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ENGLISH PROFICIENCY PROGRAM
A quality education includes literacy in writing. A degree from Southwestern Oklahoma State University carries a certification that each baccalaureate graduate is proficient in the use of written English.
Every student seeking a baccalaureate degree must satisfactorily demonstrate proficiency in one of two ways: by earning a grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 1213 Freshman Composition II or by passing the English Proficiency Exam.
Students who earn a “D” in ENGL 1213 have passed the class but have not demonstrated proficiency; they may choose to demonstrate proficiency either by passing the examination or by retaking the course and earning a grade of “C” or higher.
The English Proficiency Exam is administered at the Assessment Center and evaluated by two or more English faculty members. Any student who has completed ENGL 1213 with a grade of “D” may request an appointment to take the exam at the Assessment Center.

ENROLLMENT
Southwestern Oklahoma State University uses an online computerized enrollment system, making pre-enrollment both quick and efficient. Complete enrollment information can be found in the current Class Schedule. Schedules are available on the SWOSU website at www.swosu.edu. (Beginning freshman with no college hours earned are required to attend a New Student Orientation session in order to enroll for the fall semester. Students who have been out of high school two or more years do not have to attend an NSO session. Contact the Office of the Registrar for enrollment procedures and advisor assignment.)
EXAMINATIONS
Examinations given during the semester are scheduled by the instructors. Final examinations, except in the College of Pharmacy, follow the University plan printed in the class schedules.
Students may drop classes up to five days prior to the beginning of finals. During the regular semesters, the three class days prior to the beginning of finals are considered "dead days" in that no graded assignments or activities are to be scheduled. Extracurricular events (other than unscheduled league play-off events) and required field trips are prohibited. Attendance policies will remain in force.
Examinations for single classes must follow the schedule. Multi-section examinations must be approved by the Vice President for Student Affairs one week before the first day of final examinations. In case of conflicts between single sections and multi-sections, the single section takes precedence for the student’s time.
If a student is unable to meet the regular examination schedule (no early final examinations), an “I” grade shall be reported.
FULL-TIME STUDENTS
Standard Term: Any course(s) that meets a full 16 weeks during the fall and spring semesters and 8 weeks for the summer. All full-time students are enrolled in a minimum of twelve (12) hours per semester and six (6) hours during a summer term. Three quarter-time students are enrolled in a minimum of nine (9) hours per semester and four (4) hours during a summer term. Half time students are enrolled in a minimum of six (6) hours per semester and three (3) hours during a summer term.
Non-Standard Term: Any term that does not meet the 16 week requirement stated above. All full-time students are enrolled in a minimum of six (6) hours per eight (8) week classes and three (3) hours per four (4) week term. Three quarter-time students are enrolled in a minimum of four (4) hours per eight (8) week classes and two (2) hours per 4 week term. Half time students are enrolled in a minimum of three (3) hours per eight (8) week classes and one point five (1.5) hours per 4 week term.
Enrollments that exceed nineteen (19) hours during the fall and spring semesters and nine (9) hours during the summer term are exceptions and must be approved by the Provost or Graduate Dean.
GRADE REPORTS
Final grade reports are no longer mailed at the end of each semester. Grades are available online through Campus Connect. Campus Connect allows student access to unofficial transcripts, grades, billing information, financial aid information, personal demographic information, and course availability information.
GRADES
Grade schedule: The quality of work done in classes is designated by the following schedule of grades:

A Excellent

B Good

C Average



D Lowest Passing Grade

F Failure

I Incomplete

W Withdrawal

AW Administrative Withdrawal

S Satisfactory

P Pass

U Failure



N Grade Deferred

X Thesis in Progress

AU Audit
Grade Points: Students earn grade points on this schedule:
A 4 points per semester hour

B 3 points per semester hour

C 2 points per semester hour

D 1 point per semester hour

F 0 points per semester hour

U 0 points per semester hour

S 0 points per semester hour
If a course is repeated, both grades are used in computing the student’s grade point average. A grade of “S”, “P”, “I”, “U”, “NP”, or “W” has no effect on the average.
Incomplete: A grade of “I” will be given to students who, because of illness or other unavoidable circumstances, cannot complete a course by the end of a semester. “I” grades not changed by the instructor to a credit-bearing grade or an “F” will remain a permanent “I” and not contribute to the GPA.
Withdrawal: Students may withdraw within the first (eleven) 11 weeks of class work during a regular semester or within the first six weeks of class work during the summer term and receive a grade of “W”. Instructors have the right to give a “W” as a final grade.
Students may withdraw with instructor permission up to five (5) days prior to the beginning of finals and receive a “W” for courses in which they are doing passing work and an “F” for courses in which they are failing.
Students who leave school without officially withdrawing may receive the grade of “F” for courses in which they are enrolled.
GRADUATION INFORMATION
Degrees are conferred at spring convocation. Those completing degree requirements at the end of a fall semester may participate in the following spring convocation. Those completing degree requirements at the end of a summer or fall semester may participate in the preceding spring convocation.
December graduates may walk through the graduation ceremony early. For example, if a student is scheduled to graduate in December 2014, s/he may (1) walk through the ceremony in May 2014 (before graduating) or (2) walk through the ceremony in May 2015 (after graduating).
Southwestern Oklahoma State University grants Undergraduate degrees “with honors” as follows:
Summa Cum Laude 3.90

Magna Cum Laude 3.75



Cum Laude 3.50
Honors standing is determined by calculating the grade point average (GPA) for all credit hours attempted. The cumulative GPA, not the retention/graduate GPA is used in the calculation.
Application for Graduation forms should be completed in the office of the Registrar for bachelor’s degrees and in the Graduate Office for master’s degrees. Students finishing in either the fall or spring semester should apply for graduation at the beginning of the semester. Students completing degrees during the summer term should apply for graduation by mid-term of the spring semester.
Degrees are recorded on the student’s permanent academic record. Transcripts are available approximately one week after the close of each semester or term.
HONOR ROLLS
The undergraduate student’s semester record must have no grade of “I”, “U”, “F”, or “D” to be considered for the honor rolls. Types and qualifications for honor rolls are as follows:
President’s Honor Roll: Undergraduate students who complete 12 or more hours during a semester and earn a 4.00 grade point average qualify for this honor roll.
Dean’s Honor Roll: Undergraduate students who complete 12 or more hours during a semester and earn a 3.50 or higher grade point average qualify for this honor roll.
KEYBOARDING PROFICIENCY PROGRAM
Since the curricula of high schools universally include keyboarding instruction and training, demonstration of keyboarding proficiency is no longer required at SWOSU. However, to most effectively use the computer resources available at SWOSU, students are encouraged to ensure that they are proficient. Students should be able to keyboard at a minimum of 35 words per minute with not more than seven errors.
LOAD/OVERLOAD
Students who plan to graduate in four years should enroll in an academic course load of at least 16 credit hours each fall and spring semester.
Undergraduate: With approval of the advisor, a student may take a maximum of 19 hours during a regular semester and 9 hours during a summer term. With the approval of both the advisor and the Provost, a student may take a maximum of 24 hours during a regular semester and 12 hours during a summer term.
Graduate: A full-time student may enroll in 16 hours during a regular semester and nine hours during a summer term. The Dean of the Graduate School must approve an overload. An overload is defined as 17 or more hours during a regular semester and 10 or more during a summer term. A minimum graduate load during a regular semester is nine hours for full-time, seven hours for ¾ time, and five hours for ½ time. The corresponding standard for a summer term is four, three, and two respectively. The minimum-load definition also applies to one attending under Veteran Administration assistance. Students enrolled simultaneously in two or more institutions are bound by the load maximum stated above.
PREREQUISITES
The section of the catalog in which courses are listed and described includes a statement of prerequisites for courses requiring preliminary study.
RETENTION STANDARDS
The following standards relating to retention of students pursuing study in undergraduate programs will apply at Southwestern Oklahoma State University. For continued good academic standing, a student must have earned a cumulative grade point average as indicated below:
One to 30 semester hours attempted 1.70

31 or more semester hours attempted 2.00


NOTE: Students who have attempted less than 31 semester hours will be placed on academic notice if the cumulative grade point is between 1.70 and 1.99.
Any student not maintaining satisfactory academic progress will be placed on probation for one semester. At the end of the semester, the student must have earned the minimum grade point average listed above in order to continue.
Exception 1. A student who achieved a grade point average of 2.00 or above in the last semester in which the student was enrolled will be considered to be making satisfactory progress, regardless of the cumulative grade point average. (Under these circumstances, a student will remain on probation until a 2.00 cumulative grade point average is achieved.)
Exception 2. A senior student who has failed to meet the cumulative grade point average (2.00) required for graduation may enroll in an additional 15 semester hours in further attempt to achieve the requirements for graduation.
Requirements for continued enrollment in certain professional programs are higher than those stated here. For information on retention standards of the professional programs, refer to that specific section of this catalog.
GENERAL EDUCATION



General Education at Southwestern Oklahoma State University emphasizes the learning of facts, values, understandings, skills, attitudes, and appreciations believed to be meaningful to all students because of their involvement as human beings and citizens preparing for the future. The General Education program incorporates the following outcomes:


  • Basic skills in communication and mathematics – these include the ability to understand the ideas of others; to communicate one’s ideas through writing, speech, and symbols; to understand mathematics concepts, principles, symbols, and logic; to think logically, critically, and creatively; and to use computers and other information technologies.

  • Appreciation of our scientific heritage – this includes an understanding of the basic laws and concepts of science; a knowledge of the basic methodologies and phenomena of natural science; and the impact of scientific discovery and the ensuing technology on society.

  • Appreciation of the fine arts – this includes knowledge of important individuals and some of their works and an appreciation of aesthetic, technical, symbolic, and historic effects of the fine arts.

  • Knowledge of social and intellectual beings and their institutions – this includes studies of behavioral aspects of individuals and society; past and present world cultures; current social issues and trends; the importance of health and wellness; the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a democratic society; an understanding of global, social, economic, political, and ecological interdependence; and an appreciation of cultural diversity.


GENERAL EDUCATION GUIDELINES


  • All students must complete an approved General Education program in order to graduate from a college or university in the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education. At Southwestern Oklahoma State University, because of differing curriculum and/or accreditation requirements, some degree programs follow slightly different course sequences than the General Education requirements listed on this page. The specific General Education requirements approved for each degree program are listed with the academic requirements.

  • Students entering Southwestern must meet General Education requirements listed in the current catalog for graduation. (For certification and license requirements, refer to specific programs.)

  • Courses satisfying General Education course requirements cannot be used to satisfy requirements in the major, major/minor, and/or minor.

  • Some General Education course requirements may be met via CLEP, AP, International Baccalaureate, and other advanced standing tests.

  • A maximum of 10 credit hours of General Education credit may be substituted through alternative courses. Any substitution of alternative courses must address all General Education outcomes indicated for the General Education course for which the substitution is requested. All alternative courses must be approved by the appropriate academic departments for course content equivalency, the General Education Committee, and the Vice President for Student Affairs.

  • Mid-level assessment is accomplished within the General Education courses. Faculty use curriculum-embedded methods such as exams, papers, projects, etc. for improvement of instruction.



General Education Curriculum
TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS Min. 40

REQUIRED CORE COURSES 31-35
Written Communication 6

ENGL 1113 English Composition I

ENGL 1213 English Composition II
Mathematics 3

Select one course.

MATH 1143 Mathematical Concepts

MATH 1153 Mathematical Applications

MATH 1513 College Algebra



or a higher numbered math course
U. S. History 3

Select one course.

HIST 1043 U.S. History to 1877

HIST 1053 U.S. History since 1877
American Government 3

POLSC 1103 American Government & Politics


Science 7-8

Select one course from Life Science and one course from Physical Science. One Science course must be a lab science.

Life Science 3-4

BIOL 1004 Biological Concepts w/Lab

BIOL 1054 Principles of Biology I w/Lab

BIOL 1013 Current Issues in Biology


Physical Science 3-4

ASTRO 1904 Astronomy

CHEM 1004 General Chemistry w/Lab

GEOL 1934 Physical Geology w/Lab

SCI 1513 Concepts of Physical Science (can be taken w/wo lab)

SCI 1501 Concepts of Physical Science Lab

PHY 1044 Basic Physics I

PHY 1063 General Physics



a higher numbered chemistry or physics course



Humanities 6

HUM 1103 Introduction to Humanities



OR

HIST 1033 World History


AND one of the following:
ART 1223 Art Survey

COMM 1263 Introduction to Theatre

LIT 2333 Introduction to Film

LIT 2413 Introduction to Literature

MUSIC 1013 Introduction to Music I

MUSIC 1103 Music and Culture

PHILO 1453 Introduction to Philosophy
Human, Cultural, & Social Diversity 3-4

Select one course.

ASL 2163 American Sign Language I

CATC 1204 Cheyenne Language I (or higher number)

CATC 1254 Arapaho Language I (or higher number)

COMM 1313 Introduction to Public Speaking

ECONO 2263 Intro to Macroeconomics

ECONO 2363 Intro to Microeconomics

GEOG 1103 World Cultural Geography

ITAL 1004 Elementary Italian I

KINES 1133 Wellness Concepts & Exercise Applications

LATIN 1054 Elementary Latin I (or higher number)

PSYCH 1003 General Psychology

SOCIO 1003 Introduction to Sociology

SPAN 1054 Elementary Spanish I (or higher number)

TECH 1223 Technology and Society
Computer Proficiency 0-3

Students must demonstrate computer proficiency (high school Computer Science course, SWOSU computer proficiency exam, or COMSC 1023 Computer & Info Access).



ELECTIVES to bring GE total hours to 40 5-9
Select courses from at least 2 areas. Any courses not taken to meet core requirements may satisfy the 2 areas. No course may be counted twice. Many courses are not offered every semester; refer to semester class schedules, or check course descriptions for frequency of offering.
*Indicates prerequisite required
COMMUNICATION & SYMBOLS

ACCTG 2213 Principles of Financial Accounting

ALHLT 2453 Medical Terminology

ALHLT 3043 Health Statistics

COMM 1313 Introduction to Public Speaking

COMM 2103 Introduction to Mass Communication

COMM 2113 Writing for Mass Media

COMSC 1023 Computer & Info Access

COMSC 1033 Computer Science I

COMSC 1433 Visual Basic Programming

ECONO 2463 Business Statistics

ENGL 2713 Creative Writing – Poetry (Sayre)*

ENGL 3013 Writing Theory and Practice*

ENGL 3473 Creative Writing of Fiction I*

ENGL 3483 Creative Writing of Poetry I*

ENGL 3653 Writing in the Disciplines*

ENGL 4423 Introduction to Linguistics*

LIBED 3423 Media & Technology

MATH 1143 Mathematical Concepts

MATH 1153 Mathematical Applications

MATH 1513 College Algebra

MATH 1613 College Trigonometry*

MATH 1834 Calculus I*

MATH 2823 Applied Calculus*

MATH 2834 Calculus II*

MATH 3413 Statistical Methods I*

MATH 3453 Mathematical Statistics*

PSYCH 2433 Psychological Statistics*

TECH 3143 Technical Presentations*
SOCIAL, POLITICAL, & ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS

CATC 2133 Tribal Government I

COMSC 1103 Introduction to Information Security

CRMJS 1113 Introduction to Criminal Justice

CRMJS 1223 Introduction to Law Enforcement

ECONO 2263 Introduction to Macroeconomics

ECONO 2363 Introduction to Microeconomics

EDUC 2113 Foundations of Education

ENTRP 1123 Introduction to Business (Sayre)

POLSC 2303 Comparative Politics*

POLSC 2623 Criminal Law and Procedure*

POLSC 2803 The Judicial Process*

PSYCH 2423 Social Psychology*

SOCIO 1003 Introduction to Sociology

TECH 1223 Technology and Society
RELATIONSHIPS IN NATURE & SCIENCE

ASTRO 1904 Astronomy

BIOL 1004 Biological Concepts w/lab

BIOL 1054 Principles of Biology I w/lab

BIOL 1254 Principles of Biology II w/lab*

BIOL 1013 Current Issues in Biology

BIOL 2205 Human Anatomy & Physiology w/lab* (Sayre)

CHEM 1004 General Chemistry w/lab

GEOL 1934 Physical Geology w/lab

PHY 1044 Basic Physics I

PHY 1063 General Physics

PSYCH 1003 General Psychology

SCI 1513 Concepts of Physical Science

SCI 1501 Concepts of Physical Science Lab

TECH 1101 Introduction to Technology

TECH 1223 Technology & Society

TECH 1713 Basic Electrical Science*
HUMAN HERITAGE, CULTURE, VALUES & BELIEFS

ASL 2163 American Sign Language I

ART 1113 Fundamentals of Art

ART 1223 Art Survey

CATC 1111 Introduction to American Indian Studies

CATC 1204 Cheyenne Language I (or higher number)

CATC 1254 Arapaho Language I (or higher number)

CATC 1413 American Indian Belief Systems

CATC 1553 Literature of the American Indian

CATC 1563 Music of the American Indian

CATC 2143 Art History of the Plains Indian

CATC 2603 Cheyenne and Arapaho History

COMM 1263 Introduction to Theatre

COMM 3573 Intercultural Communication

GEOG 1103 World Cultural Geography

HIST 1003 Early World History (Sayre)

HIST 1023 Modern World History

HIST 1033 World History

HIST 1043 U.S. History to 1877

HIST 1053 U.S. History since 1877

HIST 3613 World Religions*

HIST 4133 Women in American History*

HUM 1103 Introduction to Humanities

ITAL 1004 Elementary Italian I

KINES 1133 Wellness Concepts & Exercise Applications

KINES 1153 Nutrition

LATIN 1054 Elementary Latin I (or higher number)

LIT 1123 Introduction to Fiction (Sayre)

LIT 2333 Introduction to Film

LIT 2413 Introduction to Literature

LIT 3033 World Mythology*

LIT 3343 World Folk Literature*

MUSIC 1013 Introduction to Music I

MUSIC 1103 Music and Culture

MUSIC 1023 History of Jazz

MUSIC 1123 History of Rock and Roll

PHILO 1453 Introduction to Philosophy

PSYCH 3243 Cross-Cultural Psychology*

SOCIO 2103 Social Problems (Sayre)

SPAN 1054 Elementary Spanish I (or higher number)



SPAN 3553 Hispanic Life and Culture

SPAN 3653 Intermediate Spanish Conversation
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