Curriculum & Pedagogy Program Committee Report 2012 Co-Chairs: Debra Freedman and Erik Malewski Committee Members



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UNIQUE CONFERENCE FEATURES
Colouring Curriculum and Pedagogy

Sessions denoted with a CCP are sessions proposed to and accepted by the Browning Caucus for the Colouring Curriculum and Pedagogy designation. We invite your participation and contemplation as we complicate the borders, dialogues, and understandings of curriculum and pedagogy.


Town Hall Meetings

On Thursday our Town Hall will focus on the business of the Curriculum and Pedagogy Group. As part of your registration for this conference, you officially become a member. We invite all members to attend this meeting and engage in open and participatory dialogue related to the overall the vision and governance.


On Friday our Town Hall is dedicated to a discussion of power, privilege, and supremacy, one that builds upon a discussion that began last year in response to a question on the next steps for the Browning Caucus. The Caucus began three years ago as an avenue to develop a “set of strategies and priorities for fomenting the proliferation of multiple approaches to critical race/anti-racist, postcolonial/anti-colonial, decolonizing, and indigenous scholarship in curriculum studies.” This Town Hall will explore how we, as a field, and organization/conference, and a journal address issues of power, privilege, and supremacy as they manifest themselves in our work.
Registration Table
The registration table is located in the Bourbon Orleans Lobby at the foot of the stairs to the ballroom and will be open during the following times:
Wednesday, 7 November 2012 3:00pm – 7:00pm

Thursday, 8 November 2012 8:30am – 1:00pm; 3:00pm-4:30pm

Friday, 9 November 2012 8:30am – 1:00pm; 3:00pm-4:30pm

Saturday, 10 November 2012 8:30am – 10:00am



MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
Curriculum and Pedagogy is committed to democratic, transparent governance. Council members, who may be full-time practitioners, college professors and/or graduate students, serve three-year terms. The Council is elected by the membership at the annual conference. The Council establishes procedures and guidelines for conducting its business consistent with the philosophy of the organization. Any policy and procedure is subject to review and revision, however, by the membership at the Annual Meeting. As an elected body of the whole, Council is the sole and final decision-making body of this organization.
C&P Governing Council 2012:

Chair, 2011

Jim Kilbane


Chair-Elect, 2013

kris sloan




Program

Debra Freedman (Co-Chair)

Erik Malewski (Co-Chair)

Miryam Espinosa-Dulanto

Laura Rychly

Will Letts

Zahra Murad


Finance/ Fundraising

James Jupp (Treasurer)

Laura Jewett (Registrar)

Jubin Rahatzad




Membership/ Communication

Cole Reilly (Chair)

Allison Kootsikas

Antonio Garcia

Jennie Stearns


Nominations

Jennie Stearns (Chair)

Miryam Espinosa-Dulanto

Sean Fretwell



Secretary-Legal/Archives

Allison Kootsikas (Secretary)

Laura Jewett

Laura Rychly



Publications

Morna M. McDermott (Chair)

James Jupp

Bridget Bunten

Jubin Rahatzad


Fellowship and Awards (includes Graduate Support)

Will Letts (Co-Chair)

Antonio Garcia (Co-Chair)

Deb Freedman

Zahra Murad

Bridget Bunten



Site

Erik Malewski (Co-Chair)

Jim Kilbane (Co-Chair)

Morna McDermott

Cole Reilly

Sean Fretwell



For more information about any of the committees, please visit our recently re-designed website at www.curriculumandpedagogy.org


Elections

During this year’s conference, we will hold Council Elections to elect new members who will replace those rotating off Governing Council this year. All C&P conference participants are encouraged to consider nominating themselves or others. Council members participate in the overall governance and share the workload of the Curriculum & Pedagogy Group. Council seats extend for three years, beginning in the calendar year that follows election to the council. Council members are expected to attend the annual conference each year. Additionally, members meet twice in person during the Annual Conference and converse regularly via WIKI throughout the year. All nominations are due by 8:00am on Friday. Candidates for Council positions will introduce themselves at the Thursday Town Hall meeting.


Edited Collection

The Curriculum and Pedagogy (C&P) group invites members to present proposals concerning the creation of an editing team. The purpose of this editing team is to solicit manuscripts, for the annual edited collection (published in partnership with Information Age Press), based on papers delivered at the 13th Annual Curriculum and Pedagogy conference in New Orleans (November 7-10, 2012). The editing team will be responsible for conceptualizing the collection’s theme, organizing the manuscript, and reviewing/editing solicited manuscripts for the purpose of publication. Please see Morna McDermott, publications chair, if you are interested in being a part of the editing team.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Curriculum and Pedagogy Council and Members would like to thank the following for their commitment to supporting our Conference:


  • Tulane University Teacher Preparation and Certification Program for providing the technology in our sessions and constant support to Jim Kilbane in coordinating details for the conference

  • University of New Orleans School of Education for also providing the technology in our sessions

  • Erik Malewski and Kennesaw State University, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, for printing the programs

  • Susan Mack and Megan Emboulis from the Bourbon Orleans Hotel for their assistance with the conference details and for never failing to quickly respond to questions and minor “crises”

  • Marcia Fraser from Four Points by Sheraton for her willingness to offer us additional rooms quickly and reasonably

  • Miryam Espinosa-Dulanto, Sandra Rodriguez-Arroyo and Nancy Vicente for their time, effort and vision in guiding the development of the graffiti wall from just a kernel of an idea

  • Allison Huie, our webmaster, and Mark Stewart, our web designer, for keeping the conference pages updated

  • The community partners who were willing to take a chance on developing fruitful connections with us

  • The hotel staff of the Bourbon Orleans, Four Points, and surrounding hotels where we stay

In addition, the Curriculum and Pedagogy Council and Members would like to thank publishers and individuals who donated books for sale at our book table. Proceeds from the book sale support graduate student attendance at the conference.


Conference Session Information
All presentations offer outstanding spaces for informal and conversational exchange. Every attempt has been made to group a variety of scholars together when possible – faculty, graduate students and public school practitioners – with related papers, presentations and performances. We hope you’ll find this enriching to your presentation and conference experience.
Presenters are asked to consult with one another at the start of each session to determine order of presentations, amount of time to allocate to each author and the format for follow-up discussion or Q & A. All papers and performances should be allotted equitable time for presentation and additional minutes for questions and discussion, depending on how many papers are scheduled for that session. Ordinarily, we assume that the first paper listed in the session will be presented first, although presenters may alter this arrangement if they see a need.



Wednesday, 7 November 2012
Pre-Conference Meetings

2:00pm-3:30pm Council Meeting – St. Ann’s Cottage 1

3:30pm-5:00pm Mentoring - St. Mary’s Salon 1


Art Exhibition

4:00pm-8:00pm Subject2Change – CCP - Ballroom


Sessions

Location

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 2


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 4


St. Mary’s Salon 2

Session W-100

4:00pm-5:00pm



Session W-101
Decolonizing English teaching in Puerto Rico - CCP

Theory and Culture: Using decolonial perspective for theory building - CCP




Session W-102
The Curriculum of Moral Education in Globalized and Multicultural World: The Case of Japan

Teaching English as a Glocalized Language in a Globalized World




Session W-103
Is this Real?: Teaching with Tony Danza

Troubling the “Good Teacher”: Curriculum, Reflective Practice and the Epistemology of Mastery



Session W-104
Sustainable Pedagogy in an Audit Culture: Toward a Collaborative Method of Inquiry
Zine Conversations: Affirmations, Interventions, and Access

Going to the dark side?: The first weeks and months of a curriculum scholar working as a chief diversity officer




Session W-105
Post-Plastic Parenting




Location

Ballroom

Table 1


Ballroom

Table 2


Ballroom

Table 3


Ballroom

Table 4


Ballroom

Table 5


Ballroom

Table 6


Ballroom

Table 7


Session W-200

5:15pm-6:15pm



Session W-201
Language and literacy instruction enacting the possibilities for "thirdspace" pedagogies in elementary classrooms

Wolfgang Iser meets the Common Core: A hermeneutic appraisal of a watershed moment in national reading policy




Session W-202
DIY Art Education: Learning in the digital communities of gamers and makers - CCP

Educating for Democracy: Ethical, Empowered Social Entrepreneurship for Kids




Session W-203
Introducing Karaoke as a Pedagogical Instrument in the 21st Century Classroom

From Cause to Fiction - Writing for Social Justice - CCP




Session W-204
Creole Curriculum: A New Orleans Education through Food

This is a Paper About Food. And Farming.




Session W-205
Educating Incapacity: A Dramatistic Analysis and Critique of School Voucher Rhetoric - CCP

Rationalizing Standards, Rationing Opportunities: Neoliberalism and the Paradox of Success in Haitian and U.S. Education



Session W-206
Paolo Freire, bell hooks, and Tupac Shakur?: Examining Critical/Engaged Pedagogy Using a Hip-Hop Worldview - CCP

Multicultural teacher education courses are not designed to prepare all pre-service teachers for diversity: Experiences of an African American pre-service teacher – CCP




Session W-207
“From my cold heart to my clear head”: Anzia Yezierska’s lessons for John Dewey - CCP

Imagery and Dialogue in Black Visual Culture and Black Vernacular: A Theoretical Examination - CCP




Reception

6:30pm-8:00pm Welcome Reception - Ballroom


Wednesday, 7 November 2012
Art Exhibition 4:00pm-8:00pm
Subject2Change - CCP

Crystal Leigh Endsley, Hamilton College, cendsley@hamilton.edu

Subject 2 Change is an interactive photograph exhibit that invites viewers to probe their conceptions about power and the racially ambiguous female body. This project explores the ways that gender and race are assigned, performed, and scribed on and by a subject.
Session W-100 4:00pm-5:00pm

Session W-101
Decolonizing English teaching in Puerto Rico

Nancy Vanessa Vicente, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, nancyv.vicente@upr.edu nanvan68@gmail.com


This presentation will explore how a Puerto Rican English teacher uses performance as a teaching tool to explore the impact that colonization has had on her and her students in order to empower herself and her English as a Second Language students.

Theory and Culture: Using decolonial perspective for theory building

Freyca Calderon-Berumen, Texas Christian University, f.calderonberumen@tcu.edu

Teresa P. Stephenson, Texas Christian University, t.a.powers@tcu.edu
Colonial ideology present in theory building in education perpetuates dominant discourse. We argue that through interpretative narratives people from marginalized communities may participate in theory building by implementing decolonizing methodologies. We focus our analysis in Native Americans and Latinos/Chicanos searching evidence for the development of decolonial ideology in education.
Session W-102
The Curriculum of Moral Education in Globalized and Multicultural World: The Case of Japan

Kaori Shimizu, Louisiana State University, kshimi1@lsu.edu


Moral education has been included in school curriculum in Japan since its modern school system was established in 1872. This paper considers whether recent emphasis on patriotism, Japanese tradition, and culture in moral education adequately prepares children to live in the increasingly globalized world, where diverse cultures coexist side-by-side.

Teaching English as a Glocalized Language in a Globalized World

Jesse Goodman, Indiana University, goodmanj@indiana.edu

Gulistan Gursel, Indiana University, ggursel@indiana.edu
This presentation explores English as the world’s linga franca and examines the implications for teaching it. We review the rise of English as a global language; explore the relationship between language, identity, and power; and discuss teaching English as an international “code/language of power.

Session W-103
Is this Real?: Teaching with Tony Danza

Jacqueline Bach, Louisiana State University, jbach@lsu.edu


This paper considers the pedagogical implications of using the A&E reality television show, Teach: Tony Danza in teacher education courses. Findings indicate that because students were knowledgeable about the genre of reality television, they were able to interrogate and find use in the show’s representation of teachers and teaching.

Troubling the “Good Teacher”: Curriculum, Reflective Practice and the Epistemology of Mastery

Cristyne Hebert, York University, cristyne_hebert@edu.yorku.ca


Reflective practice has become systematized and routinized in attempts to standardize the practice as a measurable outcome in teacher education programs. This paper explores how the subjectivities of future teachers are constrained within a professionalized identity that may be discordant with their experiences both in the classroom and in the world.
Session W-104
Sustainable Pedagogy in an Audit Culture: Toward a Collaborative Method of Inquiry

Brandon Sams, Auburn University, bls0023@auburn.edu

Alyson Whyte, Auburn University, whyteal@auburn.edu
Alyson and Brandon are new colleagues in an English Language Arts Education program at a large state university. Our joint purpose is to conduct action and arts-informed curriculum inquiry to understand what a commitment to literary studies might mean and to (in)form an ELA curriculum for the coming year. Our work aims to extend conceptual understandings of English as a curriculum subject that fits within the arts (Hall, Rix, & Eyres, 2007).

Zine Conversations: Affirmations, Interventions, and Access

Karin H. deGravelles, Episcopal High School of Baton Rouge, degravellesk@ehsbr.org


The narratives of seven educators who read or create zines--self-published magazines--show one promise of teaching zines is drawing students into a public conversation. These zine conversations are characterized by affirmation through promises of accessibility, participation, and self-authorization, as well as intervention through critiques of mainstream media and culture.

Going to the dark side?: The first weeks and months of a curriculum scholar working as a chief diversity officer

Erik Malewski, Kennesaw State University, erik.l.malewski@gmail.com


This session will focus on a curriculum scholar's transition from being faculty to the role of chief diversity officer at a university. He'll address changes in discourse and language, shifting expectations and assumptions, and the possibilities and limits when one goes to the "other side".
Session W-105

Post-Plastic Parenting

Laura Rychly, Georgia Southern University, laura_j_rychly@georgiasouthern.edu

Julie Garlen Maudlin, Georgia Southern University, jmaudlin@georgiasouthern.edu

Jennifer A. Sandlin, Arizona State University, jennifer.sandlin@asu.edu


Drawing on notions of lifestyle and life politics and Foucauldian politics of the self, we analyze an emerging trend towards “ethical consumerism,” or, as we assert, “post-plastic parenting.” We explore tensions between the view that ethical consumerism fosters political and civic engagement and the view that it diminishes such engagement.

Session W-200 5:15pm-6:15pm

Session W-201
Language and literacy instruction enacting the possibilities for "thirdspace" pedagogies in elementary classrooms

Susan Latona, State University of New York at Buffalo, susan.latona@verizon.net


Creating a language education environment that integrates Common Core standards with socio-emotional learning and affective teaching is an essential goal for curriculum development. In this paper I synthesize theoretical support for dialogical and social interactions that actively connect to the diverse life worlds of students and propose a curriculum that incorporates the benefits of such pedagogy.

Wolfgang Iser meets the Common Core: A hermeneutic appraisal of a watershed moment in national reading policy

Zan Crowder, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, crowderzan@gmail.com


This paper examines the Common Core State Standards for English through the lens of Wolfgang Iser's interpretation theory. Iser argued that the act of reading is interactional and that the reader was an active participant in meaning making rather than a processor of information. It provides a counter-narrative to the view of reading espoused in the CCSS.

Session W-202
DIY Art Education: Learning in the digital communities of gamers and makers - CCP

Ryan Patton, Virginia Commonwealth University, rpatton@vcu.edu


This paper investigates ways maker and game communities can be used to shape and influencing new media education. I will argue how these DIY spaces function as centers for peer learning and knowledge sharing, by removing technical hurdles for the art education community.

Educating for Democracy: Ethical, Empowered Social Entrepreneurship for Kids

David Elias, Civic Leadership Foundation, delias@civicleadershipfoundation.org


This presentation describes, and offers examples of, a curriculum for teaching social entrepreneurship with extensive preparation in ethics and empowerment practices. I will begin with observations of current trends in curriculum development, offer examples of the new curriculum, and reflect on the impacts on participants actually using the program.
Session W-203
Introducing Karaoke as a Pedagogical Instrument in the 21st Century Classroom

Pam Golden, Eastern Kentucky University, pamela_golden2@eku.edu


This paper introduces karaoke as a pedagogical instrument under the auspices of the applied creativity and critical thinking models endorsed by the Department of English at EKU. The paper addresses the general process of learning the benefits and effects music has on learning, namely, the teaching of writing.

From Cause to Fiction - Writing for Social Justice

David S. McCabe, Pasadena City College, dsmccabe@pasadena.edu


There has been a well-established tradition in Western civilization of using the written word as a tool for social criticism. Writers have long used literature as a means of demanding social change and justice. This session will exam how scholars can address injustice and challenge the dominant narrative through writing.

Session W-204
Creole Curriculum: A New Orleans Education through Food

Danielle Klein, Louisiana State University, dklei11@tigers.lsu.edu


Creole, as an idea and an identity, is continually reborn and recreated throughout the years and is used to designate a spectrum of realities. This paper explores the ways Creole as a cuisine reflects the cultural identity of New Orleans and how this identity is preserved and passed on through a non-traditional curriculum.

This is a Paper About Food. And Farming.

Sean Fretwell, Georgia Southern University, sf00247@georgiasouthern.edu


This is a paper about food and farming. It discusses issues related to the increasing popularity of local/sustainable food production as a way of living out a post-industrial critique against the industrialization of food. I use my personal farming experience and research about food culture in America to defend a way of becoming better stewards of ourselves, and the land that nourishes us.
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