature selections. Qualitative data collected throughout an eight-week teaching unit include observations, interviews, and questionnaires, as well as personal experiences of the researcher. In light of research findings, the presenter suggests classroom applications and possibilities for change through a more culturally responsive pedagogy.

Narrating from the Bottom of the Stairs: The Lived Experience of Minority Students at a Midwestern High School

Boni Wozolek, Medina City Schools/Kent State University, bwozolek@kent.edu

This paper explores the results of a study where students of color at a predominantly Anglo, Midwestern high school have made a hidden curriculum explicit, named a null curriculum and, in response, independently formalized a community that enacted a curriculum that counters the hegemonic influence of the status quo.
Session F-103
PRAXIS vs. PRACTICE: Montessori Curriculum Countering Standards Based Design

Teresa Green, Mercer University, bteresagreen@gmail.com


PRAXIS vs. PRACTICE: Montessori Curriculum Countering Standards Based Design is an examination designed to compare the learning, preparation of content, and the environment of both the Montessori environment and the standards-based classroom environment. The comparison will discuss the key components of student centered learning, assessment, communication, and differentiated learning.

The Early Development of Kindergarten in New Orleans (1860-1945) - CCP

Shaofei Han, Louisiana State University, shan6@tigers.lsu.edu


This paper will focus on the tension between the local citizens in New Orleans who were deeply attached to the city’s feudal and elitist colonial traditions and the American Newcomers, and explore how kindergarten rooted in New Orleans.

Session F-104
Power, privilege and textbooks: a content analysis of General Studies textbooks in primary schools in Macao

Shieh, Jin-Jy, University of Macau, jjshieh@umac.mo


This paper aims to analyze the pictures in the textbook of Macao primary school General Studies to uncover the ideology that might conceal an unequal structure in gender, race and disability. The results suggest that negative bias towards diverse groups still exists in current textbooks and needs to be rectified.

Primary Teacher’s Characteristics and their effectiveness in the Teaching of Environmental Education in Cameroon

Efange Emilia Ngowo, University of Buea Cameroon, ngowoemi@yahoo.co.uk


This study examined primary teacher’s characteristics and their effectiveness in the teaching of environmental education in Cameroon. A descriptive survey design was used in the study. Data was collected from 381 Environmental Education Teachers. Data collected was analyzed using frequency counts, T-test of variance. The six hypotheses formulated will be tested at 0.05 level of significance.

SJU Project Haiti: Learning and Growing Together

Terrance L. Furin, Saint Joseph's University, tfurin@sju.edu


“SJU Project Haiti: Learning and Growing Together," is a Saint Joseph’s university-wide committee that grew after the 2010 earthquake because of a strong desire to improve Haitian education. In partnership with Haitian educators Saint Joseph’s professors are working to develop model pedagogies that engage students in hands-on, child-centered learning.
Session F-105
Evaluating Community outreach programs: Experiences from Makerere University, School of Industrial and Fine Arts’ stakeholders.

Ritah Edopu, Makerere University, rnedopu@gmail.com, ritah@sifa.mak.ac.ug

Makerere University has increasingly been investing in local and international community partnerships. However numerous questions about the implementation, progress, and relevance of these partnerships on University education have recently arisen. Adopting a Case Study design, this paper evaluates the significance of community outreach programs on visual arts higher education.

Community-Institution Partnerships: The Influence on Curriculum - CCP

Jerry M. Whitmore, Jr., Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College, jwhitmore@lsu.edu


Institutions are increasingly more focused on preparing students for a global society. Institutional locations provide opportunities to not only service the communities, but also encourage the intellectual growth of student through service learning projects, which are incorporated into curriculum.

Session F-106
Trauma/Imagination

Jake Burdick, Purdue University, burdics@purdue.edu

Debra Freedman, University of Waterloo, dfreedma@uwaterloo.ca
For Eisner, imagination is nothing short of “the engine of social and cultural progress” (2002, p. 25), a perspective that illuminates a connection between mindedness and the political – a link that is only hinted at within Eisner’s body of work. In this paper, we offer a conceptualization of imagination that, incorporating work on consciousness and subjectivity by Lacan (2002) and Kristeva (2002), attends to the necessary traumas of alterity and the unknown.

Heteronormativity in the Texas Oil Patch: Practices, Policies, and Curriculum and its impact on Gay White students in the Texas Public School System.

Michael Andrew Thorson Jr,. Texas A&M University, lonestarofdavid@tamu.edu


My study examines gay white former Texas public school students’ perceptions of heteronormativity within their schools and its possible impact on them. Furthermore, it seeks to suggest a pedagogical shift and alternative ethic to assist school leadership in Texas and beyond in creating a nurturing, positive environment for all students.
Session F-107
A Search for an Alternative Curriculum and Pedagogy: The Case of the Village Institutes

Nuran Aytemur Sagiroglu, Abant Izzet Baysal University, aytemur_n@ibu.edu.tr


This study examines curriculum and pedagogy implemented in the Village Institutes which, arising the “liberatory” potential of education, provide an important source for those who search for alternative curriculum and pedagogies.

Emancipatory Literacy: From Gramsci and Freire to Guthrie and Lead Belly

Carmen Scalfaro, Miami University, scalfac@muohio.edu


This presentation attempts to provide teachers with alternative modes of inspiration. Referencing emancipatory and critical theory through Antonio Gramsci and Paulo Freire this presentation explores the cultural media of musicians Woody Guthrie and Lead Belly, and the film School of Rock.
Session F-200 10:15am-11:15am

Session F-201
The Language of Mathematics: Helping ELLs Make Sense of Mathematics

Belinda P. Edwards, Kennesaw State University, bedwards@kennesaw.edu

Desha L. Williams, Kennesaw State University, dwill178@kennesaw.edu
Academic Language (AL) development involves making the language of mathematics explicit in order to expand students’ use of and control over mathematical language in a way that can increase their academic achievement in mathematics. Participants will examine the key mathematical words, symbols, and phrases students need to know and understand in order to make sense of mathematics.

Session F-202
A Pedagogy of Love: Transcending the boundaries of technical teaching practices through the art of serving others

Daniel Ciamarra, Coker College, dciamarra@coker.edu


This presentation is a reflection of a summer course I taught (The Pedagogy of Love) with 8 undergraduate students at Coker College. We want to share with you how the power of Agape Love can be used as a teaching tool transcend the status quo of teaching and learning.
Session F-203
The Curriculum that Care Forgot

Laura Jewett, University of Texas at Brownsville, laura.jewett@utb.edu

Jolanta Smolen, Independent Scholar, jsmole1@tigers.lsu.edu

Carol Plummer, University of Hawaii, Manoa, plummerc@hawaii.edu


Drawing from a triptych of qualitative studies conducted at a Katrina, FEMA trailer park, we examine a lived curriculum of disaster, characterized by displacement and solastalgia and what this might mean in terms of curriculum and the limits/possibilities of curriculum inquiry on the epistemological outskirts of research proper.
Session F-204
Nice White Lady? One teacher educator’s reflections on the creation of a disposition rubric.

Patricia L. Bullock, Kennesaw State University, pbulloc2@kennesaw.edu


The purpose of this paper is to explore reflections on my experiences – as a teacher educator within the department – of ‘observing’ the development process of a dispositions rubric within a Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education.

Producing (White) Teachers: The Effects of Racelessness and Technical Rationality on Teacher Subjectivity – CCP

Michael Cappello, University of Regina, michael.cappello@uregina.ca


How does whiteness shape curriculum/pedagogy in teacher education? This paper explores the constitution of white teacher subjects through a technical approach to teacher education in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. The paper analyzes the effects of both the assumption of racelessness and the adoption of technical rationality as the ‘core’ of teaching.

Promoting Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in tomorrow’s Educational Leaders: A Preliminary Ethnographic Study

Jennifer Martin, University of Mount Union, doctorjenmartin@gmail.com

Mandy Capel, University of Mount Union, capelml@mountunion.edu
This ethnographic study examines the journey of two university professors teaching in a new online hybrid Master of Educational Leadership program and their challenge to promote equitable schooling by fostering social justice principles and critical consciousness in a largely hegemonic student population.

Session F-205
The New Colonizers: Elementary Teacher (Mis)Education in Mandated Times

Lori T. Meier, East Tennessee State University, meier@etsu.edu


This paper will consider the complex challenges to current elementary undergraduate teacher education through the lens of recent (and intrusive) teacher education mandates at the higher education level and discuss the missing opportunities for faculty inclined towards critical pedagogy, curriculum studies, and foundations.

Building Capital During the Novice Years of Teaching Reading

Patricia Durham, Sam Houston State University, Patricia.durham71@gmail.com, pmd006@shsu.edu


This paper opens conversations to discuss the way five teachers used their lived-experiences to construct pedagogical ownership and identity. It offers opportunity to compare historical moments of pedagogical development as well as the need to re-articulate its direction to meet the needs of future educators.

Rainbow [Dis]Connection?: Perceptions on Pre-Service Teachers' Preparedness to Work with Minority Sexual and Gender Identity Students

Reagan J. Kaufman, University of Wyoming, reagan@uwyo.edu


In an effort to understand the current level of MSGI inclusion in one teacher preparation program, the author utilized a mix-method study to explore pre-service teacher preparedness to work with MSGI students through multiple perspectives. Despite resistance to the research, the initial data suggest an overall lack of factual knowledge about MSGI students, on both the part of teacher educators and pre-service teachers.
Session F-206
Tracing the Inside from the Outside: A Look at Histories of Penal Literacy Practices

Melinda A. Hollis, Arizona State University, mahollis@asu.edu


History is bound by expectations, ways of reading, and ways of knowing. The act of "doing" pedagogical history follows expected and unexpected conventions. Histories are often disseminated and upheld as “the way we were” and serve to suggest something about the ways that we have changed. From amid the fog of contemporary approaches to carceral education, this presentation explores some of the histories of educational programs and practices established in institutions that incarcerate human minds and bodies. It questions how we understand the function of pedagogy by looking through the past as it is historicized in the present.

The politics of Arizona’s private for-profit prisons, criminalization of immigration, and their implications for education: A Foucauldian Analysis - CCP

Suniti Sharma, Saint Joseph's University, ssharma@sju.edu


Using Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), this paper is a Foucauldian analysis of three interconnected issues: the growth in private for-profit prisons, state sanctioned criminalization of immigration, mass incarceration of Latino/a undocumented non-citizens, and the implications of these policy shifts for education as a democratic practice in a multiracial and multicultural civil society.
Session F-207
Life experiences of an undocumented English language learner: From border crossing to scaling the brink of a dream.

Ludovic A. Sourdot, Texas Woman’s University, lsourdot@twu.edu

Holly Hansen-Thomas, Texas Woman’s University, HHansenThomas@twu.edu
This presentation will report on a case study that highlights the life experience and challenges faced by an undocumented college student and English Language Learner.

Displacement on the border: A curriculum of violence, implications for practice – CCP

Luz Zuniga, University of Texas at Brownsville, lezuniga@bisd.us


This paper uses autobiographical narrative to explore the curriculum of U.S.-Mexico border violence. With current power struggles and violence occurring in Mexico, how do involuntary immigrant students adapt to a culture of privilege? How can teachers create a classroom environment that is conducive to learning despite different pedagogical and curricular structures?
Session F-300 11:30am-12:30am

Session F-301
Michael's Story: A Portrait of Memories, Hopes, and Dreams

Marianne Fry, Louisiana State University, mfry3@lsu.edu


This paper presents a portrait of a young man who spent two years in a juvenile prison. Narrative poetry is incorporated to tell his story. Giving voice to the seldom heard marginalized adolescent/juvenile delinquent population is the overall goal, with an additional endeavor of promoting social awareness and empathetic concern.

Using Fiction to Tell Unwanted Truths: Undocumented Immigrants in the USA

Miryam Espinosa-Dulanto, Valdosta State University, meespinosadulant@valdosta.edu"

Sandra Rodriguez-Arroyo, University of Nebraska at Omaha, srodriguezarroy@unomaha.edu"
Poetic Narrative that emerges out of a larger research project centered on the lives of immigrants allows the stories to weave the familiar and the extraordinary of a life. These poems are brushstrokes of dreams, hopes, violence, and danger associated with the Mexican/USA border. They breathe and grow in the dreams of the people in both nations. As qualitative researchers and educators, we believe that giving a humane face to the numeric data helps increasing awareness about power and privilege and highlights intersections of gender, ethnicity, socio economic and immigration status. It gives the opportunity to understand that self and Other are intertwined and that it is not possible for one to survive without the other.

I Know You’re Black But What Am I? Disrupting the Static yet Arbitrary Notion of the Black Community - CCP

Chelda Smith, University of Minnesota, smit5881@umn.edu


This essay problematizes notions of a monolithic Black community. Additionally, it seeks to theoretically understand the role of social capital in reference to raced-based community border patrollers. I intend to analyze the construction of racial identities and their legitimacy as measured by cultural insiders, outsiders, and floaters.

Session F-302
Lost in space: The dangers of critical reflection and transportation theory in autoethnographic research

David, Humpal, Texas A&M University, dhumpal@tamu.edu


This paper presentation focuses on the complications and dangers of utilizing qualitative research methods while suffering from symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Autoethnographies position the researcher as observer/narrator who uses introspection and self-analysis while immersed into a community context. The teacher/researcher shares ramifications MDD poses for qualitative researchers.

Critical Methodology: The Possibilities of Narrative Inquiry and Autoethnography for Engaged Pedagogy

Sara Carrigan Wooten, Louisiana State University, sara.wooten@gmail.com


This paper explores a cooperative relationship between narrative inquiry and critical autoethnography in the pursuit of a reimagined multicultural education classroom. The central question of this project centers on how to displace dominant positionalities that reject and rebrand threatening discourses, redefining the Other in ways that silence resistance.
Session F-303
Rural LGB Youth: Privileging Marginalized Voices

Allison K. Kootsikas, Penn State University, akk151@psu.edu

Elizabeth A. Mellin, Penn State University, eam20@psu.edu

Jillian B. Blum, Penn State University, jbb2551@psu.edu

Pia Smal, Penn State University, pss165@psu.edu

Carly Scarton, Penn State University, carlyscarton@gmail.com


Existing research has identified rural school communities as the most unsafe for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual (LGB) adolescents, however few studies have investigated their experiences. Photovoice is one way to empower this marginalized population, allowing them to express their experiences while expanding upon their community base and support system in the process.

Alone on Stage: How one GLBTIQ educator uses performance for social change - CCP

J. Scott Baker, Texas A & M University, joseph.baker@cfisd.net


One secondary educator utilizes a poetry performance to address the complexities of the GLBTIQ teachers who work in secondary schools. The author, an openly gay teacher, addresses the frustrations, fears, and experiences of what it’s like to have students today know their teacher is queer.
Session F-304
Who Do You Say I Am: Mary McLeod Bethune and Saint Katharine Drexel as Twentieth Century University Builders - CCP

Roland Mitchell, Louisiana State University, rwmitch@lsu.edu

Berlisha Morton, Louisiana State University, bricar3@lsu.edu
In this presentation, we acknowledge Mary McLeod Bethune and Saint Katharine Drexel as university builders. During an era that placed constrictions on Black education, these women had to be more than just religious missionaries and civil rights activists to create unique and lasting approaches to higher education and vocational outreach.

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