Curriculum & Pedagogy Program Committee Report 2012 Co-Chairs: Debra Freedman and Erik Malewski Committee Members



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Session W-205
Educating Incapacity: A Dramatistic Analysis and Critique of School Voucher Rhetoric - CCP

Jason A. Ware, Purdue University, jaware@purdue.edu

Jamel Miller, Purdue University, mille943@purdue.edu
Focusing on the rhetoric around failing and “successful” schools, the difference between the two, and school vouchers as choice providers, from a critical race theory perspective, this proposed session will analyze and critique school voucher rhetoric and what it purports to do within U.S. school systems.

Rationalizing Standards, Rationing Opportunities: Neoliberalism and the Paradox of Success in Haitian and U.S. Education

Baudelaire Ulysse, National-Louis University, boddie.makarios@gmail.com


Inherent in the notion of free market is the view of limited government. This view maintains the government should be involved as minimally, allowing the market to self-regulate. This free market philosophy belongs to a broader economic agenda of neoliberalism, which infuses and drives educational reforms locally and globally.
Session W-206
Paolo Freire, bell hooks, and Tupac Shakur?: Examining Critical/Engaged Pedagogy Using a Hip-Hop Worldview - CCP

Kevin Joseph, Louisiana State University, kjose22@lsu.edu


Drawing on the theories, ideologies, and words of scholars Paulo Freire and bell hooks and hip-hop icon Tupac Shakur, this paper explores the impact of educational practitioners utilizing a critical/engaged pedagogical approach—while maintaining knowledge of the hip-hop worldview that their students may possess.

Multicultural teacher education courses are not designed to prepare all pre-service teachers for diversity: Experiences of an African American pre-service teacher - CCP

Michael Takafor Ndemanu, University of Southern Indiana, mtndemanu@usi.edu


This study explores the ways in which an African American male pre-service teacher (PST) interpret and come to understand a variety of issues related to human diversity in education upon taking a multicultural education course, entitled Education for a Pluralistic Society (EPS), at a large Midwestern university.

Session W-207
From my cold heart to my clear head”: Anzia Yezierska’s lessons for John Dewey - CCP

Jennie Stearns, Georgia Gwinnett College, jstearns@ggc.edu


Both through her fiction and lived experiences, Anzia Yezierska provides an important critique of Dewey, with whom she had a romantic affair. After tracing these connections, I conclude with discussion of assignments using Yezierska’s fiction to encourage first-year students to discuss issues such as immigration, whiteness, consumerism, and the challenges faced by non-traditional students.

Imagery and Dialogue in Black Visual Culture and Black Vernacular: A Theoretical Examination - CCP

Alphonso Grant, Penn State University, AlphonsoGrant@aol.com


This paper explores the discourse of Black visual culture and Black vernacular through concepts, theories, and critical issues relevant to curriculum studies. The paper culminates with a theoretical examination of stereotypes and perceptions in these arenas in America through the critical lens of W.E.B. DuBois’ (1903) concept of double consciousness.
Thursday, 8 November 2012
Early Morning Session

7:30am-8:30am Don’t defend the self; lose the self: a sweaty workshop on karatedō and transformation – St Joseph’s Salon


Art Exhibition

9:00am-5:15pm Subject2Change – CCP - Ballroom


All Day Session

9:00am-5:15pm The Thread of a Dream: Inviting Re-Attunement through a Nap-in – St. Ann’s Cottage 2


Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 4


Session T-100

9:00am-10:00am



Session T-101
Prelude to a Storm: The less told stor(ies) of New Orleans Public Schools pre-2005.
(this presentation spans T-100 and T-200)


Session T-102
What is at Stake for k-12, Higher Education, and the Curriculum and Pedagogy Group in this Era of High Stakes Reform?
(this presentation spans T-100 and T-200)


Session T-103
Within the garden: An in-between space of togetherness and dis/location
A Dusty Basket, A Nun, and A Curriculum: Revisioning the Foundational Curriculum of Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana – CCP
The Black Church as a Curriculum of Place: Implications for Epistemology, Ontology, and Knowledge Production – CCP


Session T-104
Curricular points of departure and hopeful destinations for (social studies) education

A Curriculum of Border Violence, and the Loss of Place, Loss of Self – CCP

For the Sake of Diplomacy: The Educational (im)Possibility of Teaching Peace by New York City Elementary School Teachers






Location

St. Ann’s Cottage 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Session T-200

10:15am-11:15am



Session T-201
But Seriously, A Pedagogy of Colbert

Session T-202
Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Social Justice in Adult Remedial Education

Past lives, present understandings, and imagined futures: Intersections of identity, experience, and place – CCP





Thursday, 8 November 2012
Sessions

Location

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 2


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 4


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 6


Session T-300

11:30am-12:30am



Session T-301
Christianity as Post-colonial Resistance?: Black Liberation Theology, The Black Church, Womanist Theology as Sites for Pedagogical Decolonization - CCP
How explicit and implicit curriculum approaches increased religious intolerance and social class differences in Pakistani Society?
Teaching structures and perceived classroom power relations that impact the use of cultural interpretation CCP


Session T-302
Developing curriculum that will challenge hegemonic practices based on privilege - CCP

Inquiry, civic engagement, and projects of possibility: A new educational science that honors reflective practices critical to our public actions.

Eighth graders opinions on diversity within the science classroom


Session T-303
The Common Core Standards Initiative: Implications for Marginalized Students’ Success

Race…To…Common Core: Investigating the Common Core Standards with regards to race in Southern Louisiana - CCP



Session T-304
On Mechanisms, Meaning, and the Monstrous: A Review of Process in Public Pedagogy Literature

Public pedagogy, critical pedagogy, posthumanism

A Posthuman Curriculum: A Response to Hyperreal Panopticism

Unsilencing voices: A study of zoo signs and their language of authority



Session T-305
Developing critical agency in times of ideological deceptions: Towards a Nepantlera Pedagogy - CCP

Subtractive Curriculum: A Critical Look at the STAAR Test

Impact of the “Extra” on Pre-service Teachers Dispositions


Session T-306
The Lost Carpetbagger: Complicating place in the South for a northern-born white teacher

Living in a literary desert? History of Education in the South Reconsidered




Town Hall/Lunch

12:45pm-2:45pm Town Hall/Lunch – Ballroom


Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

St. Ann’s Cottage 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 6


Session T-400

3:00pm-4:00pm



Session T-401
Recovering Curriculum History In Intercultural and Cosmopolitan Contexts:

Reconstructing Intellectual History



Session T-402
How many adjectives do you need? The complexity of identity (re)(de)construction.

- CCP


Session T-403
Bringing learning to life: Engaging pre-service teachers in the political and practical realms of education

Session T-404
Study Abroad or Grand Tour?: Pre-service Teachers’ Cross-Cultural Experiences Within Empire - CCP

A Reflection on the Planning and Implementation of A Service-Learning Course for International Volunteers



Session T-405
Negotiating the National Boundary: Japanese Youth in Schooling - CCP

Contextualizing “Camelot”: Philosophy, Policy, Practice, and Progressive Education

A Peasant's Guide to Education Reform: Rhetoric and Ideology


Session T-406
Spanish or English? Language Politics/Policy in the Bilingual Teacher Preparation Classroom

Inclusion, philosophy, practice, and problems. A global view.





Thursday, 8 November 2012
Sessions

Location

St Joseph’s Salon

St. Mary’s Salon 1

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 6


Session T-500

4:15pm-5:15pm




Session T-501
Mothering a Bodied Curriculum

Session T-502
Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia - CCP

Session T-503
Continuities and discontinuities: Turning points in our learning journey about Aboriginal perspectives

Representing Aboriginal cultural diversity: A look inside the gallery - CCP




Session T-504
“What do You Want to Know about Us?”: A Complex Loop of Relationship, Reflexivity, Responsibility, and Recursion in Narrative Inquiry

Developing the Researcher “Self”: How Does Reflexivity Shape the Identity of a Qualitative Researcher?




Session T-505
Portrait of Delta Express Program: A blue print for future post-disaster education program

Forging University-Public School Partnerships in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Teach for America: Charity Education in Post Crisis situations – CCP



Thursday, 8 November 2012
Early Morning Session 7:30am-8:30am
Don’t defend the self; lose the self: a sweaty workshop on karatedō and transformation

Doug Aoki, University of Alberta, aoki@ualberta.ca


This three-part workshop (held on Thursday, Friday, Saturday mornings of the conference) will be an intense introduction to karatedō designed to allow you to experience how its pedagogical significance stems from the opposite of self-defense. Participants should wear clothing that allows freedom of movement. No previous experience or specific level of conditioning required, but we will work hard.
Art Exhibition 9:00am-5:15pm
Subject2Change - CCP

Crystal Leigh Endsley, Hamilton College, cendsley@hamilton.edu

Subject 2 Change is an interactive photograph exhibit that invites viewers to probe their conceptions about power and the racially ambiguous female body. This project explores the ways that gender and race are assigned, performed, and scribed on and by a subject.
All Day Session 9:00am-5:15pm
The Thread of a Dream: Inviting Re-Attunement through a Nap-in

Barbara Bickel, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, bickel.barbara@gmail.com

Medwyn McConachy, North Island College, mcconachy.medwyn@gmail.com
As artist/educator/activists we sew and weave moments of co-emergence-in-difference in our Nap-in processes. Through collective napping we re/articulate a co-poietic event-encounter, as essential for learning. This artworking encounter-event intersects being and doing, and stillness and action, offering a stopping place for self/other attunement and reflection in the midst of the conference environment.
Session T-100 9:00am-10:00am

Session T-101
Prelude to a Storm: The less told stor(ies) of New Orleans Public Schools pre-2005.

Dawn LaFargue, Pennsylvania State University, dll203@psu.edu

Brian Beabout, University of New Orleans, bbeabout@uno.edu
Post Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ public schools are functioning under an aggressive reform effort, choice. Pre-storm educators feel that their work has been dismissed and replaced by younger, non-native educators. Public debate remains a relatively binary pro-charter/anti-charter affair. This forum exists to offer an open critique of schooling in both pre- and post-Katrina New Orleans. (This presentation spans T-100 and T-200)

Session T-102
What is at Stake for k-12, Higher Education, and the Curriculum and Pedagogy Group in this Era of High Stakes Reform?

Morna McDermott, Towson University, mmcdermott@towson.edu

Cole Reilly, Towson University, creilly@towson.edu

Jennifer Job, UNC-Chapel Hill, jgjob@email.unc.edu

Barbara Madeloni, University of Massachusetts Amherst, bmadeloni@gmail.com

Shaun Johnson, Towson University, spjohnson@towson.edu

Tim Slekar, Penn State University-Altoona, TDS12@psu.edu
While many individual members of the Curriculum and Pedagogy group represent real stakeholders on k-12 educational reform: parents, teachers, students and community members, a large cadre of our membership are teachers at institutions of higher learning as well. The gradual take over of public schools into the hands of for profit private industries has escalated rapidly and has now made its way into colleges of education via the National Common Core Standards (NCSS), Teachers Professional Assessment (TPA), the increased use of k-12 student test scores to evaluate student teacher performance, and the buyout of public universities into the hands of private companies. This panel aims to share individual experiences of panelists and then engage in a large group discussion about the role(s) that C and P should take as a group in shaping activist oriented public pedagogies. (This presentation spans T-100 and T-200)


  • How do we design curricula and implement pedagogies that reveal systemic inequities, avoid student and teacher despair, and move toward activism?

  • How do we, as activists, as curriculum workers, teach thoughtfully in an era of standardization and high stakes testing?

  • How does the intersection of university, school, and community (or the collaboration of parents, teachers, students and professors) promote/influence equitable schooling?


Session T-103
Within the garden: An in-between space of togetherness and dis/location

Nikki Rotas, University of Toronto, nikki.rotas@mail.utoronto.ca


This paper examines the places of our everyday as pedagogical places of learning where bodies (human and non-human) engage in relational processes that alter knowledges about self, other, and place. Undergoing a self-study using the method of currere, I examine my own learning as embodied and relational in the context of my mother’s garden. Through journal writing, I reflect upon the experiential learning process, analyze issues and concepts related to the body-in-movement, as well as re-imagine the garden as a site of learning for students (i.e., a pedagogical and curricular space of togetherness and dis/location).

A Dusty Basket, A Nun, and A Curriculum: Revisioning the Foundational Curriculum of Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana - CCP

Berlisha Morton, Louisiana State University, bricar3@lsu.edu


This presentation tells the story of the curriculum that would become the foundation for Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana. This story about a nun and a dusty discarded basket will challenge determinations of educational activism and explore the intersections of race, gender, and religion in higher education.

The Black Church as a Curriculum of Place: Implications for Epistemology, Ontology, and Knowledge Production - CCP

Kirsten T. Edwards, The University of Oklahoma, Kirsten.T.Edwards@ou.edu


This paper identifies specific practices and ideals germane to The Black Church experience. Through the culmination of these practices and ideals specifically produced within and in response to multiple systems of power, privilege, and supremacy, the author posits that The Black Church has evolved into a specific “Curriculum of Place.
Session T-104
Curricular points of departure and hopeful destinations for (social studies) education

Kent den Heyer, University of Alberta, kdenheye@ualberta.ca


This presentation extends Henderson and Gornik’s (2007) application of Kuhn’s (1962) notion of paradigms to examine four compelling orientations to history/social studies curriculum. I argue that the final paradigm of 'curriculum wisdom as a disciplined ethic of truths' most importantly combines curriculum theory and disciplinary insights around a call for a more affirmative ontological premise for our work in and as education.

A Curriculum of Border Violence, and the Loss of Place, Loss of Self - CCP

Edith Trevino, University of Texas at Browsville, edith.trevino@hotmail.com


Through autoethnography, I will reflect on my experiences of border violence and what these social and cultural experiences might mean to a curriculum of place as well as to a larger curricular issues that affect immigrant and displaced students.

For the Sake of Diplomacy: The Educational (im)Possibility of Teaching Peace by New York City Elementary School Teachers

Debbie Sonu, Hunter College, City University of New York, debbie.sonu@gmail.com

Molly Quinn, Teachers College, Columbia University, mollyequinn@gmail.com
This presentation on educating for peace draws from a multi-site qualitative study in New York City elementary classrooms and considers what kinds of togetherness are possible, who dictates the agenda, and who is considered a subject deserved of peace? It describes four models and uses philosophy to push new frontiers.
Session T-200 10:15am-11:15am

Session T-201
But Seriously, A Pedagogy of Colbert

Samuel Jaye Tanner, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, tann0035@umn.edu

Shannon Dahmes, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, dahme014@umn.ed
But seriously, this workshop is a multimodal inquiry into the efficiency of a Pedagogy of Colbert. Multimodal means the inclusion of a short performance, and collaborative and theatrical inquiry that leads into a reflection and discussion. The Pedagogy of Colbert (might) mean the ironic performance of actual content as an efficient means of critical pedagogy and transaction in schools.
Session T-202
Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Social Justice in Adult Remedial Education

Elinor A. Scheirer, University of North Florida, escheire@unf.edu

Lance J. Baxter, Daytona State College, baxterl@daytonastate.edu
This paper describes a qualitative research study focusing on how instructors perceived the complexities of adult learning and remediation. Their vivid, personal accounts of students’ struggles and accomplishments offer knowledge and insight into their professional practice, pedagogical influences, mission for social justice, and self-efficacy.

Past lives, present understandings, and imagined futures: Intersections of identity, experience, and place - CCP

Jessica Exkano, Louisiana State University, Jexkan1@tigers.lsu.edu


This narrative inquiry explores the intersections of identity, experience, and place, while drawing upon a Deweyian notion of experience and Bourdieu’s notion of capital, to document the experiences of “at-risk” students in a college access program. Of special interest are how identities merge, collide, and emerge and curricular possibilities.
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